Hot answers tagged

20

The Midrash Tanchuma (Vayikra 1:8) asks your question: ולמה קריבין קרבן מן העוף ומן הכבשים ומן הצאן ומן העזים ולא מן הדגים, שנאמר, [ו] אם מן העוף עולה קרבנו, אלא בשביל שהם בשר ודם כמו האדם ויוצאין מבטן אמן כמו האדם, מכפרים על האדם. אבל הדגים, ביצים הם ויוצאין מהן וחיין. And why do we offer up sacrifices from birds, sheep and goats but not from fish? ...


18

This discrepancy was noticed by the Radvaz (Shu"t Chelek 3 Simman 585), Mishneh LeMelech (Parshas Derachim, Derech Mitzvoseicha Chelek 4 Simman 467), and the Minchas Chinuch (Mitzvah 467), among others. As mentioned, the Chinuch leaves out the mitzvah against a zar eating terumah, and he replaces it with the prohibition against bringing the korbon pesach on ...


15

See Tosfos "me'alyah", Pesachim 3b, where it says most were sheep. Background: A non-Jew came and told R' Yehuda ben Beseirah that he routinely goes to Jerusalem to eat from the Korban Pesach (which is forbidden to non-Jews). R' Yehuda wasn't going to Jerusalem himself, and so couldn't notify the Jews there. So he came up with a plan for the non-Jew to get ...


13

Rav Hirsch writes in his commentary to the Bible, on Gen. 4:4, the first time that animal sacrifice is mentioned: First, idolatry did not yet exist. It follows, then, that the offering are not a mere concession to polytheism. The offerings antedate polytheism. They are as old as mankind itself, and they are a natural expression of human thoughts and ...


10

Bamidbar 15:14 says that a convert must bring an offering "throughout your generations". Sifre Zuta says that the inclusion of this phrase teaches that converts are accepted at any time. Haamek Davar states that the convert or their descendant must bring an offering when the Temple is rebuilt.


10

The Korban does need to be brought on an altar (Rambam Maaseh Korbanot 19:1). This altar though does not have the requirements of horns, a ramp, a base, and square corners which regular altars (including a Bamah Gedolah, though that isn't the case here (Megilla 9b)) have (Zevachim 108b). I don't see any other listed exclusions, so presumably other ...


10

Mishnah Zevachim 14:4-8 describe the times that bamot were permitted and forbidden: Before the mishkan was set up - bamot permitted Once the mishkan was set up in the desert - bamot forbidden While the mishkan was in Gilgal - bamot permitted While the mishkan was in Shiloh - bamot forbidden While the mishkan was in Nov and Giv'on - bamot permitted Once the ...


9

Enlightened by the approaches taken in other answers and encouraged by the large number of views, I suggest this analysis as an answer to my own question. There is agreement on the web that dressed weight is about 50% (e,g, sites below). There is less agreement on the weight of a lamb of a year of age or under. This site gives the weight of lambs at 12 ...


9

The gemara on Yoma 26a explains that there was just one lottery that covered both services: א"ר יוחנן אין מפייסין על תמיד של בין הערבים אלא כהן שזכה בו בשחרית זוכה בו ערבית Rabbi Yoḥanan said: They did not hold a separate lottery for the slaughtering and sacrifice of the daily afternoon offering. Rather, the same priest who won a particular ...


8

The Mishna (Zevachim 3:1) states: כל הפסולין ששחטו שחיטתן כשרה שהשחיטה כשרה בזרים בנשים ובעבדים ובטמאים אפילו בקדשי קדשים Anyone who is invalid for Temple service who slaughtered [a sacrifice], the slaughter is valid, for slaughtering [sacrifices] is valid even for non-priests, women, slaves and even impure people, even for the holiest of sacrifices. ...


8

The extra blood after each sacrifice was poured at the base of the altar (if it was considered Shirayim, leftover) or the Amah - a channel which led out of the courtyard (if the blood's status is dichuy, invalid to be poured on the base). This is from the Talmud, Zevachim 34b. The leftover blood which was poured out flowed to Nachal Kidron, and was redeemed ...


8

The עיקר תוי"ט already asks your question ibid ח: וְדִבְרֵי תֵּימַהּ הֵן, דִּבְהֶדְיָא שָׁנִינוּ בְּמִשְׁנָה ג' פֶּרֶק ב' דִּזְבָחִים חוּץ לִמְקוֹמוֹ פָּסוּל וְאֵין בּוֹ כָּרֵת‏ So it seems that the Bartenura was either badly copied or else simply used the common phrase חוץ לזמנן או חוץ למקומן "as a matter of habit". (For similar, see the עיקר ...


8

It's from the Talmud (Pesachim 53b) with the reason given as "for it looks like he is consecrating his animal and consuming an offering outside [of the Temple]". The Shulchan Arukh codifies it as well (OC 469). (The Arukh haShulchan (ibid. :4) notes that the Rambam did not codify this rule, and thinks that he omitted it because he thought it only was true ...


8

This is a Korban, so the Chelev was burned on the Mizbeach. Regarding the Gid haNasheh, there is a famous disagreement between the Rambam and the Raavad (Korban Pesach 10:11): כשאדם אוכל את הפסח חותך הבשר ואוכל וחותך העצמות מן הפרק ומפרקן אם רצה. וכשיגיע לגיד הנשה מוציאו ומניחו עם שאר הגידים והעצמות והקרומות שיוצאין בשעת אכילה. שאין מנקין אותו כשאר הבשר ...


7

While this isn't exactly what you're looking for, it's close: the Rama's Toras Ha'Olah, which does go through just about every mitzvah/halakha in Seder Kodshim and explains the reasoning for their details in a super-cool-scientific-mystical way. It's not an encyclopedia in that it isn't in alphabetical order, but it is ordered systematically, by topic. ...


7

A lot of ink has been spilled on this topic. Kaftor Vaferach (ch. 6) reports that Rabbeinu Yechiel of Paris (who immigrated to the Land of Israel, with his students, sometime in the 1250s) proposed in 5017 (1257) to go to Jerusalem and offer korbanos, and mentions the concerns about tum'ah (which he goes on to dismiss, since public korbanos override it) and ...


7

The minimum of an average person had to go to the Bais Hamikdash for the 3 Regolim and that meant a Korban Olas Re'iya and a Chagiga. In addition, on Erev Pesach they had to bring a Korban Pesach (which was brought in groups as opposed to the individual). As far as how often a person would have to go to the Mikdash, even if a person is obligated to bring a ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch Harav says that one eats eggs to remind him to mourn the Beis Hamikdash, since had the Beis Hamikdash stood, we would have been eating the korban Pesach.


7

As Clint already mentioned, the obligation to bring doves applies to a Zava - one who bleeds between the expected times of her period (to oversimplify). So most women never had this obligation. Another missing piece is that the woman does not have to bring the doves immediately - she can accumulate the obligations and bring them all together. As long as ...


7

The prophet Jeremiah (19:5) clearly identifies the baal as one of the gods to which the Caananites offered their children: וּבָנוּ אֶת בָּמוֹת הַבַּעַל לִשְׂרֹף אֶת בְּנֵיהֶם בָּאֵשׁ עֹלוֹת לַבָּעַל אֲשֶׁר לֹא צִוִּיתִי וְלֹא דִבַּרְתִּי וְלֹא עָלְתָה עַל לִבִּי


7

This is a classic ruba d'leisa kaman. In the overall population, a very, very small number of animals are prohibited. Knowing nothing else, presented with an animal before us, we assume it is permitted. (This is known as "leisa kaman", "it does not appear before us", as the negative outcome is a theoretical. A weaker form of rov is "ruba d'isa kaman", "a ...


7

From a skeptical standpoint it would probably be easiest to presume that the ancient Israelites merely adopted and or adapted the methods of worship common at the time their religion emerged but I see no reason that those of us that do not share such presuppositions would find such an assumption that compelling. Our tradition teaches that although animal ...


7

This is the method of shechitah (ritual slaughtering used today. We are commanded that the method of slaughtering used for animals (for regular eating) must be the same method as used for the altar. This is explained in Talmud Bavli Masechet Chulin 38a. See the Rashi below. To explain in more detail, the talmud says that we use the method of shechita which ...


7

The Mishnah in Taanit 4:6 reports that the Jews had five calamities on the 17th of Tammuz, the second was that the tamid offering was not brought anymore, and the Temple was eventually destroyed on the 9th of Av. On Taanit 28b the Sages discuss, whether this refers to the First (587 BCE) or the Second Temple (70 CE), and they conclude that it was the Second ...


7

Rambam Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Ma'aseh HaKorbanot 1:1: כָּל הַקָּרְבָּנוֹת שֶׁל מִינֵי נֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה בָּאִין מֵחֲמִשָּׁה מִינִין בִּלְבַד. מִן הַבָּקָר וּמִן הַכְּבָשִׂים וּמִן הָעִזִּים וּמִן הַתּוֹרִים וּמִן בְּנֵי הַיּוֹנָה:‏ All sacrifices of living creatures come from the following five species only: Cattle, sheep, goats, turtle doves and ...


7

Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Laws of Forbidden Relationships 13:4-5 וכן לדורות, כשירצה הגוי להיכנס לברית, ולהסתופף תחת כנפי השכינה, ויקבל עליו עול תורה--צריך מילה, וטבילה, והרצאת קרבן; ואם נקבה היא, טבילה וקרבן: שנאמר "ככם כגר" (במדבר טו,טו)--מה אתם במילה וטבילה והרצאת קרבן, אף הגר לדורות במילה וטבילה והרצאת קרבן.‏ ומה הוא קרבן הגר--עולת בהמה, ...


7

This question is discussed in Chevel Nachalato 8:13, where a number of contemporary Rabbis' approaches are presented. R. Avigdor Nebenzahl writes that he knows of no good answer to the question, but does note some hints to the shtei halechem, such as Chabad's text of ושני שעירים לכפר as part of musaf. R. Ya'akov Epstein suggests that there is a hesitance ...


6

The Taz (OC 473:4) suggests the reason is so that we can eat it, because it is forbidden to eat roasted meat on the Seder night. The Mishna Berura (:23) quotes two other reasons. First, that we use an egg, which is commonly served at a meal to mourners, to represent our mourning the loss of the Beit HaMikdash and the Korbanot. Second, the word for egg in ...


6

This question is related to another and I believe the answers are the same. The sugya (discussion) is found in Talmud Bavli, Krisus 8b-9a. The resolution there is essentially that the korban (offering) is not m'akev (does not invalidate the conversion), which is learned from a gzeiras hakasuv (exegetical interpretation of a verse).


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible