11

S'forno says it would be inappropriate for Yosef to approach the king while dressed in mourning. Similarly, Haamek Davar says it would be inappropriate for Yosef to approach the king while before Yaakov's burial, while he (Yosef) is an onen.


11

The Ramban says the reason why his name is not mentioned is due to the fact that the city was small with few people living there, he was not famous. The Shaarei Aharon (from whom I am quoting all these answers) suggests that the names mentioned here are based on the evil nature of the people we are mentioning. Being that the king of Tzoar was not so evil ...


10

I don't know if this is the earliest source, but it is pretty early. In Pirkei deRabbi Eliezer Chapter 3 the Torah asks God the following question: רבון כל העולם אם אין צבא למלך ואם אין מחנה למלך על מה הוא מולך, אם אין עם לקלס למלך אי זה הוא כבודו של מלך?‏ Master of the Universe, if a king does not have armies or camps then what is he king of? If ...


10

Well, I guess we can start with Zecharia 9:9 גִּילִי מְאֹד בַּת צִיּוֹן הָרִיעִי בַּת יְרוּשָׁלִַם הִנֵּה מַלְכֵּךְ יָבוֹא לָךְ צַדִּיק וְנוֹשָׁע הוּא עָנִי וְרֹכֵב עַל חֲמוֹר וְעַל עַיִר בֶּן אֲתֹנוֹת Be exceedingly happy, O daughter of Zion; Shout, O daughter of Jerusalem. Behold! Your king shall come to you. He is just and victorious; humble, and riding ...


10

The Torah uses the male form for the words, and the Sages extrapolated from here that male Amonites and Moavites are banned from the congregation, but females are not. It says on Chabad's Ask the Rabbi page that the decree was made against the men because they did no go to greet the Jews with food and drink. (See Devarim 23:5.) This was not expected of the ...


8

The Radbaz's language (responsum #296) is that he can kill "keMishpat", lawfully. A mob boss, for instance, has the ability to kill, but not lawfully. So I presume if the use of power was totally unlawful for the position, halacha wouldn't consider it. (It doesn't say "he can kill anyone he feels like", or "he can kill you." Just that he can lawfully find ...


8

Rabbi Yonason Eibushutz answered humorously that disposing of two evil doers ( Bigsan and Teresh) is better than one ( Ahashverosh) The midrash (footnote 73) and Sefarim Chitzonum writes that Bigsan and Teresh were in cohoots with Haman. If Ahasverish was killed Haman would have taken his place. In that case it is clear that Ahasverosh is better than Haman. ...


8

Many meforshim understand that when the Gemara refers to Rome it is referring to the Christian nations. See here for example in the Ramban in Sefer HaGeulah - start from last word on the sixth line. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=41398&st=&pgnum=51&hilite= (The discussion of the four kingdoms is from the beginning of the perek ...


7

Sefer Hachiunuch doesn't list the reading/learning as its own commandment. Instead, part of his definition of the commandment for the king to write a Torah scroll, Commandment #494, includes "so that it will always be with him, and he'll read from it." He does not, however, specify how frequently or extensively the king is to read from it. He further ...


7

The basic answer is that because the king was sleeping with Esther so often he became thirsty very often so they were constantly having to bring him water and then later bring him his lavatory. See Rashi's comments on Megillah 13b. It was their job to both guard the door and supply any of his needs during the night. When he wasn't sleeping with Esther they ...


7

I believe the earliest source is Pirkei Derabbi Eliezer Chapter 16. החתן דומה למלך מה המלך הכל מקלסין אותו שבעת ימי המשתה כך חתן הכל מקלסין אותו שבעת ימי המשתה מה המלך לובש בגדי כבוד כך החתן לובש בגדי כבוד מה המלך שמחה ומשתה לפניו כל הימים כך החתן שמחה ומשתה לפניו כל שבעת ימים מה המלך אינו יוצא לשוק לבדו כך החתן אינו יוצא לשוק לבדו מה המלך פניו מאירות ...


7

Ruth 4: 18 - 22 Peretz, Chetzron, Ram, Aminadav, Nachshon, Salmon, Boaz, Oved, Yishai, Dovid. Nachshon was the nasi of Yehudah at the time of the Exodus. Sotah 11b says that Dovid descended from Miriam. However, Calev is not mentioned. Some commentators connect Dovid being called Efrati with Miriam (Efrat) and say that one of her descendants married into the ...


7

In Shmuel 1 chapter 8 vs 6 Rashi explains that the problem with the request wasthe fact that they said 'to rule over us like all the nations'. The Radak there explains that it was apparent they made their request as a complaint, not that they were looking to be mikayem the mitzvah of appointing a king. See here Why did the people want a king? the first ...


7

I think the answer to this question lies in how Shmuel chose to rebuke the nation. In chapter 12, Shmuel recaps the mistake that the Jewish people have made in requesting a king. In verse 17, he tells them the following: הֲלוֹא קְצִיר-חִטִּים, הַיּוֹם--אֶקְרָא אֶל-יְהוָה, וְיִתֵּן קֹלוֹת וּמָטָר; וּדְעוּ וּרְאוּ, כִּי-רָעַתְכֶם רַבָּה אֲשֶׁר עֲשִׂיתֶם ...


