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15

From Dinonline.org: The Question: If someone is lo aleinu sick and adds a name to his existing name does he have to have written a new Kasubah? Answer: The Iggros Moshe (Choshen Mishpat 2:70:2) writes that if a person is not called by his new name, one does not write a new kesubah after a name was added due to illness. This is also the ...


12

The form 'כְּתוּבָה' certainly exists, as you state; it is the passive participle of the root כתב, and means "written", as in: "נבואתו כתובה על הקיר" = "his prophecy is written on the wall". However, this is not the same as the noun which designates a "marriage contract". Although there are exceptions, for the most part nouns with specific meanings are not ...


10

She is definitely still married, so adultery remains absolutely forbidden. However, they must get a special new replacement kesuba written up before they may return to regular intimacy. (Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 66:3)


9

I'm not sure if I understood this correctly, feel free to point put any mistakes. The Yad Eliyahu, after much back and forth, seems to say that: The reason for a monetary obligation is, as the Rambam (Hilchot Ishut 10:7) says, in order to make sure that it should not be of little import for a man to kick his wife out of the house. The Rabbis agreed that ...


8

In general, only one status is needed to be listed. For a Jewish born virgin, besulah is written because she is due 200 zuz upon divorce/death of husband. For a Jewish born "widow" (I'm not sure why you wrote "woman"), almanah is written because she is due 100 zuz upon termination of the marriage. For a Jewish born divorcee, gerushah is written because even ...


8

The short answer is no the only way a married woman can marry someone else, is by first receiving a get from the first husband, or after the death of her husband. (Rambam Hilchot Ishus 1:3) And as soon as she receives the get she is free to do as she pleases, so if the first husband made a deal with someone else, she is not bound to follow it. And if the ...


7

The RCA Madrich (rabbi's handbook) by Rabbi Reuven P. Bulka has it vowelized.


7

For starters: in Ashkenazic custom (which I think the questioner was assuming), the kesubah has already been signed (i.e. executed) before the chupah, so the reading is nothing more than a pause between parts of the ceremony. It's accomplishing nothing of a halachic nature any more than reading the latest stock numbers would be, hence many rabbis have been ...


7

Quick answer: Yes and no. Any religious or doctrinal aspects of a kesubah itself cannot be enforced under American laws because of Constitutional issues involving the free exercise and establishment clauses to the First Amendment. However, courts have and can enforce strictly secular sections of kesubahs or separate secular agreements between a Jewish ...


6

It is prohibited for a man to live with his wife without ketubah. This is so even when there had been one that was lost or destroyed, such a situation requires another ketubah to be prepared prior to continuing to live together as man and wife (Shulchan Aruch, Even HaEzer 66:3). That a couple had been together without a Ketubah does not obviate the need, ...


6

A kesubah is a shtar -- a binding legal document under Jewish law -- and must meet the criteria required of all shtars. If a kesubah is found to have a mistake, it can be corrected with a kesubah dimishtakich bei ta’usa, a kesubah in which a mistake was found, that is used in these circumstances and signed by witnesses. See http://e.yeshiva.org.il/midrash/...


6

https://archive.org/details/ReadingKesubah has an mp3 audio recording of it.


6

The document itself is given to the husband to prove that he actually paid the כתובה. He can dispose of it however he desires. Or alternatively, she gives him a שובר (a receipt) documenting that he actually paid her, and she can do with the כתובה whatever she pleases.


6

'3. Is easy, mi shebeirachs are done with the mother's name. '1. If he goes by a particular name you can often stick with it, but if he didn't have one, or if you're dealing with legal documents ... '2. The Rabbinical Council of America handbook for rabbis says to use "so-and-so the son of [mother's name]." I spoke with one seasoned rabbi who said he's ...


6

The ketubah, like any Jewish legal document, requires the signature of two witnesses. Besides being Jewish men who are unrelated to each other (or to the bride or groom), there are other qualifications. The Shulchan Arukh (חושן משפט הלכות עדות סימן לד) rules that רשע פסול לעדות A rasha is invalidated from serving as a witness What is a rasha? ...


6

The Aruch HaShulchan in Even Ha'Ezer 62:8 says that reading the Ketubah under the Chuppah is a custom instituted by Rashi (1040-1105) ורש"י ז"ל הנהיג לקרות הכתובה אחר הקדושין כי היכי דליהוי הפסק גדול בין ברכת אירוסין לברכת נשואין, וכן המנהג פשוט אצלינו.‏ The point of the reading was to enforce a long break between the 2 ceremonies of Kidishin and ...


6

The kesuba serves as documentary testimony that the groom accepted upon himself the responsibilities entailed therein. It is not an I.O.U., but it is the documentation of his acceptance. Consider the following text within the kesuba (this is taken from the RCA's version): ב ______ בשבת ______ לחדש ______ שנת חמשת אלפים ושבע מאות ______ לבריאת העולם למנין ...


5

The marriage of a cheresh who is both deaf and mute is only Rabbinical in nature and is not Biblical (min haTorah) (Even HaEzer 44:1) . The status of a cheresh who is deaf but not mute is the subject of debate among Poskim whether his status is that of a standard cheresh and is only Rabbinical, or is Biblical (Hanesuin Kehilchasam 16: fn 123) One whose ...


5

This is an excellent question that is best asked to your local Orthodox rabbi. 1 One important aspect of the question, which should not be minimized, is the public humiliation to the bride, who will be mortified that her lack of virginity will be revealed to her friends and family. Chazal say (Berachot 43b) about embarrassing someone in public that it ...


5

No. The Rambam writes (Ishus 10:6[7]): וחכמים הם שתיקנו כתובה לאישה, כדי שלא תהיה קלה בעיניו להוציאה The sages are the ones who established a Kesuba for a wife, in order that he should not regard it as easy to divorce her. He also doesn't list the requirement of Kesuba in Sefer HaMitzvos as the Mitzvah of Kiddushin. As to why he terms it that way,...


5

The witnesses who sign the ketubah are witnessing the ketubah -- that is, the husband's obligations to the wife. Witnesses serve the same function here as with any other legal document (debt, property sale, or even a get). The witnesses at the chupah, on the other hand, testify to the completion of that stage of the marriage. While today we generally ...


5

Kollel Eretz Hemda (a very respected halacha kollel in Jerusalem) answers a similar question in their responsa collection Ask the Rabbi vol. 2 (#69, p. 150). Their answer is that you should ask a rav with relevant experience to prepare a new ketuba. If there is a copy of your ketuba (e.g., in a central registry such as the one maintained in Israel by the ...


5

This teshuvah from R. Yaakov Epstein discusses the question of a hefsek between birkat eirusin and the kiddushin / eirusin itself. While he doesn't specifically talk about reading the ketubah as a hefsek, I think it is relevant to your question. Essentially, it boils down to an argument regarding the status of this berachah. Rambam (and others) hold that ...


4

According to the Raavad(Hilchos Isurei Biah 11:10) there was no kesubah or marriage rather it was a setting aside which would be considered pas bsalo and there was no yichud as well. ואם נשאת לת"ח וכו': כתב הראב"ד ז"ל מה שחילק זה בין ת"ח לשאר בני אדם הוציא אותו ממה שאמרו כי מיקלע רב נחמן לשכנציב הוה אמר מאן הויא ליומא ואקשו עליה מדרבא תבעוה לינשא ונתפייסה ...


4

The Aruch Hashulchan writes that one is allowed to write spare contracts. He says that we don't say that it looks like a lie (the scribe writes that someone borrowed money before it happened) unless there are witnesses signed there. However, he says that some say not to write the last part of the contract (the Toref). This is usually taken care of by not ...


4

Rabbi Mordechai Shutchatowitz in Baltimore, Md may be a good person to contact. He has written a sefer on some halachos related to people who are deaf here: http://hebrewbooks.org/37042 His contact information is here: http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=37042&st=&pgnum=2 http://www.associated.org/IR/community-directory.aspx?id=12760 Some ...


4

I think you mean nasha or nashei as is the k'suba formulation (see Rashi on Bava M'tzi'a' 104b, s.v. מקום שנהגו לעשות): ודין נדוניא דהנעלת ליה מבי נשא The expression מבי נשא essentially means "from the house of her father".1 See Tosafos (Shabbos 23b, s.v. דבי נשא דרב שיזבי), who cites a dispute among rishonim regarding whether this phrasing should only ...


4

Pniniei Halocho of Rabbi Melamed defines valid witnesses. וכן אדם שאינו מזדהה עם הערכים שעליהם מבוססים הקידושין, היינו עם ערכי התורה, אינו יכול להיות עד בחתונה. ולכן אדם שחוטא בגילוי עריות, למשל, מקיים יחסים עם אשת איש, או עם אחותו או בתו וכדומה, פסול לעדות. וכן אדם שחשוד בגניבה פסול מלהיות עד, וכמובן שאין הבדל בין אדם שמתפרץ לבית חבירו בלילה ...


4

In a case where the wording could embarrass the bride or groom (for example, it mentions a previous marriage that the public is unaware of, or states that one is a convert and they wish to conceal this; similarly in the case where the bride or groom's true name might cause fights), the Rabbis permit reading the standard text instead of the real text. ...


3

Nit'ey Gavriel nesuin part 1 page 344. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=46545&pgnum=344 Has it with nekudot with commentaries (one of the commentaries explains why he decided to put these nekudot)


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