8

In C:M 259:1 the Aruch haShulchan says it starts once you see the object. However, there are conditions to be met. For example: In C"M 263:2 he says that mitzvas asei of hashavas aveidah applies even to a dignified personality once he picks it up or moves it. Otherwise, Mr. VIP is exempt.


8

The Taz in CM 262/6 asks your question. He gives two answers: The Rambam is talking about where we know he did not despair, such as when we heard him say something to indicate he thought it was in his house. However, if we don't know if he despaired, such as finding money in the street where we assume people check for their money, then it has nothing to do ...


7

Babba Metziah 28b - 29a discusses the issue of reimbursing the finder for his expenses in caring for the lost animal. The idea is based on Devarim 22:2. The Mishnah points out that the verse tells us to return the lost object to its owner. So, infers the Mishnah, there must be something left to return. Therefore, an animal is not kept under the finder's ...


5

You may keep it for yourself. The Braita states (for example, here) that a lost item which is unobtainable to the owner - such as a sunken treasure - is automatically subject to ye'ush (see below) and is free to take. There is no legal obligation to return it to its former owner. Ye'ush means the owner gave up hope of ever getting it back and thereby loses ...


5

This is a complex question and you need to ask a rav if this had practical implications. If this is a theoretical question, one might learn from the laws of lost objects (asheivat aveida), second chapter of Bava Metsia (21a and ff), based on Devarim 22:1-3 If you see your brother's animal, you shall not hide from it; you must return it to the owner. If ...


5

The Business Halacha Institute discusses your very question about a Jewish newspaper: “The magazine was aware that your subscription expired, yet knowingly sent additional issues,” explained Rabbi Dayan. “The Gemara (B.M. 23b, 25b, 31a) teaches that there is no obligation of hashavas aveidah when someone is knowingly reckless with his property (...


5

Yes. Lost property belongs to the heirs. The Shulchan Aruch - Choshen Mishpat - סימן רס - המוצא דבר שמוכח שהנח שם - mentions by the way that lost property belongs to the heirs. אוֹ שֶׁהָיָה יוֹרֵשׁ שֶׁאָנוּ טוֹעֲנִין לוֹ, שֶׁמָּא שֶׁל אָבִיו הָיָה (Normally, one has to claim that a found item originally belonged to one. For example, an item is found in ...


5

The practice of tying a knot to find a lost object is found in wiccan practice , and may have originated in ancient Greek culture Furthermore, even if these foreign practice somehow snuck into Jewish forklore, doing 'spells' , or 'charms' , or anything of the sort, is inconsistent with the Torah: When you have come to the land the Lord, your G-d, is ...


5

In your case of a non-Jew giving someone equipment for a job, that equipment was always the property of the non-Jew. It was never lost. Keeping it against the owner's will is theft. The fact that the owner is a non-Jew doesn't make it any less of a theft. It is true that the gemara in Sanhedrin and the Rishonim discuss whether one should return an item lost ...


3

In CM 263.2 the topic treated is the lav "לא תוכל להתעלם". This lav has exceptions when there is a problem of honor. "פעמים שאתה מתעלם, זקו ואינו לפי כבודו". The sugia is in BM 30ab. The same reason that leads us to say "אתה מתעלם" leads us to push out the asse of "השב תשיבם" If you have already picked up the object, there is still Mitsva "השב תשיבם" ...


3

The Rambam (Aveidah 11:13, also see Choshen Mishpat 263:1) writes: "The following rule applies when a person finds a sack or a large basket. If he is a sage or a respected elder, who would not usually carry such articles himself, he is not obligated to concern himself with them. "He should judge his status in the following way. If the article were his own ...


2

From a Halakhic standpoint, there appears to be two questions here: Who has Halakhic possession, and thus liability, for the item? When does the customer legally possess the item, and thereby becomes responsible for it? Is it upon payment, or upon receipt? What is the Halakhic status of the postal carrier? Are they a Shaliach (Messenger)? Shomer (...


2

In short, yes. You seem to be talking of a case where someone found a lost object that had identifying marks and some degree of value, and there was no reason to believe that the owner gave up hope of finding it before you picked it up. That would give the finder the requirement to guard it which, at that point, can't be nullified by the owner giving up ...


2

Shulchan Aruch, in Choshen Mishpat 291, says: [:1] An unpaid watchman is exempt, with an oath, for theft and loss and is liable to pay only for breach of duty. [:2] An unpaid watchman is someone who was given money, items, an animal, or anything to watch and who accepted the responsibility to watch it.… And in 294: [:2] …If [the watchman] claimed it was ...


2

There is a well known principle in Gemoro that: (My translation (and understanding) of the link): אדם רוצה בקב שלו מתשעה קבין של חבירו See Bovo Metzia 38a Man wants his one measure (of produce) more than the nine measures of his friend The gemoro explains that the nature of man is, that he prefers to have a single thing created by his ...


2

The source of the mitzvah is Dvorim 22 (1-3). You shall not see your brother's ox or sheep straying, and ignore them. [Rather,] you shall return them to your brother. But if your brother is not near you, or if you do not know him, you shall bring it into your house, and it shall be with you until your brother seeks it out, whereupon you shall ...


2

I am adding an additional assumption that the item has some identifying mark that would more likely obligate you to return it. According to most opinions, an item have no identifiable markings does not need to be returned. However, if you know exactly who the owner is, you MAY need to return it, anyway, in all circumstances. Having said this, based on what ...


2

Assuming the object is of minimal value (sufficient that the owner won't abandon it) and has simanim (signs allowing someone to recognize the object), the mitzva of asheivat aveida (returning a lost object) is to announce (traditionally in a place where people congregate, e.g., in a marketplace or synagogue) you found an object (without all the details so ...


2

Patience...... I skimmed the gemara looking for the answer to my question, but accidentally skipped it! Tosfos Ri"d on the Mishna tipped me off to check again. Gitin 27b: ת''ר איזהו שלא לאלתר רבי נתן אומר ששהה כדי שתעבור שיירא ותשרה ר''ש בן אלעזר אומר כדי שיהא אדם עומד ורואה שלא עבר שם אדם ויש אומרים שלא שהה אדם שם רבי אומר כדי לכתוב את הגט רבי יצחק ...


2

According to this article (Q 33) you would need to return it. It makes no difference if it was delivered by mail or hand-delivered: If mail was mistakenly delivered to you, you should give it to the addressee or return it to the sender. This comment does not appear to be sourced within the article and is mentioned with regards to gifts sent in the mail....


2

We are not required to treat gentiles better than they treat each other. According to Roman Law a finder obtained ownership of the object. Even now there is a slogan "finders keepers, losers weepers". However, there is a requirement to do a kiddush Hashem and an aveira to do a chillul Hashem (see Yerushalmi Bava Mezia 2:5 in Vilna ed. 8a regarding Shimon ben ...


2

As context, there is indeed a Gemara (Sanhedrin 76b) which prohibits returning a lost item to a gentile. The gemara seems to assume that it would be adding to the property that goyim stole from Jews. Rashi explains “One who returns a lost item to a gentile — he made a gentile equal to a Jew, and shows that he does not consider the returning of lost items a ...


2

Nesivos Hamishpat (Choshen Mishpat) 260,6 11 (as the questioner correctly assumed) based on the Shulchan Aruch says that a minor can never give up hope and if it is known that a lost even without a siman (sign) belonged to a minor, one must return the item. ואם היו של יתומים שאינם בני מחילה אסורים - לפ"ז ה"ה באבידה בדבר שאין בו סי' כשנתוודע לו ...


1

Let's pick one particular case: suppose I find keys with a tag that says FIRST AVE PAGAN TEMPLE -- VAN #2. Practically today, Jews are obligated to return lost property to anyone, including pagans; if nothing else, think of the reputation of God's name, and what goes around comes around, help-wise. So if the tag said Property of Bob the Plumber (who I know ...


1

One classical halachic case is one of accidentally switching items (from here) One who [accidentally] took the wrong item while at the house of a mourner or while participating in a festive meal, may not use the item [that he accidentally took] and doing so is considered stealing. Regarding the object being possibly forbidden to be returned to non-...


1

At first glance, one would probably say groceries can be considered lost items without simanim as groceries that one purchased from the store are going to look the same as the stuff in the store. As such, there would be no obligation to even attempt to find their owner and the finder could keep them. This may not be exactly true, though, as the unique ...


1

This question is good, first, if you look carefully the Rashi, you will realize that the person in question does not accept to distinguish between Samaritan and Jew concerning the Mitsva to return. So, if he returned the Samaritan's lost by extra duty (in a duty free way) there is no problem. The words of Rashi are : והמחזיר אבידה לכותי - השווה וחבר ...


1

In your case this is not a lost item, to take it is simply robbery, not a problem of found objects. The carpet luggage. is a place in which objects are placed, and have not been forgotten, as Tside Reshut Harabim. It is Derech Hinuach. If you find a battered suitcase along the side of a highway, it is a found object, it has fallen from a car. To take a coat ...


1

As was mentioned in the comments, @gaagu answered to a similar question that: Rabbi Isaac Yosef in ילקוט יוסף writes to the effect that a public sign can effect the transfer of ownership of a lost object to the synagogue: מן הראוי שבמקומות ציבוריים, כמו ישיבה ומוסדות צבור, הנהלת הישיבה או המוסד יכתבו הודעה במקום גלוי, שלפי תקנת המוסד כל מי שלא יבא לקחת ...


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