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26

Thank you for your sensitivity in asking this question. As pointed out in comments, you are actually Jewish (whether you follow Judaism or not). But as you say in your question, you've been raised with Christianity and it doesn't appear that you've rejected that. You see Judaism as part of your cultural background, if I'm reading you correctly, the way ...


25

For a good review of the significance of the wedding ring in Judaism, I recommend the section entitled "The Marriage Ring" of the book The Jewish Way in Love & Marriage, by R' Maurice Lamm. As R' Lamm explains, the technical purpose of the wedding ring is to serve as part of the binding transaction that establishes the marriage. While there's plenty of ...


16

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein was strongly opposed to a two-ring ceremony in which he says "harei at mekudeshet li" and she says "harei ata mekudash li", but in a later responsum -- EH4:32b (addressing R' Elyakim "Getzel" Ellinson, who was questioning men wearing bands and Rav Moshe defending the practice) he clarifies that for a man to simply wear a band is not ...


12

The original question as well as @SAH challenge seem to imply that the Torah forbids piercings. This belief is possibly coming from the prohibition of tatoos as the prohibition to injure oneself. But as we will say the halacha doesn't necessarily consider all body piercings forbidden. As context, plastic surgery (a more extreme form of bodily injury for ...


12

The Minhag is mentioned in sources as early as the Teshuvas HaGeonim (Harkavy no. 65) and the Zohar, quoted by the Rama in Even Ha'Ezer 27:1. It is indeed a Minhag, and is quoted as such in many places (such as here, the Nitei Gavriel) The Rogotchover in his commentary to Rambam Ishus 3:1 gives the custom a creative halakhic basis: today, when Kiddushin and ...


11

The only thing that would be offensive is if you posed as accepting the Jewish faith and then went around telling everyone that they have to believe in Jesus.


11

In theory, as long as it's intrinsically worth a perutah it's good enough, but there can be no misunderstandings about what it is! If she thinks she's getting a diamond when in fact you're giving her a cubic zirconia, then it could be claimed the kiddushin occurred under false pretenses. So we avoid stones or fancy engravings. THEREFORE, to avoid any chance ...


11

Read Igros Moshe Choshen Mishpat 2:65 and 66 who discusses elective surgery and difference between destructive wounds and unharmful wounds.The tshuvah is very lengthy and goes through the gemara,Tosfos and Rambam. At the end of the tshuvah he brings a gemara in Bechoros 45a which brings a case of a person who has an extra finger and then removes it, it is ...


10

Halachically speaking a person does not have to use a ring for kiddushin (thus the woman need not wear it). Additionally, after the ceremony is over, the wife does not have to keep whatever object that she was given (unlike the kesuvah). However, it has become a standard custom in our society for the wife to wear a wedding ring as a sign that she is married....


10

This question was posed to R. Moshe Feinstein by R. Ephraim Greenblatt in 1969, and is recorded in Igros Moshe E.H. 3:18. In the first paragraph he explains that the kiddushin is still effective even with a double-ring-ceremony: בדבר אלו שאחר שהחתן קדש בטבעת את הכלה נתנה גם הכלה להחתן טבעת ואמרה הריני מקודשת לך או אתה מקודש לי ודאי לענין הקידושין מאחר ...


9

To answer the last part of the question that wasn't addressed yet. Is there any significance as to why a specific stone was assigned to a specific tribe? Was it something within the color, or the texture or strength of the stone that made it appropriate? "Hoshen," by ברי"א. Used with permission per CC BY-SA 2.5 This is Rabbeinu Bechaye's explanation. I ...


8

Any item which upon acquiring would typically warrant the berachah, then even if the item was previously used/owned by another party (think: house) the Shulchan Aruch rules (OC §233:3) that the berachah is recited.


7

This can be found in Rashi, Onkelos, and Ibn Ezra. To cite a post about this on Balashon: The word tzohar (or tsohar) appears only here in the Tanach and there are a number of explanations for the meaning: window (Onkelos, Rashi, Ibn Ezra) - based on tsohorayim צהרים - noon. The light of noon is compared to the light entering the ark via the window. Also ...


7

The Lubavitcher Rebbe specifically discouraged giving a ring at any time during the engagement. (The practice in Chabad is to give the diamond ring* in the Cheder HaYichud after the Chuppa, and even other gifts are not given directly, or at least not with witnesses). This is apparently explained at length in a Sicha of Nasso 5741, but I couldn't find it in ...


7

A star of David necklace is not a ritual object (just pretty jewelry), and I've never seen anybody take offense at one being given by a non-Jew. This is, in fact, one of the safest Jewish items you can buy; were you to try to select books or ritual objects, you would quickly run into matters of differences in tradition and would risk getting the "wrong" ...


7

The 3 letters on the back are one of G-d's 72 names derived from Shemot 14:19-21. See here. You can find websites online that connect each of the 72 names to different things, but I have no idea if that is authentic Kabbala or new-age mumbo jumbo. This was discussed somewhere else on this site, but I can't find it right now.


7

It means "cosmic match" and does not have any religious meaning (as the word "cosmic," as it is transliterated there, does not originate in hebrew).


7

פרקי דרבי אליעזר לז See here: http://he.wikisource.org/wiki/%D7%A4%D7%A8%D7%A7%D7%99_%D7%93%D7%A8%D7%91%D7%99_%D7%90%D7%9C%D7%99%D7%A2%D7%96%D7%A8_%D7%A4%D7%A8%D7%A7_%D7%9C%D7%97 And a slightly different version cited by R' Kasher: http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=51482&st=&pgnum=168


5

In addition to the Mishna B'rura (cited in Sam's answer and based on the Matei Efrayim 610:9) that says "they should not adorn themselves with the jewelry that they wear on Shabbos and Yom Tov, due to the dread of the Day of Judgment," Rabbi Betzalel Stern (שו"ת בצל החכמה חלק ו סימן ג) explicitly says that a person may wear jewelry (such as a nice watch) on ...


5

From the Mishna Brurah 161:19 writes that women who are makpid to take off her ring before doing work holds she needs to take it off before washing.He then writes but men who don't take their rings off don't have to since they leave them on unless it has an expensive stone which he would take off.From here it seems like it was normal to wear a ring. ...


5

There are a few opinions about the order of the names on the stones (Rashi says that they were ordered by age, from top-right to bottom-left), while Da'at Zekenim miBa'alei haTosfot think that the order is by their mothers (i.e. first all of Leah's sons, then Bilha, etc.). These two opinions can be found here. As for the connection of each stone to a ...


4

BS"D, Hakham Eli Mansour makes this connection 'al pi HaRav Shimon Schwab in his shi'ur on Parashat Ki Tisa 5774 (link, see 17:15-28:00). HaRav Mansour explains HaRav Schwab by starting with the fact that it was the men who gave the gold from their earrings to Aharon after their wives refused to hand over their jewelry for the purposes of 'Avodah Zarah (for ...


3

Several Mishnayoth and Gemaroth are linked to the question. Through these texts that we will discover the Halacha. The first appears in Mishna (Baba Kama Chapter 8 Mishna 5) "הַחוֹבֵל בְּעַצְמוֹ, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁאֵינוֹ רַשַּׁאי, פָּטוּר" It concerns the right to wound itself.The Gemara's Pilpulim evoked in this connection: the damage, suffering,Shame ...


3

Similarly to Shalom's answer, I've heard that a ring used for Kiddushin should ideally be made of yellow gold, so that it is clear what is being given and the value can be fairly easily ascertained. According to this explanation, even platinum or white gold should be avoided, as they resemble silver. Having said that, there is no real Halachah, that I'm ...


3

Targum Yonasan ben Uziel says that the earings they gave to Yaakov had a picture of an idol in them.


3

The basis for the rabbi's statement is a gemara (Suk. 37a) where it is evident that a barrier between the lulav and one's hand does not render the taking of the lulav "lekichah tama" (לקיחה תמה). Following this, the Bet Yosef (OC 651, end) cites an opinion that men should remove tefilin from their arms and women should remove rings when taking the lulav as ...


3

Silver was likely also in women's jewelry from that time. See Bereishis 24:53 and Rashbam there, as well as Shemos 3:22 (which he references). Various other Pesukim may indicate usage of other materials in jewelry, such as Shemos 35:22 (as it specifies the gold ones, implying there were some made of other materials). See Yeshaya 3:18-24 for a list of ...


3

Kiddushin is fundamentally the act of the groom taking the bride, not the other way around or both ways. Hence, a double ring ceremony under the Chuppah would undermine the very mechanics of Kiddushin and is prohibited. Doing so is also a violation of the Torah’s mandate not to imitate non-Jewish practices. (Iggerot Moshe (Even HaEzer vol. 3 Siman 18 and 25, ...


2

An edition of The Shabbos Weekly Halachos Series on Hilchos Shabbos provides the following answer which fits with what I was taught. Background: although jewelry and ornaments are not ‘clothing’ nevertheless they serve a function and wearing them on Shabbos is not considered carrying, provided that they are worn in the regular manner. [2] Chazal however ...


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