13

Shmiras Shabbas Ke'Hilchasa (18:44) writes that one may walk into a Reshus HaRabbim with an identification label that is sewn or stuck to one's garment.


9

At Yoatzot.org here, they answer as follows: If the sole purpose is to protect the woman's clothing, the sanitary napkin should not be worn. But generally speaking, most women are also concerned about discomfort or irritation. Embarrassment may be construed as a type of discomfort.


9

Bartenura Shabbat 1:1: ולהכי נקט הוצאה בלשון עני ועשיר, דאגב אורחיה קמ״ל דמצוה הבאה בעבירה אסורה וחייבין עליה:‏ The reason for discussing carrying between domains in the context of a poor and rich person, is to teach something tangential, namely that a mitzvah performed via an aveirah [i.e. giving charity while carrying on shabbat] is forbidden, ...


8

Even in a real public domain one can carry things within 4 Amot. (ShA OC 349) So he was allowed to pick it up and put it on. Then he's wearing it and can continue walking. (Though he might not have been allowed to wear it without enough clips to begin with...)


8

Tosfos Eruvin (86b) and Mishne Berurah (355:6) explain that since the waste initially travels into an extension of the private domain, it is permitted. Even though the waste might later travel into a larger body of water which would have the status of a karmelis, that is not your primary intention, and therefore it is allowed.


7

Firstly, as Clint Eastwood already touched upon, it is not at all clear that the waste one flushes will go to either a reshus harabbim (public domain) or a karmalis, at least without requiring others to act further down the treatment process: from http://www.thewatertreatments.com/wastewater-sewage-treatment/design-sewage-water-waste-water-treatment-...


7

If it is serving a decorative function, it's not a problem. (See Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 303 and 310 and Shemirath Shabbath K'Hilkhatha 18:12. Hypothetically, if there's a chance the one wearing it is likely to take it out in reshuth harabim, then there could be a reason to forbid it. See Orach Chaim 303:18. Also, if the hat has a stiff brim that is more ...


6

Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata (16:18, cf. footnotes 69, 82) notes that the practice is to be lenient and cites the following from Orchot Chayim (Shabbat 261) to try and justify the practice, though in closing with a reference to the Beiur Halacha (303:18 sv. Ki) he indicates how weak he believes the justification is. וכן האשה לא תצא בדבר שהוא חוצץ בפני ...


6

Kitzur Shlchan Aruch The Kitzur Shlchan Aruch in סימן פב - אסור העברה והוצאה מרשות לרשות explicitly forbids it. It's irrelevant if the child can already walk or not. סעיף י': הָאִשָּׁה מְדַדָּה אֶת בְּנָהּ אֲפִלּוּ בִּרְשׁוּת הָרַבִּים, וּבִלְבַד שֶׁלֹּא תִּגְרְרֵהוּ, אֶלָּא יְהֵא מַגְבִּיהַּ רַגְלוֹ הָאַחַת וְיַנִּיחַ הַשְּׁנִיָּה עַל הָאָרֶץ וְיִשָּׁעֵן ...


6

Mishna Shabbat 7, 3: THEY ALSO STATED ANOTHER GENERAL PRINCIPLE: WHATEVER IS FIT TO PUT AWAY AND SUCH IS [GENERALLY] PUT AWAY, AND ONE CARRIES IT OUT ON THE SABBATH, HE IS LIABLE TO A SIN-OFFERING ON ITS ACCOUNT. BUT WHATEVER IS NOT FIT TO PUT AWAY AND SUCH IS NOT [GENERALLY] PUT AWAY, AND ONE CARRIES IT OUT ON THE SABBATH, ONLY HE THAT PUT IT AWAY IS ...


5

I found in the Rivevos Ephraim 4:97:20 this question. Rav Ephraim Greenblatt asked Rav Nochum Kornmehl (Tiferes Tzvi) this question and Rav Greenblatt put it in his sefer: He answered that one should sew the feather to the hat because one might take the feather out since sometimes one will go out without the feather. Rav Yisrael Taplin goes through some ...


5

R. Neuwirth in Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata (16:24) writes that one should not wear ordinary sunglasses in a place where there is no Eruv because they are not considered clothing. However, if the sunglasses are never taken off even indoors (eg. for medical reasons) then they are considered clothing and can be worn even outdoors with no Eruv. In footnote 94 he ...


5

Harav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach paskens quoted in Meor HaShabbat Peninei Homer 3:8 in regards to opening up bottle caps (which some are makpid not to open on Shabbos) if one may open it for someone else who is makpid not open them. Rav Shlomo Zalman says that it depends on whether the one abstaining from opening it does so because they hold that it is ...


5

The answer is that it doesn't matter what the case is exactly. The Talmud is not responsible to provide an exact scenario. However! It's your lucky day, because the Talmud (ibid.) provides a perfect scenario for you! Here it is: אמר רבה הזרק ונחה בפי הכלב או בפי הכבשן חייב והאנן ותנן קלטה אחר או קלטה הכלב או שנשרפה פטור התם דלא מכוין הכא דקא מכוין The ...


5

See Shulchan Aruch HaRav Orech Chaim 301:42, at the end of the halacha. There, it is explained that one may wear two belts if each one is accomplishing something, and the wearer therefore derives benefit and satisfaction from it. Without being able to read your rabbi's mind, it appears that he was telling you that if you use the secondary shabbat belt to ...


4

Flushing a toilet is definitely not carrying because the network of sewage pipes under the city is a reshut hayachid. As to the outlet pipe, there is some delay and disconnect between the flush of your toilet and waste coming out the other end. You will contribute to the flow, but the stuff you flush only pushes out the stuff that flows out, so this action ...


4

Regarding the first part of the question, Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim 301:54) states (my translation): מותר לצאת בשבת לרשות הרבים עם סיכת ראש שנועדה להתפיס את הכיפה לראש, ואין לחוש בזה לאיסור הוצאה בשבת. It is permitted to travel between domains on Shabbat with a hair clip which is designed to secure the kippah on one's head and one ...


4

Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchatah (3rd edition (5770), 18:25) permits (for those who are generally lenient about carrying jewelry) a man to wear a "handkerchief exclusively designated for adornment in the upper pocket" (my translation) in a public domain. Sounds like your case.


4

The idea presented in that sugya of being kafus, tied up, as disabling the חי נושא את עצמו capability would seemingly answer your question as well. The following is the quote from that daf: ומודה רבי נתן בכפות דלא אמרינן ביה דחי נושא את עצמו, שהוא ודאי מכביד עצמו להישמט ולהתיר קשריו. The next quote is in the chavrusa app I have. His words echo various ...


4

Rashi indeed says that the 7th day of encircling Yericho was on Shabbos. Rashi on Yehoshua 6:15: "ביום השביעי" - שבת היה This siege was permitted on Shabbos for the Sake of Milchemes Mitzva (Conquering Eretz Yisroel in the time of Yehshua) as the pasuk says "Until the city Falls"(Devarim 20:20) which means as long as it takes to ...


4

I think it would depend on the agent's intent. The reason why one becomes liable for carrying when the item was predesignated is that the predesignation shows us that the carrier is carrying the item for the specific purpose (in the case of a seed, to plant it), and that shows that he considers the item "significant". Even though someone else carrying the ...


3

Tosefos to Beitza 2b s.v. והיה suggests that whether or not manna fell on Yom Tov is a dispute between conflicting midrashim. One medrash says: ויברך ויקדש ברכו במן וקדשו במן שבשבת לא היה יורד מן אבל בי"ט היה יורד "and He blessed it," "and He sanctified it" - He blessed it with manna and sanctified it with manna, as on Shabbos manna ...


3

Shepherds do not merely carry sacks, they use sacks as clothing/adornments by using them as raincoats, as Rashi indicates (see ד"ה בשקין and אלא). Women do not wear signet rings as clothing/adornments, period. R. Yirmiah is simply observing that when women occasionally carry signet rings, they do so by wearing them on their fingers. Therefore, while signet ...


3

I've seen a bunch of people bring umbrellas to shul on Shabbat and leave them open during in the coat room during service. I know you're not supposed to open an umbrella on shabbat but there's a different rule for carrying an already open umbrella. If you open the umbrella before shabbat it's permissible in an erev. The torahmusings link suggests that you ...


3

Many rishonim (medieval rabbis) say that the removal of an object from its area of 4 Amot (cubits) by carrying it in a public domain (רה״ר) is the equivalent (or, it is a תולדה) of removing it from its רשות, domain. This, for example, is the wording of the רמב״ן on .שבת דף עג: ומעביר ארבע אמות ברה״ר היינו טעמא דלא תני ליה משום דתולדה דמוציא הוא, דכל ...


3

I guess one is the roads by meka Since for the hajj millions of people come to one place in one day


3

If a person who drops an item of clothing that he was wearing in the road (kippa, belt jacket etc.) on Shabbos he should:. 1. pick it up (akira) without moving outside 4 amos cubits(cubit is about 49cm) from its resting pace (the floor) to its new place (to clothe his body)* 2. wear it and wait without walking further (hanacha). 3. After standing still ...


3

There are two different laws at play here: transporting from private to public space, and moving something four paces through a public space. Transporting from private to public means you start in your house, walk into the street carrying the item, and then stop. If, instead, you move continuously from origin house to destination house, without ever ...


3

The חידושי הריטב"א (succah 6b) explains that the Rabbis (Chachomim) assert that a kazayis is the minimum size that is fitting for eating so that became the standard for most eating related measurements (Yom Kippur being an exception) but it's still too small of a size to be significant with regard to carrying on shabbat whereas a fig גרוגרת is the ...


2

The Gemara Shabbos 8a says that Abaye holds that one isn't liable for throwing a basket 6 tefachim (to circumscribe a 4x4 tefachim square) by 10 tefachim. Rashi explains that the vessel is its own domain, and only objects were thrown in the mishkan, not domains. The Gemara (Eiruvin 90a) says that there is an argument between Rav and Shmuel whether one may ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible