11

Shulchan Aruch O.C. 672:2 שכח או הדד ולא הדליק [....] ומיהו הני מילי לכתחילה; אבל אם עבר זה הזמן ולא הדליק, מדליק והולך כל הלילה. ואם עבר כל הלילה ולא הדליק, אין לו תשלומין If one forgot and didn't light, or purposefully didn't light [....] however, this is only lechatchila; if [the end of sunset] has passed and one didn't light, they should light ...


9

Your question was asked of the Ohr Somayach "Ask the Rabbi" who answers about three things: 1) Extinguishing the havdalah candle immediately after havdalah 2) Extinguishing it in wine 3) Not blowing out candles in general On 2, he says, ""Wine spilling like water," says the Talmud, "is a sign of blessing." In order to start the week off right, we ...


9

Try this article at Chabad.org, which quotes (in translation) the classic sources on the subject. Briefly, it's the idea that Hashem first created the ten sefiros as the "world of Tohu," as independent entities, where each one is is exclusively "thus and no other way" - i.e., chesed ("kindness") is pure chesed, gevurah ("severity") is pure gevurah, etc.; ...


9

Two answers from http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/106/Q1/: In the name of Rabbi Yaakov Yisrael Kanievsky (the 'Steipler'): There's an angel whose name is the same as the sound produced when you blow out with force. According to Kabbalistic tradition, it's improper to make use of the names of holy angels. Many people, therefore, extinguish candles by hand ...


8

Based on my research (see below), Christmas lights are entirely secular, and therefore there is no problem whatsoever with looking at or enjoying Christmas lights. Even if the lights are not entirely secular, there still wouldn't be a problem. The Shach (Shulchan Aruch 142:15), based on Tosfos and the Rosh, writes that it is permitted to derive benefit ...


8

Based on Shulchan Aruch Harav, Section 624:4 - 624:5. Just like on Shabbos, after Yom Kippur we make a Bracha on fire since we were not permitted to use fire before, and it is like a new entity to us. After Shabbos we may use new fire because this is how fire was initially brought into the world after Shabbos Adam took two stones and made fire and made the ...


8

Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 298:3-4 says: The person needs to be close enough to the fire to potentially benefit from it, should he so choose (It is described there as being able to sort money by the light of the torch). The Mishna Berurah there (S"K 13) says that if one who is listening wants to fulfill his obligation, he too must be that close. Our ...


8

Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (Meoray Eish and Minchas Shlomo 14) sides that technically as far as the laws of Muktzah are concerned it is permitted. However in a footnote he writes "All what I have written is only a discussion and not to be relied on, for all of Israel refrained all these years from moving an electric light on Shabbos and it appears as uvdin ...


7

I hope that this is more helpful. I am a rabbi in Birmingham. When we have tornadoes which knock out power we recommend people use light sticks. There is no heat generated, the light is a simple chemical reaction. breaking the inner glass is not mekalkel as what you are doing is not destructive it is in fact constructive. Think of cutting a cucumber for ...


7

Despite the fact that everyone seems to assume you light from left to right (don't take my word for it; try a simple Google search!) there actually is a difference of opinion. The following information is taken directly from Halachipedia (with some very minor editing by me for formatting purposes): Maharik (Responsa 183, cited by Beit Yosef 676:5) ...


7

This ceremony is an American phenomena, it was invented by caterers and is the only of many creative ceremonies to have "stuck" from the early days of American Bar Mitzvah celebrations in ceremonial halls. You will find it across the spectrum of Jewish groups (including some Orthodox) but will generally only find it in ceremonial halls and not in synagogues ...


7

This can be found in Rashi, Onkelos, and Ibn Ezra. To cite a post about this on Balashon: The word tzohar (or tsohar) appears only here in the Tanach and there are a number of explanations for the meaning: window (Onkelos, Rashi, Ibn Ezra) - based on tsohorayim צהרים - noon. The light of noon is compared to the light entering the ark via the window. Also ...


7

No, one cannot. Mythbusters determined experimentally that earwax candles are not effective: The skin cells, hair, fatty acids and cholesterol contained in earwax combust quickly and at different rates, which means the icky substance won't stick around long enough to keep the flame on the wick. Given that an earwax candle won't burn, it would not be ...


6

It is permissible to enjoy Christmas lights. (See Ben Ish Hai S"B Mase 2 who says that they don't have the din of idol worship, Shulhan Aruch Yoreh Deah 142:15 with Shach). The Ben Ish Hai texts also quote Rav Avraham Danzig in Hochmat Adam 87:1 which explains that the names of their festivals do not have the same kinds of restrictions as the actual names of ...


6

Mishnah Berurah (672:1, and in Beur Halachah ibid. ד"ה לא מאחרים) says that it depends: If you usually daven Maariv before nightfall, then prepare the menorah ahead of time, and light immediately after Maariv (so you don't miss the proper time for lighting). If you usually daven it after nightfall, then it's better to light first and then daven. In the ...


6

Ben Ish Hai Pinehas Shana Bet 18 (quoting the Arizal's Shaar Ruach Hakodesh), Shalme Hayim 499, Zivhe Sedek 116:74, and HaBayit HaYehudi 10:29:10.


6

The Gemara there explains: אמר רב חסדא אסור לו לאדם שישמש מטתו ביום שנאמר (ויקרא יט, יח) ואהבת לרעך כמוך מאי משמע אמר אביי שמא יראה בה דבר מגונה ותתגנה עליו It is forbidden to have relations during the day, as the verse says "You shall love your fellow like yourself." What does this imply? (Meaning, how does that verse imply such a prohibition?) ...


5

http://www.thehalacha.com/attach/Volume3/SpecialIssue.pdf In places where it is hard to check one may use a flashlight. (Refer to Natei Gavriel 1:17:19, Chazzon Ovadia Pesach 1:page 138:2:footnote 13 in depth, Otzer Ha’halochos page 116:12, Horav Eider Shlita’s sefer on Hilchos Pesach page 86, Shevet Ha’Levi 1:136:page 137, Shevus Yitzchok Pesach ...


5

TorahLab give the following explanation: On Yom Kippur we are celebrating the fact that we hadn’t used fire all day. In this way Yom Kippur is different from all other Jewish holidays, on which the use of fire is permitted. So it is therefore appropriate to use a flame that had ‘rested’ all day. It had been burning before Yom Kippur, had not been used ...


5

In the sefer Rishumei Aahron(Rav Aahron Felder) chelek 2 pg 27 he brings from Rav Moshe that it is mutar to move a lamp(with a cord) on Shabbas lzorech gufo and mimkomo.


5

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein actually addressed a similar concern, Maris Ayin with regards to your lights on timers -- an onlooker will see your dining room suddenly -- click! -- lit up. He allowed it; so I'd assume the same should apply here.


5

Perhaps surprisingly, this is discussed in Reshimot Shiurim of Rav Soloveitchik to Berakhot 34a. He writes that the "hidden light" is the light of knowledge that is found in the Torah and will be fully expressed in the future epoch. Particularly, it refers to an understanding of the underlying philosophy of Halakha. והסוד שבההלכה היא השקפת העולם של ההלכה -...


5

As Dr. Shmuel mentioned in a comment, this section is quoted here on page 24 footnote 86. There he elaborates: ר' שלמה קלוגר מצא שני כוונים אחרים של היתר ללמוד לאור הנר בליל שבת. התיר בנר שבעששית זכוכית, כיון שהזכוכית מהוה היכר לאיסור ההטיה (שו"ת האלף לך שלמה או"ח קט"ו) והתיר בנר שיש לו "שם לוואי", כגון 'נר שעוה' או 'מיללעליכט', כיון שהוא נבדל מנר ...


4

אליה רבה תרי:ד מצאתי בספר אמרכל מצינו בתרגום מגילה במלשינות של המן, בליל צומא רבה מדליקין נרות סכום בניהם סכום אבהתהון ע"כ The Elya Rabba quotes the Amarkal who quotes a targum on Esther (I can't seem to find it in our targum) that the Jews lit candles "according to the number of their ancestors". I'm guessing the context is regarding Yom Kippur but it'...


4

http://www.chabad.org.il/Questions/Item.asp?ArticleID=588&CategoryID=68 The source for lighting a candle for a departed soul - is from Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi - who authored the Mishnayos - who commanded his family to leave a candle lit. Rabbenu Bachya explains that the soul has a sublime pleasure from candlelight.


4

The Ketzos HaShulchan Siman 29:2 and the Badei HaShulchan Siman 29:2 explains that we keep a Ner Tamid lit for Kovod Shomayim and that it is a Zecher L'Mikdash where there always remained one candle burning on the Western side (Ner Ma'aravi). Regarding having more than one light today - in the Shuls I frequent that is not the case. I have seen some Shuls ...


4

Nitei Gavriel Hilcho Aveilus-2 65:4 brings down this Minhag in the name of the Ruach Chaim 367 and others.


4

Nitei Gavriel Chanuka 40:2 says that the one who lights in the Shul stands with his back to the South and his face to the North. On the first night he lights the candle all the way on his right. On the subsequent nights he lights the new candle and proceeds to his right.


4

Rav Moshe Mintz, a posek in Ner Israel, told me that you can ideally use any light that can be focused in one area (as opposed to the sunlight or the main light in a room, which lights up the entire room), as the purpose of the candle at night is to contrast with the dark in the rest of the room.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible