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You might want to consider The Living Torah and The Living Nach. Here’s a link to the Wikipedia article discussing them.


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I can put a word in for Robert Alter's edition (link). Although it includes no Hebrew, it's a Jewish translation - and one of the first translations by a single individual rather than a committee - which preserves as much of the Hebrew poetry, wordplay and allusion as possible. There's also a short companion volume on the translator's technique.


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Your question can be understood by looking at what the Holy One, blessed be He answers to Moshe in Shemot 33:17: וַיֹּ֤אמֶר יְהוָה֙ אֶל־מֹשֶׁ֔ה גַּ֣ם אֶת־הַדָּבָ֥ר הַזֶּ֛ה אֲשֶׁ֥ר דִּבַּ֖רְתָּ אֶֽעֱשֶׂ֑ה כִּֽי־מָצָ֤אתָ חֵן֙ בְּעֵינַ֔י וָאֵדָעֲךָ֖ בְּשֵֽׁם׃ That G-d said He would connect (that the root of וָאֵדָעֲךָ֖ is ידע, like in Adam knew Chava) with ...


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Each occurence of these words ('see', 'panav' and 'achorai') must been understood individually and in context because they have multiple levels of meaning. The Rambam comments both passages and its wording: according to him, neither the notion of seeing, the notion of face and the back of Hashem are supposed to be understood literally, but metaphorically. ...


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