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11

The Rambam (Tefilah 9:9) and Rashba (Responsum 1:183) write that Maariv's status as reshut is the reason there is no enactment for the leader to repeat the Amida aloud for those who don't know how to pray.


10

There is no Miswa of Sisit at night (see Rabenu Behaye to Numbers 15:38-39).


9

The Rambam (Tefilah 9:9) and Rashba (Responsum 1:183) write that Maariv's status as reshut is the reason there is no enactment for the leader to repeat the Amida aloud for those who don't know how to pray.


8

Yalkut Yosef (106:1) says that a woman's primary obligation for tefillah is to daven Shacharit. He permits women to daven Mincha or Arvit if they're unable to daven Shacharit. If a woman wants to daven all three tefillot, she is permitted to as well. He mentions that the reason for permitting this is that davening is asking Hashem for mercy (תפילה בקשת ...


8

Because sinners are lashed between minchah and maariv, and they say "Vehu Rachum" during the lashing (as per Makkot 22b), so the chazan also announces "Vehu Rachum" (Sefer HaManhig). Alternatively, because there is no korban tamid which maariv represents, but the tamid is supposed to atone, so we say "Vehu Rachum" instead (Pardes in the name of R' Eliezer ...


8

Shulchan Aruch 127:2 The Rema says that we say Sim Shalom any time we have a tefilah that is fitting for the blessing of the Kohanim to be included. This is based on the end of the discussion of the Shemoneh Esrey in Talmud Megillah 18. The Amidah should end with a longer and more specific blessing of Shalom to end the tefilah. Mishnah Berurah to 127:2 (...


8

The same people that went to shul at night on Shabbos went at night on Yom Tov. There are various reasons why there was no takana to say birchas me'ein sheva on Yom Tov. According to the Tur/Shulchan Orach in O'Ch 487, we don't say me'ein sheva on Pesach because it is Leil Shimurim, a protected night, so we don't need to worry about the dangers in siman 268....


8

תפלת ערבית is mentioned in the Tosefta Berakhot (3:6), and several places in the Talmud, e.g. Berakhot 4b, 6b, 26b, etc. תפלת מעריב does not appear in Hazal (at least none of the works included in the Bar-Ilan database). However, it is a common term among Ashkenazim, and indeed, the term is found in quite early Ashkenazi works. These include the Mahzor ...


8

As I wrote here, the Talmud states that Hashkiveinu is not an interruption between geulah and tefillah because since it was ordained by the Sages as part of the blessings for Keriat Shema it is as if it is an extended geulah. Berachot 4b דאי לא תימא הכי שחרית היכי מצי סמיך והא אמר רבי יוחנן בתחלה אומר ה׳ שפתי תפתח ולבסוף הוא אומר יהיו לרצון אמרי פי אלא ...


7

The Talmud asks this question on Brachot 33a and concludes that one still says Attah Chonantanu in Shemone Esrei even if he already recited Havdala on a cup of wine, because the Havdalah in Shemone Esrei was the original and therefore primary form of Havdala enacted. This ruling is brought in the Tur OC 294 and cited in the Mishnah Berurah there :1.


7

That comment of Rash"i is quoting from the G'mara (Sanhedrin 86), which derives that [although the words plainly mean "do not steal"] based on the hermeneutic device called davar halamed me'inyano. The context of capital crimes in which "lo signov" appears implies that it too must be the capital crime of kidnapping. The meaning of the pasuk is therefore ...


7

The same rule applies both nights (ShA OC 422:1). (Indeed while this seems to be explicit in the Gemara (Brachot 30b), the Beit Yosef (ibid.) notes with amazement that the Orchot Chayim quotes two rabbis who disagreed and required going back on the second night.) Mishna Berura (ibid. sk 3) explains that each day of Rosh Chodesh doesn't affect the other as ...


7

Mishchas Shemen volume 2:123 asks this exact question. He concludes that he has to Daven Maariv again.


7

One can pray until dawn (alot hashahar), ideally (lechathila) one should do so before midnight (halachic midnight i.e., hatzot) (Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 70:2). Chabad.org explains The time for reciting maariv (the evening prayers) extends throughout the night. Nevertheless, the sages were concerned that people would delay the recitation of the ...


6

Biur Halacha 113 (hakoreah) says it is based on Divrei haYamim I 29:20: וַיֹּאמֶר דָּוִיד לְכָל-הַקָּהָל, בָּרְכוּ-נָא אֶת-יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם; וַיְבָרְכוּ כָל-הַקָּהָל, לַיהוָה אֱלֹהֵי אֲבֹתֵיהֶם, וַיִּקְּדוּ וַיִּשְׁתַּחֲווּ לַיהוָה, וְלַמֶּלֶךְ. And David said to all the congregation: 'Now bless the LORD your God.' And all the congregation blessed the ...


6

It is not a Nedavah; it is a Reshuth. There is a difference. What that difference is, I actually do not know well enough to articulate it. I have also heard, in the name of RJB"S, that he felt both men and women ought to (how strong that "ought" is also unclear to me) Daven three times a day.


6

Congregation Etz Chayim in Toledo, Ohio says them.


6

Besides what's already been mentioned, there are a few leniencies because of this, though I've never heard of your specific one. There's a much larger discussion in halakhic literature about how careful (or not) we are about davening maariv at the proper time, and the Rambam (3:7) believes that this is because Maariv is a reshut. The Beis Yosef (268:13) ...


6

If you really need to, you can say Maariv and Havdalah (omitting the blessing on the candle) from Plag HaMincha (1.25 hours before sunset) (ShA OC 293:3) just as much as you can say Maariv and Kiddush after that time on Friday. The blessing on the candle can be recited separately after nightfall. All labor remains forbidden until after nightfall (even after ...


6

The Shulchan Arukh (OC 487:1) rules this way, and the Magen Avraham there notes the reason is that the first night of Pesach is a Leil Shimmurim (cf. Exodus 12:42) ("a guarded night") and Mei'ein Sheva was only enacted because of dangers at night (so that no one would take too long praying and leave by himself and be harmed), but there is no need to worry ...


6

The idea that according to the technical law it is a reshut but that it has now been accepted as a chovah goes back at least to R. Isaac Alfasi: Rif Berachot 27b: והאידנא נהוג עלמא לשוייה חובה A century later Rambam already says that this was the custom among all Jews everywhere: Hilchot Tefilah 1:6 ואין תפלת ערבית חובה כתפלת שחרית ומנחה ואף ע"פ כן ...


5

The quoted gemoro (Brachot 33a) says: א״ל בתחלה קבעוה בתפלה העשירו קבעוה על הכוס הענו חזרו וקבעוה בתפלה והם אמרו המבדיל בתפלה צריך שיבדיל על הכוס At first they fixed havdolo in the prayer. When the people grew richer, they fixed it over a cup (of wine). When the people grew poor again, they fixed it in the prayer. And they said (I assume later when they ...


5

There are basically five schools of thought when approaching the issue of birkot keriat shema post-plag and pre-nightfall (assuming it is not tarti desatri which has, ummm, fewer) because it seems odd to say brachot on shema when you are seemingly not fulfilling the mitzva. They are: Rav Hai Gaon (quoted in Tur OC 235 and Rosh Brachot 1:1 and more): Daven ...


5

Bach (Orach Chaim 294) says that it refers back to מדע תורתך: through our knowledge of Hashem's Torah (besides general knowledge, אתה חונן לאדם דעת, which is equally true of Jews and non-Jews), we are enabled to perform the mitzvos of Hashem's will. On the other hand, Seder Avodas Yisrael (R. Seligman Baer) states that it is simply a copyist's or printer's ...


5

Based on msh210's answer to Missing Barchu at Maariv that there is no benefit in saying Borchu at the end of Maariv then it is better to Daven with Kavana.


5

Rabbi Shnuer Zalman of Liadi (the "Alter Rebbe" of Lubavitch) asks this question (Mamarey Admur Hazaken 5565 vol. 1 pg. 238) and explains as follows: "Moshe" here refers not to the individual by that name, but rather the level called "Moshe" that is present in every Jew. The discourse explains that on a superficial level, the Jewish people were considered ...


5

R' Sh'lomo Zalman Auerbach indicated that it would be acceptable to rely upon an alarm for eating if the alarm is functional, although it should not be relied upon to wake oneself from sleep (Halichos Sh'lomo, T'filla 2:12). R' Bentzion Abba Sha'ul also indicated it would be acceptable to rely upon an alarm clock for eating, provided that the person ...


5

Vehu Rachum is recited as some sort of Kaparas Haavonos/forgiveness). See Tur and B"Y OC 237 which bring earlier sources and reasons for this, based on the above (forgiveness). I did not see anyone who tied this in to Barchu. The reason for the error you observe may be due to the Poskim who say that it should be said before Barchu, and people misread it as ...


4

To add to the opinions already brought: From the Taz (O"C 236:2) it sounds like it is said even when one is not praying it with the tzibbur. He says: ועל פי זה נ"ל מי שבא לב"ה אחר שהתחילו הצבור להתפלל יתפלל ביחידות מנחה וקורא ק"ש וברכותיה עד שומר עמו ישראל לעד והצבור מתחילין להתפלל ערבית יוכל תכף להתפלל עמהם ופסוקים דברוך ה' לעולם אמן יראו עינינו ...


4

I do not know about Teaneck, but the following is a list of shuls that I know about that say ma'arovith in the New York area. All these minyonim say the Ashkenaz (German) version printed in the Rödelheim machzor. Ma'arovith is recited on all yomim tovim with the exception of Rosh haShonoh and Yom Kippur. According to the Frankfurt, A.M. custom they are ...


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