32

The Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 4:13 says that a ben or bat niddah is 'pagum' (defective). The Beit Shemuel, Chelkat Mechokek and Gra (the major commentaries there) all say that this does not exclude them from marrying a kohein.


18

The Talmud (Arachin 3b) informs us that the Kohanim were exempt from wearing the Tefillah shel Yad while servicing in the Temple because it would constitute a separation between the priestly garments and the skin. The Tefillah shel Rosh could still be worn, and the priestly garments on the head were worn in such a way as to leave room in the front for the ...


16

See this mp3 by Rabbi Aharon Kahn, summarized by Joel Rich here: Once a Kohain is ritually impure due to contact with dead, is there any prohibition of further impurity? This makes a difference for med students and pulpit rabbis. The simple understanding is that for non-Kohens, yes we're all tamei so it makes no difference. You want to live in your own ...


15

See this comprehensive survey at Aish, about plastic surgery in general. It mentions this kohen reason, in the name of Rabbi Menashe Klein, in his Mishneh Halachos, and (IIUC) Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach. But others permit for very different reasons: Thus: In 1961, Rabbi Immanuel Jakobovits, considered by many to be the father of the discipline of Jewish ...


15

From this Chabad article the restrictions on whom a Kohen can marry are: A kohen may not marry a ge’rusha (divorcee), chalalah (woman of defective kohen status), zonah (woman who previously violated certain sexual prohibitions), giyoret (convert) or chalutzah (a Levirate widow). If he does marry any of them, their children likewise become chalalim....


15

As I understand it, if a Kohen is certain that his wife was violated by another man, their union is now prohibited and a divorce would be needed. A kohen is prohibited from being married to an isha zonah, which the Talmud defines as a woman who has had relations with any man -- regardless of her choice in the matter! -- other than her husband, with the ...


14

Mishna in Makoth 2:7 וְכֹהֵן גָּדוֹל שֶׁהָרַג , אֵינוֹ יוֹצֵא מִשָּׁם לְעוֹלָם A Cohen Gadol who kills goes to the Ir Miklat forever. They would have to appoint another one, to do the Avoda on Yom Kippour, as the first one loses his job as Kohen Gadol, as the Rambam הלכות רוצח ושמירת נפש at (7:14) says about all those sentenced to Ir Miklat, after they ...


14

Quoted from the book Healing in Halacha By Rabbi Micha Cohn (page. 245-247 Mosaica Press 2016) Rav Moshe Feinstein (Iggros Moshe Yoreh Deah 1:230), wrote on the opinions of a contemporary Rabbi Yitzchok Isaac Leibes, who wrote a Kuntres called Rofe Kol Bassar where he asks this very question. One of the issues that Rabbi Leibes and Rabbi ...


13

Hebrew Wikipedia has an extensive discussion on the matter. Also see Chapter 2 of יופי של עברית by אבשלום קור , כהנא, כגן, קוגן, קגן, כגנוביץ, קאהן, קון ,קיהן, כהנמן, כוהנר, ברכגן, ברקן , קצמן, כצובר Kahana, Kagan, Kogen, Kagen, Kagnovitch, Kahan, Kohn, Kihan, Kahanamen, Kohner, Brechgan, Barkan, Katzman, Katzover (the last two being later extensions of ...


13

Based on the Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 7:21 the daughter of converts (and her daughter etc. until at least one of the parents has traditional Jewish ancestry) should not marry a priest. However, if she does and she was conceived after her parents' conversions, then they do not need to get divorced, implying a non-Biblical restriction on such a marriage, and ...


13

The Shulchan Aruch rules (YD 373:2) that the prohibition of contracting impurity from a corpse does not apply to female descendants of Kohanim. His source is the Mishna in Kiddushin 1:7 which lists 3 biblical prohibitions which do not apply to females: this one, destroying the 5 corners of one's beard, and rounding off the corners of one's hair ("peyos").


13

The Rambam (Issurei Biah 18:1) defines a Zonah thus: מפי השמועה למדנו שהזונה האמורה בתורה היא כל שאינה בת ישראל, או בת ישראל שנבעלה לאדם שהיא אסורה להנשא לו איסור השוה לכל, או שנבעלה לחלל אע"פ שהיא מותרת להנשא לו‏ From a tradition we have learned that the Zonah described in the Torah is any woman who is not a Jew [lit. "daughter of a Jew"], or a Jew ...


12

Tosafos (Zevachim 102a, ד"ה אני מסגירה) asks this and leaves it unresolved. Netziv (to Sifri on this verse) suggests two possibilities: True that she'd be tahor, but she'd be in a state of suspense (not knowing what the outcome would be) until there is a kohen available - a yet-to-be-born son (or grandson) of Elazar or Isamar - who could check it and make ...


11

Per the Shach in Yorah Deah Siman 369:2 and the Taz in 369:4 since in current times there is no Tahara in Eretz Yisroel therefore there is no additional prohibition for a Kohain to leave Eretz Yisroel over a non Kohain.


