4

Rambam, Hilchos Melachim 3:2: ואם הוסיף אחת ובעלה לוקה If he adds an extra wife and has relations with her, he gets lashed. So that answers question #3. As for the others: On the face of it, kiddushin ought to take effect like in any other case of חייבי לאוין (according to everyone except R' Akiva, and maybe even according to him, since the issur ...


4

Some commentators say that Zerubbabel was supposed to be king (such as Ibn Ezra, see e.g. his commentary to 4:14). Zerubbabel is never explicitly called a king, but he was from the royal family (1 Chronicles 3:19), and also served as governor (פֶּחָה) of Judea (Haggai 1:1). Zerubbabel was the one who built the Temple (he participates in the building in Ezra,...


3

The Yerushalmi to this Mishnah brings two explanations for R’ Shimon’s opinion: חברייא אמרין טעמא דר"ש משם שהגדולה מכפרת אמר ר' יוסי שאין חטאו וידיעתו שוין The Chaveirim say: The reason for R’ Shimon is because his stature atones. R’ Yosi said: because his sin and knowledge aren’t the same. That is to say: According to the Chaveirim, that he ...


3

This is unsourced. The reason why horses and gold aren’t given a set amount is that different kings have needs for different amounts of each depending on the circumstances. For example, during a time of war, a king would need more gold to pay soldiers and more horses for them to ride on than in a time of peace. Therefore the Rambam said that a king can’t ...


2

This seems to come from a beraita quoted in Sotah 10a regarding five individuals, four of whom were kings (or would-be kings): ת"ר חמשה נבראו מעין דוגמא של מעלה וכולן לקו בהן שמשון בכחו שאול בצוארו אבשלום בשערו צדקיה בעיניו אסא ברגליו The Sages taught: Five individuals were created with a characteristic that is akin to a representation of the One on ...


2

A King of Jewish people only has the Halachic status of being a King when in Israel Deuteronomy 17,14 When you come to the land (of Israel) which Hashem your G-d gives you and you Dwell in it, you say "let us appoint a King" The Gemora Sanhedrin 20b quoted by Rambam Hilchos Melachim 1,1 says that appointing a King is one of the 3 commandments of ...


2

The Gemara addresses this in 19b, and Rashi there explains the mishna; he says the issue here is that yibbum and chalitzah both clash with the obligation of a king's honor. Chalitza -- to have him summoned before the court and for someone to spit in front of him; yibbum (this is cool!) -- for him to say "I'm filling in for my dead brother" ... the king ...


2

While not explicitly addressing your scenario, the Rambam Hilchos Melachim 2:6 writes about how a king should behave and generally conduct himself: כְּדֶרֶךְ שֶׁחָלַק לוֹ הַכָּתוּב הַכָּבוֹד הַגָּדוֹל. וְחִיֵּב הַכּל בִּכְבוֹדוֹ. כָּךְ צִוָּהוּ לִהְיוֹת לִבּוֹ בְּקִרְבּוֹ שָׁפָל וְחָלָל שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (תהילים קט כב) "וְלִבִּי חָלַל בְּקִרְבִּי". וְלֹא ...


1

In this answer a man with amputated legs above the knee cannot do Chalitza and would normally have to do Yibbum whether sefaradi or ashkenazi. Seridei Eish III 49 quoting Or zarua 665. So if this amputee is also forbidden by a Negative commandment to marry this woman in these cases: a Petzua Daka - he has crushed genitals and cannot marry a Yisraelis (...


1

I personally think the reason is explicitly presented in Avos 3,1: "רַבִּי חֲנִינָא סְגַן הַכֹּהֲנִים אוֹמֵר, הֱוֵי מִתְפַּלֵּל בִּשְׁלוֹמָהּ שֶׁל מַלְכוּת, שֶׁאִלְמָלֵא מוֹרָאָהּ, אִישׁ אֶת רֵעֵהוּ חַיִּים בְּלָעוֹ." "Rabbi Chanina, the Deputy High Priest, says: Pray for the welfare of the government, for were it not for the fear of it, man would ...


1

Indeed, the Lubavitcher Rebbe made reference to this in his later years. In addition to the address of the center of operations for Chabad Chassidim (770), the Rebbe would often show the spiritual significance of various such details (often including the date at which he spoke), playing on the idea that Hashgacha Pratit holds it that nothing is by chance, ...


1

As to your point about Yehoshua not being a(n official) king, see your question about this and the answers thereto which provide sources stating that Yehoshua was a king. Also note that in his commentary to the statement of Rambam that you cited here, R. David Ibn Zimra writes that a king for these purposes does not have to be officially appointed. As long ...


1

It's an interesting question, and I suspect you won't find a clear source. Even a surface reading of the Tanach makes it clear that there were many customs which the Jews either had from ancient times, or had adopted from their surroundings. The Tanach isn't a history book and doesn't detail things that don't have importance for all time. Nonetheless, it's ...


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