The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
13

You can own them (Rama in Shulchan Aruch OC 453:1). The Mishna Berura there adds that you can even derive benefit from them.


12

This question ought to be, "Why can Ashkenazi Jews not eat rice on Passover?" There are 5 grains that make Ḥametz when mixed with water and allowed to rise: barley, rye, oats, wheat, and spelt. Any others that have been added by communal custom are just that - additions by virtue of communal custom.


11

People have attempted all sorts of mental gymnastics to develop a Theory of Everything vis-a-vis kitniyot. I spare my poor brain and follow Rav Moshe Feinstein's opinion (Igros, OC3:63): it's kitniyot if it happened to have been banned (or "warned against"); not if it didn't. Rav Moshe also suspects that at some point they stopped adding foods to the list ...


11

There is no special Talmudic dispensation regarding oats. The Mishna lists a grain called שבולת שועל as able to become Chametz. Most Rishonim don't identify that grain with what we call oats. Some Rishonim do identify that grain with what we call oats. Your point is one very strong proof for the former position, according to which indeed oats can't become ...


9

The Jews of Bagdad and Morocco stayed away from rice because they were afraid that it was mixed with wheat. See Ben Ish Chai Tzav 41 , Rav Pe’alim 3:30


9

This list from the Star-K has many items that you can feed your cat on Pesach. Per the CRC-Chicago Kitniyot ingredients, such as corn and rice, are acceptable in pet foods for Passover, because while Ashkenazim do not customarily eat kitniyot, they are permitted to own and benefit from them.


8

Kitniyot are not specified in the Torah at all. They are chumrot — binding customs of the community. The Sefardic kitniyot custom permits rice provided it has been carefully checked grain-by-grain before Passover begins to ensure that no chametz grains are in it. (How carefully depends on the tradition; I have seen "3 times" and "7 times" specified by ...


8

(To fulfill the Mitzva of eating Matza at the Seder the Matza must be made with proper grains (Mishna Pesachim 2:5) not Kitniyot. The foods being discusses here are being called "Matza" more as a pseudonym because of the similarity of the baking process involved.) Chayei Adam 127:1 says explicitly that rice Matza is allowed. Shulchan Arukh HaRav 453:5 says ...


6

Logically, you've got to consider the reasons things are considered kitniyos: the item is used to make some kind of flour, the item is grown among chometz species, the item was historically confused with chometz in storage or preparation -- and sometimes, there's just a longstanding minhag that the item is kitniyos. Sesame is considered kitniyos by every ...


6

It is not the case that a ruling in the Talmud will always overcome any possible custom developed later. In Talmudic times, there was no customary prohibition of kitniyot. Rav Huna, in the quote, is giving an example of what may be used as the two cooked dishes, even though of course other simple dishes would be fine as well. And he specifies orez (which ...


5

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes that if a custom developed about it at whatever point in time, for whatever reason, it's kitniyos; if not, then not. Regarding peanuts -- he doesn't say that they're not kitniyos because they're too new. He says there were different customs in different places, and where he came from had no custom against them. But if you know ...


5

The earliest source, Sefer Mitzvot ha-katan (SMaK) of R. Yitzchak of Corbeil lists, in French, pois (peas), fole (perhaps, fave, fava beans, 'ful' in Hebrew) & ris (rice), which he lists as 'types of kitniyot'. Prior to that, the designation 'kitniyot' applied primarily in the context of the laws of kilayim. Rambam conceptualizes three categories of ...


5

Dose of Halacha goes through the various opinions of toiletries that contain alcohol over Pesach. He explains why it isn't a problem. R’ Ovadia Yosef (Yalkut Yosef 447:2) permits using products that contain denatured alcohol on Pesach. R’ Chaim Elazar Shapira (Minchas Elazar 5:37) writes that while people are particular, once alcohol has been denatured, ...


5

Not eating Kitniot (legumes,lentils and rice) is a minhag (Iggeros Moshe O.C. III:63 confirms this approach as a reason why we don't add extra kitnios like potatoes, sunflower seeds etc.) and only forbiddon to eat on pesach for ashkenazim but is permitted to own.The source of the Minhag: Smak (Rav Yitzchak Mikorbeil 13th century) 222: על הקטניות וכיוצא ...


5

There appears to have been no particular custom against them. When the Star-K came out strongly arguing that quinoa was not kitniyos, I'd heard that there was talk of then certifying other semi-grains about which there was no custom, such as Job's tears (or teff, for that matter). Instead there was strong opposition to quinoa, so the Star-K stopped there. ...


