16

Shulchan Aruch here אם מת אשר חטא לו מביא עשרה בני אדם ומעמידם על קברו ואומר חטאתי לאלהי ישראל ולפלוני זה שחטאתי לו (ונהגו לבקש מחילה בערב יו"כ If the person against whom he sinned has died, then he brings 10 people with him to stand by his grave and he says: "I have sinned before the G-d of Israel and against So-and-So I have transgressed." ...


6

Bartenura in Yoma explains (based on the gemara to this mishnah) that ‘light’ commandments here means all positive mitzvot as well as negative mitzvot which are able to be subsequently ‘fixed’ (lav hanitak le’asei). ‘Severe’ transgressions includes the bulk of negative mitzvot (and within that set the gemara differentiates further depending on certain ...


3

The Yerushalmi to this Mishnah brings two explanations for R’ Shimon’s opinion: חברייא אמרין טעמא דר"ש משם שהגדולה מכפרת אמר ר' יוסי שאין חטאו וידיעתו שוין The Chaveirim say: The reason for R’ Shimon is because his stature atones. R’ Yosi said: because his sin and knowledge aren’t the same. That is to say: According to the Chaveirim, that he ...


1

To add authority (in case it matters to you) I would point to the Rambam, who says, that when a sin is committed (or transgressed) unintentionally, one should do Teshuva and aim not to repeat the sin again. They should also be prompted to ask forgiveness from a friend harmed, if any, and go on with their lives. Additionally, Sin (Chet in Hebrew) means to ...


1

Yes and no. If he genuinely regrets the path that he chose and would never do a similar thing again knowing the halacha, he can be forgiven for the rebelliousness of his previous actions (as he didn't know, they were never rebellious in the first place. However, if he were not to have any regret, that would have been a rebellion). However, as he persists in ...


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