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No. In his work called Chelek, Maimonides writes that those who take Midrashim literary are "fools," while those who reject them out of hand are also "fools." Midrashim are imaginative parables, sermons designed to teach moral lessons. People should mine Midrashim for lessons about proper behavior.


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Midrashim do not tell true events In his work called Chelek, Maimonides writes that those who take Midrashim literary are "fools," while those who reject them out of hand are also "fools." Midrashim are imaginative parables, sermons designed to teach moral lessons. People should mine Midrashim for lessons about proper behavior.


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How to really understand the Bible Good question. For one, anthropomorphic statements about G-d should always be taken figuratively as metaphors. For example, Maimonides understood the "Garden of Eden" story to be a parable. Ralbag understood that the sun did not really stand still for Joshua at Gibeon, this was a feeling Joshua felt "as if" the sun stood ...


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The simple answer is that this determination is not much different than other determination about the meaning of a text, which is made on a case-by-case basis. One has to use logical analyses of the information presented, both inherently (regarding clues in the text itself) and in a broader context, including whether or not there is a relevant and reliable (...


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