15

As a convert, this has been a bone of controversy in my family. My Rav, Rabbi Gedaliah Anemer, zt"l, said it was forbidden to enter the sanctuary of a church. Rabbi Maurice Lamm, in his book Becoming A Jew, also does not allow any leniency. When my father died, I brought up the issue because I was asked to speak at the memorial service. Another ...


6

The gemoro in Pesachim 51A says that father, father-in-law, stepfather and brother-in-law (sister's husband) are forbidden, and that there are those who are machmir on brothers as well. According to Rashi the issue is that it would lead one to impure thoughts, to see the place from where he or his wife were produced, or thoughts about his brother-in-law and ...


6

Nitei Gavriel (Hilchot Yichud, chapter 3, halacha 11, footnote 14) brings several opinions (including R' Moshe) that all half-siblings have the same halachot as full siblings. This is what the Nitei Gavriel says in the halacha as well. He then brings that R' Eliyashev says only half-siblings on the mother's side are considered like full siblings. The reason ...


5

http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/the-laws-of-yichud/05.htm See Beis Shmuel, Even HoEzer 22:1. The permissibility of Yichud of a brother and sister includes half-brothers and half-sisters — Dvar Halachah Hosafos Chadashos 2; Divrei Sofrim Emek Davar 56. However, there is a prohibition of Yichud with a step-brother or step-sister.


5

The Shulchan Aruch Harav says that the reason one is prohibited (and it says that the prohibition is in force nowadays) is because of the "evil spirit" there (and not because of Tznius). Therefore, at first glace, there should be no difference whether the two women are related to him or not.


5

A mamzer is the result of a relationship prohibited to the point of spiritual excision (Mishna, Yevamos 4:13). There is no prohibition of any severity for relations with one's self. Every act of normal relations that is prohibited has a verse and explanation of what relationship between those two people forbids their relations. Homosexual relations, which ...


5

A mitsva See Mishna Maccot chapter 2, 2: אַבָּא שָׁאוּל אוֹמֵר, מַה חֲטָבַת עֵצִים רְשׁוּת, יָצָא הָאָב הַמַּכֶּה אֶת בְּנוֹ {יא}, וְהָרַב הָרוֹדֶה אֶת תַּלְמִידוֹ, וּשְׁלִיחַ בֵּית דִּין {יב}: ‏ Bartenura: מַה חֲטָבַת עֵצִים רְשׁוּת. דְּאִי בָעֵי עָיֵיל לַחְטֹב וְאִי בָעֵי לֹא עָיֵיל: יָצָא הָאָב הָרוֹדֶה אֶת בְּנוֹ. דְּמִצְוָה קָא עֲבִיד:‏ Yqar ...


3

The question was asked of ynet Judaism. הרב רונן לוביץ answered: מבחינת ההלכה מותר לאדם להתחתן עם בת דודו או עם בת דודתו מדרגה ראשונה, וכל שכן מדרגה שנייה. ואכן, לא מעט נישואים כאלה היו בעבר, וישנם גם כיום.   לפי הידע המדעי, במקרה שיש נטייה למחלות גנטיות במשפחה, נישואי בני דודים עלולים להגביר את הסיכון להעביר את המחלה לילדים. לכן נראה לי שכדאי ...


3

Check out for the use of Father: Isaiah 63:16 and 64:7. 1 Chronicles 29:10 Deuteronomy 32: 6 Psalms 68:6 Malachi 1:6 for a start. And now Jeremiah 3:19.


3

See the linked answers. Let's say "not recommended", put mildly. I don't know the nature of this non-Jewish relative connection, that's its own set of issues. But in a nutshell: Judaism traditionally prescribes staying far, far away from anything that looks like non-monotheistic worship or a house thereof. There would be very little issue, as far as I know,...


3

This is true on the de'oraisa level, i.e., on the level of Torah law. But mi-derabbanan, they are not allowed to marry each other so that it does not look like "they came from a place of greater holiness to a place of lesser holiness." In other words, since they were not allowed to marry when they were non-Jews, they can't marry as Jews either. Source: ...


2

Because the parent is not Jewish, there is no chiyuv (requirement) for you to sit shiva for them. That being said, there is a kibud av v'em (honor for father and mother) issue which must be contemplated when dealing with sitting shiva for a non-Jewish parent. Basically, there is a concern that the person would not be showing proper respect to his deceased ...


2

Shulchan Aruch Choshen Mishpat 46:35: חתם בשטר עד שלא נעשה חתנו ונעשה חתנו הוא אינו יכול להעיד על כתב ידו אבל אחרים מעידים שמכירים חתימתו אפי' לא ראוהו עד שנעשה חתנו ויש מי שאומר דהיינו דוקא כשהשטר יוצא מתחת יד אחר אבל אם יוצא מתחת יד העדים לא:‏ If one signed a document before becoming a son-in-law [of the claimant] and subsequently became his ...


2

Shvilim B'Daiya - page 48 says there is no obligation to tear Kriya for a stepparent. However one may do so if they want to. He does not indicate on which side it should be done, however being that it is not an obligation, I would say it should be done on the right side like a regular Aveil.


2

God is often called Jews' "father" in Jewish texts, most famously in liturgy. (We ask that he have mercy on us as a father has on his children.) Occasionally, we're called his sons, too. This is all, of course, metaphorical: God has not physically sired anyone, being nonphysical himself.


2

Shulchan Arukh CM 7:9 כל הפסולים (להעיד) מחמת קורבה או מחמת עבירה -- פסולים לדון ‏(ועיין לקמן סי' ל"ג ול"ד פרטי הפסולים לענין עדות וה"ה לענין דיינות שהדיינים לא יהיו קרובים זה לזה ולא לעדים) (ר"ן פ"ב דכתובות ותשובת רשב"א סי' תש"ץ) (עיין לקמן סי' ל"ג סעיף י"ז):‏ In short, the same rules apply. All who are invalid to testify due to being ...


2

You are mixing up two things that have nothing to do with one another. A man is allowed to touch his close relatives: mother, grandmother, (grand)daughter, and sister (although the last is less recommended, but still allowed). This is always allowed, irrespective of anything else (married or single, nidda or not). (And the same for a woman touching her (...


1

The Shu"t Levushei Mordechai OC Tinyana siman 9 beings a proof from a Rebbi to talmid relationship that it would be mutar ,so certainly a son to a father would also count.He also brings a proof from Mishlei 27:10 which uses the term reiah (like reihu) . (Regarding a husband giving to a wife I can see an issue with that because we usually employ the dictum" ...


1

Option 1: I would learn it straight from the Mishna and Gemmorah in Kiddushin 29: "כָּל מִצְוֹת הַבֵּן עַל הָאָב, אֲנָשִׁים חַיָּבִין וְנָשִׁים פְּטוּרוֹת. וְכָל מִצְוֹת הָאָב עַל הַבֵּן, אֶחָד אֲנָשִׁים וְאֶחָד נָשִׁים חַיָּבִין." All commandments of the son which are upon the father, men are obligated, and women are exempt. And all commandments ...


1

If you can make any inference from inheritance laws (Shulchan Aruch, CM 276) [which is based on next-of-kin], the relationship of parent-son is closer than grandparent-grandson.


1

In the blog Daat Torah, the author (I do not know who it is) quotes Rabbi Horowitz. Rabbi Horowitz's website claims (I think correctly) that he is recognized throughout the Jewish community as an authority on raising children in these troubled times. Rabbi Horowitz quotes Rav Pam due to the enhanced sense of personal freedom and individual rights ...


1

Would this not be considered permissible by fact that a woman is obligated to honor her parents by, for instance, "covering and uncovering" them, when required? (Kiddushin 30a)


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