7

Both Targums on Esther 2:5 identify The Shimei in Mordecai's lineage with Shimei Ben Gera. They state that David saw through a prophetic experience that Mordecai (and Esther according to the first Targum) descended from Shimei, so he delayed his revenge until Shimei stopped bearing children to allow for the subsequent salvation of the Jewish people in the ...


7

Rambam, Hilchos Melachim 3:2: ואם הוסיף אחת ובעלה לוקה If he adds an extra wife and has relations with her, he gets lashed. So that answers question #3. As for the others: On the face of it, kiddushin ought to take effect like in any other case of חייבי לאוין (according to everyone except R' Akiva, and maybe even according to him, since the issur isn't ...


6

After perusing the Tanach to confirm, I have some found some answers to this question: First, Shlomo definitely had contact with both his parents. He was anointed by Nathan and Zadok, at David's command, in I Melachim 1:32-34. There must have been some contact time between then and when David charged him with farewell instructions in Chapter 2. As for ...


6

Rabbi Menachem Azariya miPano in Asara Ma'amaros, Eim Kol Chai, section 3 simanim 9-10 cites an unsourced midrash that Shlomo met Naamah when he was cast out of his kingdom by the demon king Ashmedia (see gittin 68b). The story goes that Ashmedai cast Shlomo's ring, which had the name of God engraved in it, into the ocean. Shlomo the wanderer ended up in the ...


6

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exilarch The last exilarch (Reish Galusa) whose name is recorded is Hezekiah. He was imprisoned and tortured to death in 1040. He was the last exilarch. However daat.ac.il says that it ended earlier by the leaders of the Jews due to fears of the Muslims. בשנת 941 מת נשיא הגולה דוד בן זכאי, ורב סעדיה גאון, איש ריבו ...


6

Rabbeinu Bechaye says it (using those words) in his commentary on the Torah, Bereshit 38:30. It is a long entry, but the relevant portion is found towards the end (top of the first column here). He also says it in his introduction to Parshat Balak (about 15 lines in here). He also brings it up in another Sefer of his called Kad HeKemach (Rosh Hashana (2) d"...


6

The people wanted a king so that they could more closely resemble the other nations (Sh'muel I, 8:5,20; Radak ad loc.). This motivation made their desire for a king contemptible (Sanhedrin 20b; Sh'muel I, 8:7-8; cf. D'varim 17:14-15), despite the fact that, according to some opinions, there is a biblical obligation to appoint a king (see the dispute in ...


6

The curse of Yechonya (or Yehoyachin) was revoked and his wife had two sons while he was in prison. This is rebuilding of the Davidic line through Zerubavel. Note that this means that since Yehoyachin was the last king who had children that survived (all of Tzidkiyahus children were killed at the destruction of the first temple) Mashiach would therefore ...


6

Sefer Moshav Zekeinim end Parshas Beshalach brings it in the name of a Medrash, however does not indicate where this Medrash is.


6

Madanei Asher page 168 discusses this question and answers as follows. Shaalos U'Tshuvis Radbaz - Volume 2 #772 says that a Jewish king is not judged and therefore would not go to exile. Regarding prior to the time of Yanai Hamelech when Jewish kings were judged he says even there a Jewish king would not be exiled based on the Gemara - Makos 10a that a ...


6

In North Korea the ruling class is (strangely) treated like a deity according to this Wikipedia article similar to Nevuchadzezzar and the idol he built. As such, bowing is assur (even without prostration - pishut yadaim veraglayim). Even removing one's hat in deference is assur (cf Yoreh Deah 150:3 Rema) If one is bowing down to a person who is not treated ...


6

One is allowed to bow before a king, even a secular king. Halacha does not forbid bowing to a king or, by extension, an important official in the king's court. In Tanach, we find a number of instances when prominent Jews bowed to kings, such as the prophet Natan bowing to David (Melachim 1:1:23) and Yosef's brothers bowing to Yosef (Bereishit 42:6). ...


6

Pirkei Avos says: "Hevei mispallel b'shloma shel malchus" - Pray for the peace of the government. Even though there is no concept of lo ta'amod for Mordechai to adhere to, the assassination of the King would lead to severe sociopolitical upheaval. As subjects to the kingdom, it is our obligation to maintain, or at the very least pray for, the general order. ...


6

Minchas Chinuch suggests it: והנה מבואר בש"ס דהמלך הי' קורא וא"י אם הל"מ כ"ה דדוקא מלך ואם אין מלך בישראל אין מצוה כלל א"כ עד שאול המלך עליו השלום לא נתקיימה מצוה זו ואפשר דל"ד מלך רק גדול שבדורו עליו היה המצוה אם לא הי' מלך וכ"נ מצד הסברא Now it is explained in the Gemara that the king reads, but I don't know if the ...


6

From Menashe. See Pesikta Rabbati 3 ובמלכים ירבעם בן נבט משל אפרים ואחרי כן יהוא בן (מנשה) [נמשי] משבט מנשה


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible