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37

Igros Moshe has a tshuva regarding smoking Marijuana. He forbids it for several reasons: It damages the body. Moreover, even if people claim that people are not harmed, their intellect is harmed, which is a worse damage than damaging the body. It prevents one from understanding Torah, Davening, and keeping mitzvos properly. One gives himself extra cravings, ...


19

Ben Ish Chai identifies two understandings of this aggada: (1) It's literal interpretation in which Rabba actually slaughters R' Zeira, and (2) the "explanation of the kabbalists", in which Rabba and R' Zeira were discussing esoteric secrets of the Torah, and Rabba's soul in some way triumphed over his R' Zeira's, in some sense "unraveling" his soul. (Don't ...


18

There are, of course, a lot of explanations about what happened here and what this story means. Shaloh (Torah Shebichsav, Tetzaveh) states that Rabbah brought R. Zeira to a level of Divine understanding, and with that divestment from his physical body, beyond his capabilities. As for the term "slaughtered" (שחיטה), he compares it to the phrase וישחטם במדבר ...


17

Reb Moshe answers NO you may not smoke marijuana Here are the list of his reasons: Firstly like the Ben Sorer Umoreh the rebellious son. A Ben Sorer Umoreh steals meat and wine and scarfs it down. He is addicted to physical pleasures, he will come to do anything to support his habit robbing and killing too. In order to prevent this we kill him before it ...


14

Rav Shmuel Kamenetsky writes on page 129 of Kovetz Halchos that a woman is obligated to drink a rivies of wine on Purim, and that she can fulfil this obligation with grape juice (see footnote 231). In footnote 230, he holds that since women are obligated in all the mitzvos of the day, they are also obligated to drink a little wine, but to drink a lot of ...


11

Just how many sources do you want? There are so many, like in almost any topic. Here are a few (limited to those specifically that indicate whether or not Chazal thought of drinking as favorable or frowned upon) A bit of Shas: Berachot 40a quotes an opinion that the Etz HaDaas was a grapevine, because we know that grapes cause sorrow to the world. ...


11

I have found that at Purim meals where no one gets seriously drunk, everyone tends to have an equivalently-good time. How good a time that is, of course, depends on the quality of the company, conversation, etc., just like at any other gathering. If you're looking for a great source of both holy and fun holiday-appropriate conversation-starters, I recommend ...


11

Rabbenu Avraham ben HaRambam writes: If God would forbid everyone to drink wine and alcohol as he forbade non-kosher animals and fowl, not all would be able to comply...such a prohibition would also interfere with the benefit of wine and the occasional need to drink it. And if our Torah would say "Drink but don't become intoxicated," it would not work ...


8

Even if there is a "psychedelic community" in Israel that approves of "magic mushrooms," that is not an indication that Judaism approves of it. In nearly every country there is a small group of people obsessed with psychedelic drugs, and they pretty much approve of them all. Since they are ideologues, they have no credibility. Don't listen to them. These ...


7

Maybe the reason to fall asleep specifically through the process of drinking wine is to remember the miracle which was done through wine at the different wine parties in the Book of Esther as outlined here: Can you use Liquor to fulfill Ad Dlo Yoda? EDIT: I challenge your assumption that the two rules are separated. The Rambam writes in Megillah 2:15: `...


7

The Gemara (Eruvin 64a): אמר רב יהודה אמר שמואל שתה רביעית יין אל יורה R. Judah stated in the name of Samuel: He who has drunk a quarter of a log of wine must not give a [halachic] ruling. The Rambam (Hil. Bias Mikdash 1:3): וכשם שאסור לכהן להכנס למקדש מפני השכרות כך אסור לכל אדם בין כהן בין ישראל להורות כשהוא שתוי And just as it is ...


7

According to Rabbi Efrayim Greenblat (a student of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein), in his work Rivevot Efrayim, it is inappropriate for a woman to drink intoxicating beverages, even on Purim. Source: Rivevot Efrayim (1:458), taken from http://www.dailyhalacha.com/Display.asp?PageIndex=&ClipID=1596


6

Most solutions to this question involve either a compromise on drunkenness, or on prayer. Either you can follow one of the opinions which allow you to fulfil the obligation of drinking without actually getting drunk (Rema, M"B) or an opinion that allows you to pray while drunk (see @Gershon Gold's citation from Nitei Gavriel. I didn't know there was a ...


6

This question is hard to answer the same for everyone. People function differently when they drink. Nitei Gavriel Hilchos Purim 73:3 discusses one who will be unable to preform the required Mitzvos should either not drink, or drink only a bit at the Seuda. Nitei Gavriel Hilchos Purim 73:5 also mentions one should be careful not to drink so much, that he will ...


