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32

As Danny Schoemann says, it's a ketubah. A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. The text in this form matches the standard text presented and translated on this Chabad.org page. People Groom: Yehuda Leib, son of Avraham Noah. He is also a Levi Bride: Toiba Rachel, daughter of Yisrael Arye Witness: Aharon Leib, son of Moshe the Levi Witness: Abba David, ...


13

The religious implication of this ketubah is that it may be possible to use it to establish, in a Jewish court, certain facts about the listed bride and groom: That they were Jewish. On this basis, their children would also be Jewish, as would any children of their daughters, of their daughters' daughters, etc. That the man was a Levi. On this basis, he, ...


7

Quick answer: Yes and no. Any religious or doctrinal aspects of a kesubah itself cannot be enforced under American laws because of Constitutional issues involving the free exercise and establishment clauses to the First Amendment. However, courts have and can enforce strictly secular sections of kesubahs or separate secular agreements between a Jewish ...


7

I don't believe there is a single set one, but a few with minor variations. Some of the classic Tenaim texts were collected in Sefer Nachalas Shiv'a, and another version was drafted by Rav Moshe Feinstein more recently. To the best of my knowledge, Rav Moshe's is the most commonly used in non-Hassidic Ashkenazi communities. (There are of course earlier ...


6

See the Fall 2010 issue of Tradition, with the article entitled "A Marital Agreement to Mediate" by R. David Joseph Mescheloff and also the letters section of the Spring 2011 issue, with letters by R. Howard Jachter and the author. The dispute is whether R. Moshe Feinstein and R. Soloveitchik supported the use of prenuptial agreements (according to R. ...


6

Rav Asher Weiss writes in his approbation of the RCA Prenup about supporting the RCA Prenup from the Nachlas Shiva document: לענ"ד אין זה ענין לני"ד דנראה לכאורה דתקנה זו עיקרה ויסודה באמת להבטיח את קיום האשה והספקת מזונותיה, ולא כאמצעי לאלץ את הבעל לגרש את אשתו, וא"כ אין מזה ראיה לנידון דידן.‏ In my humble opinion this is not related to our case ...


6

Sending an "affidavit" it is a dispute between Rashi and Rabbeinu Tam. Devarim 19:15: לא יקום עד אחד באיש לכל עון ולכל חטאת בכל חטא אשר יחטא על פי שני עדים או על פי שלשה עדים יקום דבר Rashi: ולא שיכתבו עדותם באגרת וישלחו לבית דין And not that they write their testimony in a letter and send it to Beis Din Tosefos Bava Basra 40a (continued from ...


6

'3. Is easy, mi shebeirachs are done with the mother's name. '1. If he goes by a particular name you can often stick with it, but if he didn't have one, or if you're dealing with legal documents ... '2. The Rabbinical Council of America handbook for rabbis says to use "so-and-so the son of [mother's name]." I spoke with one seasoned rabbi who said he's ...


5

Journal of the Beth Din of America 1:1, page 32: -3. Non- Jews: Tashbetz assumes that, technically speaking, the prohibition against litigating in secular court would apply even in the context of a non-Jewish adversary. However, one may assume that a non-Jew will not willingly appear before a beit din, and accordingly one may bring the non-Jew before ...


5

According to Rabbis Yonah Reiss and Ezra Schwartz (and the latter was reviewing a class given by Rabbi Ben-Haim), heter iska can be used for non-business loans. The reason is that the borrower has other assets, which he has decided not to sell off in order to fund whatever he is using this money for. As such, the retained assets are the investment that is ...


5

According to many poskim, a heter iska does not work in such situations. See The Laws of Ribbis, p.395. There are also many banks in America with some Jewish owners or investors, but that raises a separate issue of partially Jewish-owned corporations.


5

Igros Moshe Even HaEzer 4:90 says that it is a good idea L'Chatchila to have an English translation connected to the actual Kesuba.


5

The concept of "freedom of contract" exists in Jewish Law with limitations. Rambam formulated this concept as follows: "כל תנאי שבממון קיים". He mentions it in numerous places: הלכות אישות, פרק ו, הלכה י, ופרק טז, הלכה ח; הלכות שמיטה ויובל, פרק ט, הלכה י; הלכות מכירה, פרק יג, הלכה ג, ופרק יט, הלכה ח; הלכות שלוחין ושותפין, פרק ב, הלכה ג, ופרק ד, הלכה ג; ...


5

I don't know that it is necessarily a Chassidish custom, but it is an Israeli one. Some sources include Orchas Mishpat 1. Yabia Omer 3 Even HaEzer 13, Trumas HaDeshen 2:232, Rashba on Bava Basra 175a and Nahar Mitzrayim 192b. According to Rav Ovadiah Yosef who sums up most of these sources in his responsa in Yabia Omer the reason to to halakhically ...


5

this isn't a religious implication, but it could probably serve as document to help prove Jewish lineage if you were to ever consider Israeli citizenship (Aliyah). And maybe if you were looking for a Jewish name for a child, you might consider one of these names, or a variation in English, as is traditional to name a child after one of the ancestors. Names ...


5

Partial answer, as you asked about Ketobot and Gittin. From The Schechter Institute: 1.A number of major halakhic authorities ruled that for a female convert, one should write in the get: bat Avraham Avinu [daughter of Abraham our forefather] (Rabbi Wachs and Ba’er Heiteiv to Even Ha’ezer 129, subparag. 35 refer to Seder Haget 34:1; Maharashdam, No. ...


5

The Rambam writes how the Minhag of Klal Yisrael is to use Kesef or Shaveh Kesef, not Shtar; although, shetar is also an option. Rav Hershel Schachter (Kiddushin 5777 - Pesichah) quotes Prof. Simcha Assaf (from a book he found in his father's library) who thinks this is one of the Rambam's attacks on the Karaites, emphasizing how we believe in Torah Shebaal ...


4

The Aruch Hashulchan writes that one is allowed to write spare contracts. He says that we don't say that it looks like a lie (the scribe writes that someone borrowed money before it happened) unless there are witnesses signed there. However, he says that some say not to write the last part of the contract (the Toref). This is usually taken care of by not ...


4

Not only the k'suva is necessary: there's more to a marriage, in Judaism, than that. But it's true that you don't, according to Judaism, need a New-York-State-legal marriage to be considered married. Moreover, religious Jewish societal norms are such that religious Jews will generally consider you to be married if you are married according to Judaism and not ...


4

The book חוקת הגר (about which and about whose author, warning, I know nothing) writes (on page 22): גיורת שנתגרשה ורוצה להנשא שנית, יש לכתוב בכתובתה גיורתא דא שלא נשכח ייחוסה, ואין כבר צורך לכתוב מתרכתא דא כי בגיורת יודעים שהיא אסורה לכהן.‏ Or, in my own free translation: In the case of a female convert who was divorced and wants to remarry, one ...


4

Notarization is actually much more similar to Henpek - the symbol that Beis Din would put on a document to indicate that its signors were verified. See, for example, Bava Metzia 7b: ולא מיבעיא לא כתב ביה הנפק דאיכא למימר כתב ללות ולא לוה אלא אפי' כתב ביה הנפק דמקוים לא יחזיר ... Not only a document which does not have a "henpek," about which one ...


4

Even if such a database existed, in the case of the Gemara it would not have helped the purchaser. The Gemara (12b) sets up the concern of this case to be that the document was written, but then not given to the borrower until later, in which case a purchase made between the time it was written and the time it was given would in reality not be subject to ...


4

In the Bavli to that Mishna (Gittin 80a), 'Ula explains that the reason there was an enactment made to write the date according to the local government was "משום שלום מלכות" "to maintain peace with the government". Rashi explains that the governments would see we use their dating system and assume that we value their leadership. Accordingly, Rambam rules (...


4

The signature of a person on a contract or on any other document involved in any form of transaction between two or more parties is considered be an absolutely valid Halachic Kinyan. A person who has signed such a document may not back out of the agreement that he has signed without the express permission of the other party involved. The signature of a ...


4

Rabbi Dr. Ari Zivotofsky writes: The sale of chametz must be fully binding under Jewish law, and some authorities require that it meet local legal standards as well. However, this is one of the rare statements in that article that is not footnoted, so we have no clue who these authorities might be. In this comprehensive article by Rabbi Yosef ...


4

First you need to define what you mean by Evil Eye. More to the point, the Talmud does mention that a wife's tears can have a tragic effect on the husband's well being. E.g.: The Gemara in Kethuboth 62b cites the case of Rav Rechumi was arrived home late for his annual (Erev Yom Kippour) visit. His wife got so worried that she started crying, and he was ...


4

The tanaim is actually a legal contract between the parents of the bride and groom. It specifies the financial and other arrangements that both sets of parents have agreed to. Originally, this was done well before the actual wedding in order to formalize the contractual requirements. This could include details such as which seat in shul would be given to the ...


4

This is taken from Aryeh Kaplan's Made in Heavean, note 21. Giving a synopsis of the tenaim text history. Various forms are found in Nachalath Shiva 8-11; Rabbi Asher Anshil Greenwald, Kitzur Nachalath Shiva 8 (Ungvar, 1926); Rabbi Yitzchak Ohlbaum, Ezer Le Yitzchak 5:4 (Budapest, Rabbi Hyman E. Goldin, HaMadrikh (New York, 1939), p. 2. Older, obsolete ...


3

The source is אגדת אסתר ה׃ט. See page 30. The text there is: אני המן האגגי עבדו של מרדכי היהודי שנמכרתי לו בככר לחם אחת


3

Let's assume there were no oaths involved, simply a statement like "I will invest." Shulchan Aruch Choshen Misphat 204,7 spells out that if you commit to buy or sell, "you really should keep your word, and if you don't do so, shame on you for your lack of integrity; but the courts can't extract anything from you." Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes in Igros Moshe ...


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