10

אוקימתא (from להקים - to put up) is putting a statement in a specific more elaborate way. In short, when there are two (or more) contradicting sources that bring seemingly opposite opinions, Ukimta is used to limit each statement's application to a specific, non-overlapping situation that eliminates the contradiction. For example, Brochos 45b: תני חדא ...


6

Rashi to Genesis 15:10 explains that it was the custom of those making a covenant to split an animal into pieces, and to then pass between the pieces. Rashi also refers us to Jeremiah 34:18-19 where this practice is explicitly mentioned: וְנָתַתִּי אֶת־הָאֲנָשִׁים הָעֹבְרִים אֶת־בְּרִתִי אֲשֶׁר לֹא־הֵקִימוּ אֶת־דִּבְרֵי הַבְּרִית אֲשֶׁר כָּרְתוּ לְפָנָי ...


5

Old French was simply the vernacular language of the great -perhaps the greatest- commentator of the Torah, RASHI, who lived in Troyes, France in the 12 th century CE. His most acknowledged skill was his capacity to explain each word, each sentence of Torah with a superior, yet unrivaled clarity.


5

From Yiddish Word of the Week here: Etymology: There seems to be a dispute about etymology here. Leo Rosten, in his Joys of Yiddish (p. 296; unfortunately not available online), argues that it derives from the Polish word for can, “puszka.” Thus, a pushke is simply “a little can or container kept in the home, often in the kitchen, in which money to be ...


4

I've seen a couple of sefarim bring down from a commentary called "Mekor Chesed" to Sefer Chasidim that "zachur latov" is based on the pasuk in I Kings 17:18, where the woman feared that Eliyahu was coming to cause her to be remembered for the bad, that her sins would be recalled. We therefore pray that when Eliyahu comes it should be for the good and that ...


4

In fact it is mentioned according to the Ramban Bereishis 49: 12 the word חכלילי means כחל. Also the word כחלת is mentioned in Yecezkel 23:40 which means painting of the eyes. Rashi:כחלת. מין צבע ושמו כחול וצובעות בו עיניהם אוקליר"א בלע"ז: It seems its more of a blackish color or dark color,which fits with many descriptions of the dye of techeiles (before ...


4

The Mishna Brura Orach Chaim 62,2 3 addresses these concerns: ועיין בספרי האחרונים דבימינו אף מצד הדין יש ליזהר שלא לקרותה בלשון אחר כ"א בלשון הקודש כי יש כמה וכמה תיבות שאין אנו יודעים איך להעתיקם היטב כגון תיבת ושננתם יש בו כמה ביאורים אחד לשון לימוד ואחד לשון חידוד כמו שאמרו חז"ל שיהו ד"ת מחודדין בפיך שאם ישאלך אדם דבר אל תגמגם ותאמר לו. וכן כמה וכמה ...


3

The Malbim in his Yair Ohr explains the difference between the 3 words שונא,אויב,צר. A שונא = a person(enemy) who hates someone in their heart only. A אויב = a person(enemy) who doesnt inflict harm personally for his name sake,but is happy when someone else does it. A צר = a person(enemy) who inflicts bad on others with their actions. It seems from this ...


3

An okimta (not okinta) is used generally to advocacy a sentence, generally a Mishna or a Berayita, which seems false or superfluous. From the Darke Hatalmud from Rabbi Yitschak Kampenton paragraph 4 There are two kinds of Okimta, the first is to reduce the scope of the sentence (contextualization), despite that it seems to be a general sentence to a ...


3

Rav Hirsch says that calling by name is this case expresses the setting up of the mission and purpose of the item which is called by the names involved. In any case, where Hashem dowes call something by a name it always expresses a mission, a calling for the one to be so called, as Abraham, Israel etc. It is accordingly here also to be taken in the ...


3

דָּתִי is a recent coinage; its first attestation listed by the Hebrew Language Academy is from 1851, so there is no possibility of a Talmudic source on it. The word is an adjective derived from the noun דָּת, which is much older, appearing already in the Bible in Esther (its Aramaic equivalent is also used in Ezra and Daniel). In the earlier books, it's ...


2

A very interesting question! First, it's hard to answer a question "Why there's no X in the Torah" in general, but according to the WIKI (in Hebrew), our ancestors didn't name the colors but instead refer to the similar substances. THe question is based on our "optical illusion" - כחול wasn't so important and wasn't in "wide usage" as it is to us. The ...


2

I'd like to clarify @JA's comment. The Torah uses the male form to describe the singular שבת as in Vayikra 23:32, and sometimes in female form as in Vayikra 23:3. However, the plural is always שבתות which has the feminine ending, as in Vayikra 23:16. There is no known place in Tanac"h that uses the word "shabbatim". I believe that Talmud follows the same ...


2

According to the Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew, based on the works of Rav Hirsch, the word שכר, “to get drunk, to express unreal thoughts” (p. 262) and the word שׂכר, “to compensate, to fill a void” (p. 278) are among a set of words which refer to different nuances of blocking or expressing movement. This set also includes סגר, “to close”; סכר, “...


2

In this 19th century Nusach Sefarad Machzor with Yidish instruction, the commentary at the bottom indicates that the word קנוסי is actually reffering to a קנס - Monetory fine, that one imposes upon oneself which he is not legally obligated to pay. Accordingly it is not referring to a Kinnui (Variation) of "קונם" which is a vow rendering an object forbidden, ...


1

It sounds like a variant of Tarsus which was a major historical city which still exists in modern day Turkey. The other spelling variant in Hebrew is תרשיש. That is also how it is listed in Jastrow. Here is the Wikipedia page giving some background.


1

In terms of your question "what does Esav soneh Ya'akov means", a Times of Israel article by R' Jonathan Muskat outlines 3 approaches re: this statement (2nd & 3rd approach are similar): 1) "The halacha is Esav will always hate Yaakov" Rav Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe, Choshen Mishpat 2:77) writes: כי צריך לידע שהשנאה לישראל מכל האומות היא ...


1

It seems that our Sages took the example of Yossef and his brothers for a model for שונא בראשית לז ד וַיִּרְא֣וּ אֶחָ֗יו כִּֽי־אֹת֞וֹ אָהַ֤ב אֲבִיהֶם֙ מִכָּל־אֶחָ֔יו וַֽיִּשְׂנְא֖וּ אֹת֑וֹ וְלֹ֥א יָכְל֖וּ דַּבְּר֥וֹ לְשָׁלֹֽם׃ Bereshit p37 4 And when his brothers saw that their father loved him more than any of his brothers, they hated him so that they ...


1

As people are too shy to post an answer, I'd dare to. Linguistically, it appears that all languages stemmed from sign-based languages , such as "Egyptian_hieroglyphs" and developed into "grapheme" based (letters) (see "Writing_system" WIKI). This is clearly pronounced in Hebrew with some words referring (and graphically resembling) to symbols, such as ב for ...


1

The word in both of these verses is שַׁ֚בְתִּי (with the same cantilation, even), which is pronounced SHAVti, and means "I have returned." The root is שוב - ShWB, and while a ו can drop out of roots like this one in many conjugations, as it does in שבתי, neither a ש nor a ב typically do. So, a conjugation that would end up getting pronounced "be-ti", ...


1

R' Michael Broyde-- in a 2004 article titled "The Ketubah in America: Its Value in Dollars, its Significance in Halacha and its Enforceability in American Law"-- seems to say no: (bolding for emphasis) The enforceability in American law of the ketubah payment is a matter that has rarely been litigated, although there is not a single case where a court ...


1

This is a great question which surprisingly doesn't return a clear answer via a Google search, so submitted this question to the wonderful Talmidei Chachamim of the Kollel Iyun HaDaf. To which they replied: Ie while by the strict letter of the law you technically "may" be able to write a ketubah in a non-Aramaic language... this is definitely not something ...


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