11

Anything which can contract impurity cannot block impurity from passing through it (Megillah 26b, Shulchan Aruch YD 371:1). A vessel can only contract impurity if it is made from cloth, sackcloth, leather, bone, wood, metal, or earthenware (Rambam Keilim 1:1, see Leviticus 11:32-33 and Numbers 31:22). Plastic therefore cannot contract impurity, so it can ...


11

It is important to note that the husband must "believe" his wife in order for them to need a divorce. There is a very pertinent teshuva from R' Moshe Feinstein (אגרות משה אה"ע א' סימן כ"ד) in which he writes that the criteria for "belief" is different from what one may imagine. In essence, according to him, even if a husband says he believes his wife, we ...


11

The answer is that a Cohen who has relations with a non-Jewish woman is not removed from his sanctity and therefore not permitted to marry a woman who's had relations with non-Jews. רמבם הלכות איסורי ביאה פרק יט:א איזו היא חללה: זו שנולדה מאיסורי כהונה; וכן אחת מן הנשים האסורות לכהונה שנבעלה לכוהן, נתחללה. אבל הכוהן עצמו שעבר העבירה, לא נתחלל. ...


11

Rambam, Hilchot Klei HaMikdash 8:5: כָּל בֶּגֶד מִבִּגְדֵי כְּהֻנָּה שֶׁנַּעֲשׂוּ צוֹאִין אֵין מְלַבְּנִין אוֹתָן וְאֵין מְכַבְּסִין אוֹתָן אֶלָּא מַנִּיחָן לִפְתִילוֹת וְלוֹבֵשׁ חֲדָשִׁים. וּבִגְדֵי כֹּהֵן גָּדוֹל שֶׁבָּלוּ גּוֹנְזִין אוֹתָן. וּבִגְדֵי לָבָן שֶׁעוֹבֵד בָּהֶם בְּיוֹם הַצּוֹם אֵינוֹ עוֹבֵד בָּהֶם פַּעַם שְׁנִיָּה לְעוֹלָם אֶלָּא ...


10

In an article titled "The Study of Medicine by Kohanim," Dr. Edward R. Burns concludes: The overwhelming majority of authoritative rabbinic scholars prohibit the study of medicine by a kohen in any school where the dissection of human corpses is required. If a student is given permission to learn anatomy by observation of dissection without ...


10

Chayim K'halacha question 223 - Rabbi Boruch Shlomo Blizinsky - says a Kohain may go on the paths that lead to Auschwitz however may not enter the area where the incinerators are.


10

Kohanim need to be Jews first. The child of a non-Jewish woman is not a Jew, and thus cannot be a kohen. Even if a kohen marries a convert (which halacha forbids, but if he did), so his child is Jewish, that child is not a kohen. Marrying someone who isn't even Jewish could not produce a better result in terms of the child's status. If the child converts ...


9

They are indeed disqualifications for serving in the Beis Hamikdash (Rambam, Hil. Bias Mikdash 8:1,11). This doesn't apply to birkas kohanim, though; there, a kohen is disqualified only by blemishes that are visible and will distract the congregation. (And even then, not if everyone in town is already familiar with him and his physical defects, or in places ...


9

It's based on the Zohar Nasso 146b and is noted as an old minhag in both Ashkenaz and Sefarad by the Beit Yosef (OC 128). In the Shulchan Aruch he codifies this practice in OC 128:6. It seems the reasoning in the Zohar is that the Kohanim need to somehow up their kedusha level by washing as a preparation for the blessing, and by having a Levi, who has his ...


9

A man who has undergone a vasectomy is most likely in the category of Petzua Daka (crushed testicles) who is forbidden to marry a regular Jewess per Devarim 23:2 (although this might depend on the specific medical technique used). (See Shulchan Aruch EH 5:8,10.) The Talmud (Yevamot 76a) discusses whether a Kohein who is a Petzua Dakah can marry a convert. (...


9

Possibly this is a (mistaken) extension of the idea that once summoned for birkath kohanim in the synagogue service, a Kohen who declines to perform the blessing is in violation of the positive commandment to bless the people: Shulchan Aruch 128:2 Any Kohain to whom one of the inhibiting factors does not apply who does not go up to the duchan, even ...


9

To answer the last part of the question that wasn't addressed yet. Is there any significance as to why a specific stone was assigned to a specific tribe? Was it something within the color, or the texture or strength of the stone that made it appropriate? "Hoshen," by ברי"א. Used with permission per CC BY-SA 2.5 This is Rabbeinu Bechaye's explanation. I ...


9

Responsa Shevet Halevi 8:172 rules that such a person is allowed to duchen, because the verse that is the source of the prohibition, as well as the Rambam and Shulchan Aruch imply that the issue is that hands used to murder cannot also be used to duchen. In this case however the 'murder' was not done with his hands, so the prohibition would not apply.


8

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/468267/jewish/Kohen-Marriages.htm Thus a child of parents who were both converts before they married is technically permitted to marry a kohen because horatah ve’ledatah bi-kedushah (she was conceived and born in sanctity as a Jew). But the kohanim took upon themselves an extra stringency and did not ...


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