4

If I recall correctly there were some concerns (at least a few years ago) with corn-derived preservatives or packaging materials with regards to some packaged nuts. It may not be "chopping the walnuts makes them kitniyot", but "your average bag of chopped walnuts bought at the store may have been treated with some kitniyot product." But there are a zillion ...


4

CANOLA OIL from the Orthodox Union. Canola oil, which is a form of rapeseed oil, should be considered kitniyot. The Star-K (Baltimore Va'ad Hakashrus also lists Canola Oil in its list of Kitniyos CRC goes into the details as to why rapeseed oil (Canola oil) is considered kitniyos (based on Maharsham I:183 that it was used in Europe). Note that the CRC ...


4

There were briefly those who'd heard of this thing called coffee -- it's a "bean", you grind it -- who wondered if it were kitniyot. This was quickly rejected, I don't recall who it was who'd said "if you ever saw a coffee plant, you'd understand why it's not kitniyos." Very simply -- all kitniyos, like the 5 grains, are annuals. Coffee and chocolate are ...


4

There is no definitive answer. See some links permitting and some links forbidding and some links equivocating. It's hard to say either side should be viewed as violating halacha. Speak to your rabbi for a ruling and be sure that the product is certified for Pesach regarding the other ingredients.


4

"Google is your friend" The History, Rationale and Practice of Avoiding Kitniyos on Passover has an explicit statement The Alter Rebbe, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, specifically forbids oils derived from kitniyos. Thus this would imply that if even the derived oils are forbidden (which some may allow), then kal vachomer, the kitniyos themselves ...


3

Just because the English word is 'bean' does not mean that it is kitniyos. A good explanation can be found at What is Kitniyot? Here is the initial summary of that article. You can read the details there. Authored by the Orthodox Union. Copyright © 2008 Orthodox Union In addition to the Torah’s restrictions on owning, eating and benefiting from ...


3

There is no definitive answer. Some links permitting and some forbidding and some equivocating. It's hard to say either side should be viewed as violating halacha.


3

I assume the question means the following case. A person had cooked rice and (let’s say) cooked oatmeal in front of him. He made the brocho BM”M on the rice and the question is whether this will cover the oatmeal. There are two stages to the answer. 1) Rice is not so choshuv (important) as oats. As proof see the Mishna Berura 208 (7)[30] where we see that ...


3

Generally, things that do not have the tradition of being kitnyot, are not kitnyot. A good example of this is quinoa. It is similar in many ways to other types of banned kitnyot, yet the generally accepted halakhic authorities do not classify it as kitnyot, partly because it was not included in the original custom. Based on the tradition of kitynot, there ...


3

Chametz is a biblical term which refers to grains which ferment when water is added. This fermentation causes the dough mixture to puff up. The talmud (Pesachimn 35a) discusses the fact that rice and millet also puff up when water is added. The structure of the discussion: The Mishna lists the grains that one may use for the mitva of eating matza on ...


3

To support for Shalom's answer that the issue isn't about chopped nuts being kitniyot per se, but rather kitniyot being used during the processing, we see from the OU- "Raw nuts in their shell do not require Passover certification. Shelled nuts that list BHA or BHT (preservatives) in the ingredients require special Passover certification. They are sprayed ...


3

Tofu is made from soybeans which are kitniot, so yes, tofu cheese would be included in the prohibition of kitniot.


3

According to Rabbi Yehuda Shurpin (chabad.org): The Shulchan Aruch HaRav (Orech Chaim 453:3-4) applies the prohibition of kitniyot to any legume-like foods which look similar to dishes made from grain when cooked. Also, certain foods, such as mustard seeds, are prohibited because they grow in pods similar to legumes; and cumin is prohibited because its seeds ...


3

The OU doesn't list Job's tears or coix seed on their list of kitnyiot products, but they list millet (and Wiki says Job's tears are also called adlay - or adlay millet - but it appears to be a different species). There is controversy whether beans and grains that became popular recently (e.g., sunflower seeds, string beans, peanuts and quinoa) are included ...


2

Hm. As I understand it, the reason Ashkenazim don't eat matza-made-with-fruit-juice is to respect a minority opinion in Tosfos, that it would create a certain form of chametz. But if someone is ill, we rely on the majority opinion. Kitniyos is purely a custom, and one that was never decreed against those who are ill. Hence my guess is all else being equal, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible