12

This exact question was asked by R. Hezekiah Silva in his commentary to the Shulchan Aruch where it says that the students stopped dying. Peri Chadash O.C. 493:2 ומיהו יש לדקדק בשמחה זו למה ואי משום שפסקו מלמות מה בכך הרי לא נשארו אחד מהם וכולם מתו ומה טיבה של שמחה זו However, there is [a need] to clarify why we have this joy. If it's because they stopped ...


9

Merely dancing next to a bonfire has nothing to do the ways of the Emorites, nor is it a form of fire worship, if the dancer(s) has/have no such intent. The question is based on a misunderstanding of the words of the Tosephta. המספק והמטפח והמרקד לשלהבת הרי זה מדרכי האמורי. "Dancing TO THE FLAME is following in the ways of the Emorites." The ...


9

The Beit Yosef there quotes many Rishonim who have a version of the story (Yevamot 62b) that Rabbi Akiva's students died until פרוס העצרת a half [month] before Shavuot. So 49-15=34 and on the last day we say that a partial day counts as the whole day so on the 34th in the morning, the mourning ends.


7

The sources are brought in the footnotes here. On the specific question of where it comes from, several Rishonim write that this is a tradition from the Geonim (for example the Meiri on that Gemera). Some have a version of the Gemara that is "פרוס עצרת" - half way, in other words half a month, or 15 days, before Shavuos, which would be the 34th day of the ...


6

I located two customs mentioned in this article: Bows and Arrows: On Lag Baomer kids go out into the fields to play with bows and arrows. There are two schools of thoughts as to what this custom commemorates. One opinion cited in the Midrash is that during the time of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai no rainbow was seen.* It was after the great flood that ...


6

Rabbi Yechezkel Abramsky, in his commentary 'Tosefta Chazon Yechezkel' on the Tosefta, explains that the manner in which one qualifies for 'the ways of the Emorites' would be by dancing in order to expedite the cooking process. שעושים דברים אלה למהר הבישול אי נמי לאיזה סימן אחר שהיה להם בזה They perform these dances in order to speed up that which is being ...


5

From a Halachic perspective, this is not a concern, see this short article (Hebrew). For example, Rashba 1:167 says that only those practices also mentioned in the Gemara are subject to the prohibition of Darkei Haemori, and some have understood that this is the position of R' Yosef Karo in Shulchan Aruch, where he did not list the practices in the Tosefta, ...


4

Many Sephardic rabbis and works (e.g. Yalkut Yosef) do indeed call it "Lag La'omer."


4

Rama OC 493:3 בהרבה מקומות נוהגים להסתפר עד ראש חדש אייר, ואותן לא יספרו מל"ג בעומר ואילך, אעפ"י שמותר להסתפר בל"ג בעומר בעצמו. ואותן מקומות שנוהגין להסתפר מל"ג בעומר ואילך, לא יסתפרו כלל אחר פסח עד ל"ג בעומר In many places they are accustomed to take a haircut until Rosh Chodesh Iyar, and they shouldn't take a haircut from Lag ...


3

Rambam, Hilchos Teshuvah, 3:1 "Each and every person has merits and sins. A person whose merits exceed his sins is [termed] righteous. A person whose sins exceed his merits is [termed] wicked. If [his sins and merits] are equal, he is termed a Beinoni. The same applies to an entire country. If the merits of all its inhabitants exceed their sins, it is [...


2

As brought here, the two opinions are the Mechaber and the Ramo. The Mechaber holds that the proper time to morn the students of Rabbi Akiva is when it happened, whereas the Ramo holds that it should be on the days that Tachnurn is not said. The Arizal holds that the issue on Sefira is that they are days of judgement, which is why the students died then, so ...


2

According to the footnote to this artice, the calculation of dates where death did not happen includes Isru Chag (the day after Pesach). This brings the total of "non-death days" back to 17, and solves our "off by one" problem. The Nachlat Tzvi on Orach Chaim 493 gives this as an answer to our question on the Maharil. Note that he explicitly dismisses the ...


2

Assuming you're referring to those people who keep the 2nd half of the Omer. Those people have to continue the mourning after Lag B'Omer. I would assume that the day ends at sunset - just like every other Halachic day.


1

Cutting hair after lag bomer Rabbi David Sperling from Yeshiva University states that Ashkenazim can cut their hair during the day of lag baomer but not the previous night. Others, however, start their semi-mourning from Rosh Chodesh Iyar and continue it until 3 days before the festival of Shavu'ot. (There is a variation on this custom that counts ...


1

The Gemarah which you quoted above (Yevamos 62b) says after Rabbi Akiva's 24,000 disciples died, the world was desolate until Rabbi Akiva came & taught five new students. Rashi there says the reason for this was because of the Torah which was forgotten by their passing. The Torah is the lifeblood of the Jewish people. It is also the reason the world is ...


1

Perhaps it is connected to the counting of seven weeks from the Korban Omer to the Shtei Halechem reflecting a gradual transcendence of physical man from a primitive, self-centered and bestial state to a state worthy of receiving the Torah. This is perhaps seen in the atypical offerings brought - barley, which is animal food, for the korban omer at the ...


1

I once heard a connection as follows. Shabbos 88b says that the Jews reaccepted the Torah on Purim. אמר רבא אף על פי כן הדור קיבלוה בימי אחשורוש דכתיב קימו וקבלו היהודים קיימו מה שקיבלו כבר On Lag B'Omer Rabbi Shimon allowed Rabbi Abba to write the Toras Hasod. See link here. Thus both of these days have a strong connection to Torah.


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