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Rabbi Chayim Cohen addresses this question in his Dose of Halacha: He quotes Rabbi Heinemann who holds that the bracha is subjective - that is it does depend on what you consider to be the primary food, just as you suggest. .. R’ Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe OC3:31) addresses the issue of chocolate-covered raisins, though is clear that one recites shehakol ...


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When two foods with different brachot are mixed together sufficiently that any bite you take would certainly contain both items, only one bracha is said on the food. Furthermore, in almost all cases, mezonot items are considered the ikkar in a food mixture. The only time when this is not the case is when the mezonot is purely to hold the food together. In ...


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Edit: The Rivash at the end of his tshuva #28 mentions a food called זיבליה which is made of flour and honey. He writes that he thinks it is not subject to the prohibition of bishul akum, because the honey is the main ingredient, כי אומרים שהדבש עקר, and that is not subject to the prohibition as it is eaten raw. End edit There is an argument between the ...


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The answer to the question may depend on a question of how ikar and tafel works: The standard approach is that the blessing on the primary covers the secondary. You make the blessing on the main food and it extends to the other food. This may be because the other food is seen as having become conceptually part of the main food, or nullified to it for ...


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You do not need to eat a kezayis of the ikar part in order to justify reciting the appropriate after-blessing for the ikar part. The source is Iggeros Moshe OC 4 (42) . Rav Feinstein ז״ל deals with the case where a person eats less than a kzayis of salty fish (the ikkar in this case) and a kzayis of bread afterwards (as the tofel). (See the example in OC ...


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Based on Hilchos Bkias HaPat and down through Hilchos Birkas Hamazon, it would seem that if you ate a shiyur of bread which warrants Birkas Hamazon (a kezayis), then you could definitely say birkas hamazon on that bread (why not? you're blessing kosher food!). However, if you rely on the halachic opinions that the other parts of a food object are "mashlim" ...


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FIRST QUESTION In the book The Halochos of Brochos, p234 Rabbi Bodner explains that if a person does not know what brocha to make a certain food, he should research the halachic authorities or ask a Rav. If he does not do so, he may not eat the food (unless he bypasses the problem). The problem here is that the person does not know what food he has. But ...


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Brachot.org writes: The tofel item needs to be eaten along with the Ikar.[Shaar HaTzion 212:21, Vezot HaBracha (pg 89). Even though the Laws of Brachos (pg 209) seems to argue on this, it clear from his examples and footnote that he's not arguing but just is using different terms than the Shaar HaTzion.] For example, apple sauce with latkes would be ...


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My Rav's opinion: Chocolate-covered coffee beans places it in the same classification as candy or a plain piece of chocolate, even if the coffee bean is the majority ingredient by volume. Thus, he considers the ikar to be the chocolate, as that is the reason people eat these items. Few people would eat just the plain coffee beans without the chocolate ...


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It is on the flavouring. According to the famous Birkas Hashem (maamarim 1, quoted by the responsum on the topic - see below), there wouldn't be a need for a Bracha on flavourless gum. People don't typicaly chew such gum today, choosing only flavoured gums. http://doseofhalacha.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/kosher-gum.html While there are poskim (Birkas ...


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Rav Yishak Yosef writes that you make the Beracha on the flavoring combining with the saliva.


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Independently and in addition to what @kitzur wrote, these questions are really hard to answer in general because they depend on the preference of the eater, e.g., one person might eat the sushi for the rice, another person might eat it for the fish and that changes the ikar. See for instance towards the bottom of here. The easiest practical way out of the ...


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if they're not cooked together, you should recite individual brochos on each item (i.e., ha'etz on the avocado, mezonos on the rice, and shehakol on the fish) only if there's mezonos from the 5 species (wheat, barley, oats, rye, spelt), then the other ones are considered "tafel" (secondary), and would not require a brocha


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