6

I'm not sure the Elya Rabba really has a 'position'. He writes (669:20): פה פראג נוהגים לעלות במוסף, רק בבית הכנסת פנחס נוהגים בשחרית כמ"ש המנהגים [הל' שמיני עצרת]:‏ Here in Prague the custom is to go up at Musaf, except in the Pinchas Synagogue they only go up at Shacharit. He is just observing the custom in the different synagogues in his town. ...


6

Rambam Hilchos De'os 5:3 וכל המשתכר, הרי זה חוטא ומגונה ומפסיד חכמתו; ואם משתכר בפני עמי הארץ, הרי זה חילל את השם. Anyone who gets drunk, he is a sinner and is disgusting and loses his wisdom. And if he does so before commoners, he profanes G-d. According to the Rambam, the mitzvah of simcha on Yom Tov does not encourage or even permit drunkenness (...


6

As a man, I can only tell you what my wife tells me she enjoys about Purim. My wife enjoys dressing our kids up in costumes that sometimes match a theme with our Shaloch Manos and sometimes are just cute, and then showing them off. When I was single, I did not get drunk on Purim - I followed the opinion of the Rema, to drink more than my usual (which was ...


6

The Gemara (Krisus 13b) says that it is forbidden to declare the Halacha and to expound on the meaning of the Pesukim that have Halachic repercussions (see Rashi)when drunk. But can learn a Mishna since it is without intent to derive Halacha as we cannot learn Halacha from Mishnayos. תנו רבנן (ויקרא י, י) "ולהבדיל בין הקודש ובין החול" אלו דמין וערכין ...


5

Machzor Vitri Siman 465 starts with the words, "ליל שיכורים הוא" (my rough translation) "A night of drunkenness is tonight." I don't know how literally this piyut is meant to be taken, but it does mention wine. I've never seen it brought down by any Acharonim, so I don't know if it has any standing leHalacha.


5

The Mitzvah isn't to pass out or even to space out. The Mitzvah is one of Simhah. The Gemara, in my opinion, is simply saying that the revelry ought to be great. Asked to quantify it, it just went for the most extreme. I think it is, essentially, a license to get totally hammered. Not as a Mitzvah in and of itself, but rather as a function, or a measure, of ...


5

I'll go you one better - if the purpose is to not know the difference between "arur Haman" and *"baruch Mordechai", why bother drinking or sleeping at all? Of course, I'm not referring to the highly intelligent community that patronizes this site, but do you really think that most of the rest of us really know the difference while we're sober? This is ...


5

R' David Silverberg discusses some non-literal interpretations: The Maharsha explains that Rava urged Rabbi Zeira to drink during the Purim festivities, to the point where Rabbi Zeira took seriously ill. Rava then prayed on his colleague's behalf and Rabbi Zeira recovered from his intoxication. According to this reading, the Gemara relates this story in ...


5

The rambam in de'os writes that it is forbidden to drink in the afternon (when you will get drunk) based of the Mishnah in avos (3: 10). The Orchos Chaim is also in the Kol Bo, and their source is the Meoros to Megillah 7b who also writes that there is no greater sin than drunkenness. Rabbeinu Avraham Ben HaRambam writes (p. 556 in English Feldheim ed.) ...


5

I don't know for sure, but the following piyut seems like a good candidate, printed in the Machzor Vitri for Shachris of Purim: אָרוּר הָמָן אֲשֶׁר בִּיקֵּשׁ לְאַבְּדִי בָּרוּךְ מָרְדֳּכַי הַיְּהוּדִי אֲרוּרָה זֶרֶשׁ אֵשֶׁת מַפְחִידִי בְּרוּכָה אֶסְתֵּר בַּעֲדִי אָרוּר הָמָן אָץ לְנַפְּצִי בָּרוּךְ מָרְדֳּכַי בִּתְחִינָה ...


5

The Gemara Eiruvin 65a says that אמר רב ששת משום רבי אלעזר בן עזריה יכול יכול אני לפטור את כל העולם כולו מן הדין מיום שחרב בית המקדש ועד עכשיו שנאמר לכן שמעי נא זאת ענייה ושכורת ולא מיין מיתיבי שיכור מקחו מקח וממכרו ממכר עבר עבירה שיש בה מיתה ממיתין אותו מלקות מלקין אותו כללו של דבר הרי הוא כפיקח לכל דבריו אלא שפטור מן התפלה מאי יכולני לפטור דקאמר נמי ...


4

For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim. 2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba, ...


4

It seems that HaRav Musafi Shelit"a (Q&A 57,505) says that it isn't Asur, rather just not a proper thing to do.


4

The Talmud (Sanhedrin end of 70a) alludes to Adam drinking wine - although it isn't exactly clear how that would work given the time frame - saying that Noach should have stayed away from wine, learning from Adam with the sin of the Eitz Hadaas which was caused by wine - according to the opinion that the tree was a grape vine.


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