Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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The two issues, as I see it, are -- dipping in the mikvah, and any transfer of non-kosher taste. As for the mikvah -- if it belongs to a non-Jew and the Jew is just borrowing it, there's no obligation to dunk it. The obligation is only on Jewish-owned vessels. If the lender doesn't mind, I suppose you could borrow it and kasher it, which would take care of ...


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A number of kashrut certification agencies (led by Star-K and the OU) discovered that plastic packaging material suppliers were using animal-based additives (e.g., tallow, animal fat) in the plastic resins (e.g., as lubricants) and that these additives could migrate into the food. Interestingly the Food & Drug Administration requires these chemicals to ...


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The question is if a glue that is strong anough to make them utensils give them a status of Keli cheres despite they are not baked. Maybe that we have a proof that it is not the case from the Mishna 11.4. וְכֵן מִן הַחֲלָמָא וּמִן הַגְּלָלִים.‏ And similarly for a mixture of white earth and dung that plays the function of glue and is itself a ...


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Rav Ovadia M'Bartenura writes (ibid): (Source from Sefaria) משיצרפם בכבשן. וקודם צירוף הן כלי אדמה ואין מיטמאין When they are baked in the oven: And before this baking, they are earthenware [i.e. not clay] vessels and are not suseptable to Tuma Based on this, air dried clay vessels would not be susceptible to Tuma. Hope this helps!


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Dairy bread is not uniformly forbidden, there are two exceptions (from OU here) Dairy bread that has a unique shape is permissible because the shape will serve as a reminder that the bread is not parve One may bake a small portion of bread which will be consumed in one meal, as it is assumed one will remember the meat status without difficulty. As such I ...


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