11

It is mentioned in the Igeres Hagra וכל רגע ורגע שהאדם חוסם פיו זוכה בשבילו לאור הגנוז שאין מלאך ובריה יכולים לשער


11

Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach is quoted in Halichos Shlomo (page 98 note 20) saying that the minhag for the mispallelim to raise ones voice when saying "V'sein Tal Umatar Lebracha" and other similar additions (including Yaaleh Veyavo) in the middle of the Amidah with the intention of reminding others is incorrect, as it is disrepectful to G-d, for it is ...


10

You shouldn't try to "out do" the loud davener since that would just disturb even more people. Re how to correct the person. This is the category of rebuke that is mentioned in Lev 19:17. The Rabbis and the sources spend considerable time examining how to properly rebuke a person. Some ideas in reference to your situation: I'd do it privately with the ...


8

The custom of reciting Avinu Malkeinu repetitively by the chazzan and congregation is brought in Mateh Efrayim (תרב סי"ג), without any explanation. [The Mateh Efrayim himself writes to begin from א"מ קרע, however the Ktzey Hamateh at the bottom brings the custom to start from א"מ החזירנו בתשובה]. The only reason I could find is mentioned in שער יששכר מאמר ...


7

I personally feel very strongly that nothing should be done. I was once guilty of this about 12 years ago (only once, I believe, though I could be wrong). The reason I was guilty of it was that I was so wrapped up in my Tefillah, with such focused concentration, that I simply didn't realize I was being too loud. Unfortunately, the rebuke I received made me ...


6

Harav Musafi Shelit"a says in his lecture (Ana Bechoah) that the entire point is to have the special intentions while reciting the words. However, the Haye Adam doesn't hold of people in that generation (Kal Wahomer now) intending on the Arizal's intention. Of course, as the Ben Ish Hai writes in his Sefer Emunat Atich, before intending the Kabalistic ...


5

When there is a Zimmun, what is supposed to happen is the leader recites the entire Bentching aloud on the group's behalf and everyone else listens with the intent to fulfill their obligation and replies Amen at the relevant places. If one is unsure of his ability to pay attention to the leader the whole time (this is common), he should recite in an ...


5

You may encounter opinions that recommend not doing that, based on kabbalistic sources: Pri Etz Hayyim - Sha'ar Ha-Amidah - Chapter 2 אין להתפלל תפלה שבלחש בקול רם, כי בלחש אנו מעמידין יעקב ורחל בנ"ה דז"א, ובחזרה אנו רוצין להעלותה יותר למעלה עד חו"ג, יעקב בחסד ורחל בגבורה. ודע, כי בהיותן בנצח הוד, ששם אחיזת הקליפות, לכן צריך התפלה בלחש, שלא ...


5

The answer of @Shoel U'Meshiv is true and good. I just want to show the inner side of this Halacha. SA OC 236, 2 אין לספר בין גאולה דערבית לתפלה ואף הנוהגין לומר שמונה עשרה פסוקים ויראו עינינו אין להפסיק בין יראו עינינו לתפלה ומיהו מה שמכריז שליח ציבור ראש חדש בין קדיש לתפלת ערבית לא הוי הפסק כיון שהוא צורך התפלה וכן יכול לומר ברכו להוציא מי שלא שמע ולא ...


4

See the following explanation of the Abarbenel who unites the explanation of the Talmud with the explanation of the Midrash and resolves your question. He explains that "baruch shem..." refers to a deeper understanding of the unity of God. This is why it is reserved for angels and Moshe did not want to say it in the Torah. However, Yaackov, speaking ...


4

My understanding is that the concern of avsha milta is (at least primarily) the public nature of the (albeit automated) melocho of grinding. In this case, there would seem to be no such problem since air-drying would not seem to be a melocho. (I believe that even according to the Yerushalmi that has a strict and broad interpretation of the melocho of ...


3

In the laws of Rosh Hashana The Mechaber mentions that even though a whole year one should not daven with a raised voice on Rosh Hashana it is permitted since people are davening from a Machzor and the noise wont disturb them. The source is PisKei Tosfos in Rosh HaShana. Not the Gemorah itself. That being said the Mishna Brura says that still one should ...


3

Maimonides's commentary on Avos explains that when someone has a lot of words he will sin, after all, as it's impossible that among his words won't be one word that's inappropriate to say. He goes on to list five categories of speech: mitzva speech (like Torah study), forbidden speech (like false testimony), inappropriate but not outright forbidden ...


3

Ralbag explains that the reason for the silence was so the inhabitants not hear them. Thus, presumably, they could speak quietly, and the "וְלֹא יֵצֵא מִפִּיכֶם דָּבָר" was overly emphatic in order to make sure they didn't speak loudly. (Note that that command to be quiet was not noted as having been fulfilled, and I have no reason to think that the entire ...


3

One should say blessings aloud (source coming soon, b'li neder, but I think it's Sefer HaBeracha WeHilchotea). However if one knows that the people around him won't answer amen he should say it quietly (Ben Ish Hai).


3

The only source that I could find is Likutei Maharich volume2 - page 82 where he mentions that our Minhag is that all those who hear Havdalla say Layehudim out loud. He does not give a reason for this Minhag.


3

The minhag at my Sephardic community is to say Ga'al Yisra'el out loud, then say "Ad-nai" (as part of "... sefatai tiftah...") in an audible undertone so that the members of the tzibbur would start their amidah right away.


2

The Maharal in Nesiv HaAvoda says that baruch shem kevod is an expression of pure spirituality. Therefore to say it would be inappropriate because we are physical, having a body. To not say it would be painful to the spiritual side of us, the soul. Therefore, we whisper it. Yaakov, who was talking for himself and was completely holy, was able to say it. ...


2

The Rishonim (Rabbeinu Yehuda Ben Yakar, Rabbeinu Yonah, among others) describe these Kedushos as סיפור דברים, relating what is happening (as opposed to Kedusha D'Amida, in repetition of Shemoneh Esrei, which is our own Kedusha - where we say נקדש, let us be mekadesh). The lines between serve as explaining what is happening - they give the context to who ...


2

See the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן עח - הלכות קריאת ספר תורה in סעיף ד where he mentions all instances of where the Ba'al Kri'ah (Torah reader) needs to lower his voice. Regarding Bechukosai he says: גַם הַקְּלָלוֹת שֶׁבְּפָּרָשַׁת בְּחֻקֹּתַי וּפָרָשַׁת כִּי תָבֹא קוֹרִין בְּקוֹל נָמוּךְ. וְאֶת הַפָּסוּק וְזָכַרְתִּי אֶת בְּרִיתִי יַעֲקֹב קוֹרִין ...


2

The Rama in Orach Chaim siman 132 seif 1 says that in Uvah LeTzion (kedusha de'sidra) the parts of the kedusha that are translated into Aramaic should not be said aloud. The Mishnah Berurah sk4 says that the Aramaic should be said as an individual since "everything that is in Aramaic should not be said berabim" The perush Matok MiDvash explains the reason ...


2

I'm "extraplocombing" (extrapolating and combining) the answers from your referenced question regarding Shacharit with Mishnah Brura 232:2. See Sha'arei Tzion #4, who points out that since Ma'ariv is reshut (not obligatory) we are not as concerned about the requirement of smichat g'ulah litfilah (loose translation - connecting the concept of redemption as ...


2

This a touchy issue. First there is this publication by Tzeirei Chasidea Viznitz that speaks strongly against those who want to stop the practice of saying Pesukei Dezimro loud and writes that with the exception of the Amidah, davenning is to be loud and so it sweetens judgement: וחז"ל העידו בר"ה (דף ט"ז) דצעקה הוא אחד מדברים המבטלין רוע הגזירה, והפייט ...


2

The Shla (in mitzvat tefillin) wrote in the name of the Zohar (Emor) that "le-shem yichud Kudsha Brikh Hu..." should be said, as brought in the siddurim. This is agreed to by the Artzot Ha-chayim (25, Ha-me'ir La-aretz 29) and others (see, e.g., the introduction of the Shev Shematta). In contrast, the Noda Bi-yehuda wrote (OC vol. II, 107 and YD vol. I, 93)...


2

Paragraph 1 of your question quotes Rambam Hilchot Tefilla 12:11. This refers to reading the Torah as is seen from the first halocho: Tefilah and Birkat Kohanim - Chapter Thirteen Halacha 1 Moses, our teacher, ordained that the Jews should read the Torah publicly on the Sabbath and on Monday and Thursday mornings, so the [people] would never have ...


2

OU Israel publishes Torah Tidbits, "the largest weekly English-language Torah publication in Israel." This tti tidbits edition says Something that really shouldn't be done - anytime - is to say things out loud in the middle of one's silent Amida. Many people think they are being helpful by saying Morid HaTal or Yaaleh V'Yavo or Al HaNisim or ...


1

Speaking לשון הרע which does not actually get heard can be likened to someone to desires to commit a sin but then is thwarted by someone or something. Strictly speaking, the Torah prohibits actions rather than thoughts. However, most Torah commentators (Ibn Ezra, Sforno, Malbim, Hertz) treat lusting to sin as a weaker form of commiting the sin itself. And ...


1

Among the many other miracles that occurred in that period, there were times when the entire nation was simultaneously able to hear Moses speaking. This is how we understand when the verse says that the entire congregation of Israel assembled and was addressed. These miracles are known as המועט המחזיק את המרובה - the small that contains the many. This means ...


1

The Gemara in Shabbos 12b mentions that one shouldn't daven in Aramaic because angels don't understand Aramaic. The angels "carry" the prayers to G-d, and if they don't understand them, they won't take them because they don't want to take unacceptable prayers. However, in prayers which are a davar sheb'kedusha, the prayers are listened to directly by ...


1

I don't know about the deaf person, but in all the other cases you would be able to answer amen. This is because in all these cases you know what brocha is being said, it is not said to exempt the public from their obligation (e.g. חזרת הש"ץ), and you do not intend to exempt yourself from saying the brocha by answering amen. If any of these conditions do not ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible