19

Although many good answers exist here already, I want to provide somewhat of a more comprehensive response (as best as I can) by putting all the answers I know of in one place. There are three overall ways to answer the question "why do we associate Shavuos with Matan Torah if that is not how it is presented in Tanakh?" One can respond either (I) by saying ...


10

1) Revelation at Har Sinai was necessary to make it mandatory. As Mizrachi explains, the reason Avraham waited, until commanded, to perform circumcision is because there is greater merit in fulfilling a commanded mitzvah than an uncommanded one. 2) See the Rashba's explanation / understanding of this idea, that they were spiritually sophisticated and ...


5

Midrash Rabbah Shemot 46:1 (hebrewbooks link) ‏...הִתְחִיל מִצְטַעֵר עַל שִׁבּוּר הַלּוּחוֹת, וְאָמַר לוֹ הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא אַל תִּצְטָעֵר בַּלּוּחוֹת‏ הָרִאשׁוֹנוֹת, שֶׁלֹא הָיוּ אֶלָּא עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת לְבָד, וּבַלּוּחוֹת הַשְּׁנִיִּים אֲנִי נוֹתֵן לְךָ שֶׁיְהֵא בָהֶם הֲלָכוֹת מִדְרָשׁ וְאַגָּדוֹת, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב: וְיַגֶּד לְךָ ...


5

The miracles of the Exodus were ones the Jews saw or heard. In a way, as if it were a performance and they were the (participating) audience. The miracles were all real things, to be sure. The Jews walked through the Red Sea, drank the water, and ate the manna. People swallowed up by the earth died and stayed dead. All experience of the miracles came ...


5

Rabbi Yosef Hayyim of Baghdad in his book Ben Yehoyada (Meg. 7b s.v. Rabba) asserts that there was no need to redo kiddushin (their marriages were not terminated) and goes on to answer the (related) question raised by early authorities whether or not R. Zera (see Meg. 7b) needed to remarry his wife after he was brought back to life. (For the "why not?" see ...


4

As Alex shared this was the same generation: the first census was before the Tabernacle was built since the half-shekels used for the count were used for the sockets of the structure, the second was seven months later. Still Artscroll picks up on the fact the numbers are similar and brings 3 opinions Rashi (Shemot 30:16) responds that for the purpose of ...


3

Yisro's daughter Tzipora was in Egypt (as explained by the Ramban quoting Midrash Shemos Rabba here Why Moses didn't care for his sons after leaving Egypt? ) with Moshe Rabeinu when he went as an Emmisary on behalf of Hashem to let the Jewish people go. When he arrived in Egypt and was reminded of how he escaped from Pharoh, he called his son Eliezer ...


3

Your question comes from two points, that: (a) Halachos L'Moshe MiSinai are not hinted to in the Torah (b) that these halachos are therefore outside of and external to the Torah, and the completeness of the Torah would not allow for such a thing. In terms of the first point, while that is clearly the opinion of the Rambam in his Introduction to the ...


2

Sefer Shaare Ora, first Shaar. "Below the name A.D.N.I., (א-ד-נ-י), is the world of perud". The hataot Maor Yosef says. הם העולמות שתחת מלכות דאצילות, והם עולם בריאה יצירה עשיה Olam haperud is the set of worlds Bria, Yetsira, Asia, they are below malchut deatsilut, the lower expression of world of atsilut.


2

'The Rabbis point out that all the precepts of the Decalogue had been practised by the Patriarchs and had become the family tradition of their children' (Rabbi Joseph H. Hertz, The Pentateuch and Haftorahs, p. 403). This granted, the chiddush in Shemot 20+ is that (1) God Himself, accompanied by angels, comes down from Heaven and speaks the Ten Commandments ...


1

One could easily argue that they were fully Jewish not on the 7th of Sivan, but on the 4th. After all, we learn the halachos of conversion from Har Sinai (Yevamos 46b), and, according to R’ Yosi, they washed their clothes, toveled, and sprinkled on the 4th of Sivan, and so they had to have three days (Shabbos 86b-87a). The Gemara ibid. 86a makes this point ...


1

It was the same generation. As the verses in Numbers 1:1-2 say when introducing the count: And the LORD spoke unto Moses in the wilderness of Sinai, in the tent of meeting, on the first day of the second month, in the second year after they were come out of the land of Egypt, saying: 'Take ye the sum of all the congregation of the children of Israel, ...


1

For the first twenty-five centuries of history, there existed a gezerah—a “decree” and “schism”—which split reality into two self-contained realms: the spiritual and the material. Torah, the divine wisdom and will, could have no real effect upon the physical world. It was a wholly spiritual manifesto, pertaining to the soul of man and to the spiritual ...


1

Your question seems to be based on the premise that Moses didn’t tell anyone when he was coming back. That’s a false premise. The Medieval commentator Rashi, on Exodus 32:1 (the beginning of the Golden Calf story), quotes the Talmud, Shabbas 89a. He says that Moses indeed told them when he was coming back: “At the end of 40 days, I will return during the ...


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