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wikipedia: A yad (Hebrew: יד‎) (Yiddish: האַנט), literally, "hand," is a Jewish ritual pointer, popularly known as a Torah pointer, used by the reader to follow the text during the Torah reading from the parchment Torah scrolls. Beyond its practical usage, the yad ensures that the parchment is not touched during the reading. There are several ...


10

First of all, note that opinions brought in Avnei Nezer 2:500 that you need to have the candles lit in some sort of kli (vessel) and not just loose. According to these opinions, the menora itself is a mitzva object. That said, even if you don't rule that way we have a notion of hiddur mitzva even for things that aren't direct mitzva objects such as the ...


5

In theory I see no reason per se that would prohibit a non-Jew from buying and selling books, menorahs, and the like, if s/he really wanted to do so. An item on which the seller's word is required that it is ritually okay would be more problematic, but these days your matza, myrtle-branches, and the like come shrink-wrapped and pre-certified, so it's really ...


5

I once heard this question asked at an Arachim function. The answer given was that although Koresh had the utensils returned, not all of them made it back and therefore Achashveirosh used the ones that he still had. I have not seen a written source for this though.


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Elements for answer Shulchan Aruch Orach Chayim 40: 2 regarding tefilin and mezuzah at home. בית שיש בו תפילין אסור לשמש בו מטתו עד שיוציאם או שיניחם בכלי תוך כלי והוא שאין השני מיוחד להם שאם הוא מיוחד אפילו מאה חשובים כאחד.‏ הגה: ואם שניהם אינם מיוחדים להם או שהפנימי אינו מיוחד להם והחיצון מיוחד להם מותר (ועיין לקמן סימן ר"מ סעיף ו') (בית יוסף)...


3

"The sages taught: Tashmishei mitzva (objects used to perform a mitzva) may be discarded; tashmishei kedusha (accessories of kedusha) are buried. And these are tashmishei mitzva: a succa, lulav, shofar and tzitzit. And these are tashmishei kedusha: cases of books (=Torah scrolls), tefillin and mezuzot, a bag of a Torah scroll, the sack of tefillin, and its ...


3

Mishna Brura סימן צו ס"ק ז: " נפל ספר על הארץ ואינו יכול לכוין מותר להגביהו כשיסיים הברכה שהוא עומד בה ואי לא"ה לא יפסיק ". It says that only if you can't keep on focus the prayer you need to pick it up immediately, but by the way we learn that you should pick it up immediately if it's not during a prayer. To kiss it is a 'Hidur'. BTW, Sefer Hasidim says ...


3

You cannot benefit (hana'a) from items of Hekdesh or you may violate the Biblical prohibition of meilah. Viewing an item would not be meilah, but may be forbidden rabbinically if it is avoidable. I'm not sure if viewing an ancient item in a museum would be considered hana'a, but if it is, then it seems it would be rabbinically forbidden. This means even ...


3

I would first start with the Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 282:7: אסור לישב על המטה שספר תורה עליה. הגה: וכל שכן שאסור להניחה על גבי קרקע. והוא הדין שאר ספרים (ב"י בשם הר"ר מנוח ובשם א"ח וכל בו). ואפילו על המדרגות שעושין לפי ארון הקדש אסור להניח ספרים (הנמי"י). ולא יניח אדם ספר תורה על ברכיו וב' אצילי ידיו עליו (מהרי"ל). ונראה לי דהוא הדין שאר ספרים One ...


2

Meseches Sofrim 20 seems to imply as much. One may not light an old lamp; one who only has an old lamp may whiten it well in fire, and that is permitted. cf this lecture (around the 22 min mark)


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Actually, (based on a Gemara) the Kitzur in סימן עז - דיני הקדוש והסעודות בלילה וביום states that one is supposed to leave over wine from the night Kiddush to the morning one, and for the morning for Havdala. סעיף ז' הַכּוֹס צָרִיךְ לִהְיוֹת שָׁלֵם וְנָקִי. וְכָל הַדִּינִים שֶׁהֵן בַּכּוֹס שֶׁל בִּרְכַּת הַמָּזוֹן (לְעֵיל סִימָן מ"ה סָעִיף ג' וְסָעִיף ...


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One does need to remain fully covered in front of a mezuzah, as it would not be respectful to the mezuzah to stand naked before it. Where there is filth, such as children (presumably babies and very young children who don't know how to stay clean), it is good that the mezuzah be covered (YD 286:2,5). The Taz (YD 286:5), Aruch HaShulchan (YD 286:10), and the ...


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According to this (It's a Google book, on p. 154 - in case link has a problem,) the first use of the Torah pointer in Europe was in Northern Italy dating back to the 15th century.


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The earliest reference to its use is in connection with the schools of Bethar before the destruction of that place in the war of Bar Kokba (132-135). http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/15047-yad


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It seems from the Mishna in Arachin (25a) and the Rambam (Hilchot Arachin 4:19,20) that anyone has the ability to redeem a field that has been pledged as hekdesh. The only difference between the original owner and a secondary individual redeeming the field would be the need to add a fifth to the redemption price and the fact that if the original owner ...


2

Yahrtzeit is a minhag, although a fairly "strong" one. However, as it is a minhag, I don't believe that there is any kedusha attached to a burning yahrtzeit candle, and even less to an empty one. Years ago, the ayhrtzeit candles were bigger in size and had much thicker glass. My grandmother saved them for drinking glasses (yes, as kid I broke a number of ...


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You can find your answer here (Nedorim 20b, also see Rashi on "וכשהוא מספר") - the Gemmorah presents two opposite approaches: (1) "אמרה להן אינו מספר עמי לא בתחלת הלילה ולא בסוף הלילה אלא בחצות הלילה וכשהוא מספר מגלה טפח ומכסה טפח ודומה עליו כמי שכפאו שד ואמרתי לו מה טעם ואמר לי כדי שלא אתן את עיני באשה אחרת ונמצאו בניו באין לידי ממזרות לא קשיא הא במילי ...


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Rabbi Hayyim Angel in a lecture on Megillat Esther posits that the gemarah should not be taken literally. Rather, like the gemarah (ibid) which mentions Achashveirosh wearing the clothing of the kohen gadol, this gemarah is alluding to a theme that relates to Achashveirosh being portrayed as eclipsing God and Shushan as the 'new' Jerusalem


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I did not read the whole article yet (discovered through a comment on this site, it's on my 'to-read' list), but the cheat sheet found on page 15 of this magazine (Kosher Spirit Pesach 5768 [from the OK]) says that "A posuk of Tanach (if it was read)" must be put into sheimos.


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I just read here: https://halachablog.com/2016/04/13/the-shankbone-and-the-egg-at-the-seder/ that we actually eat it, since it was forbidden to leave it uneaten after a day.


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The 4 holy cities correspond to the 4 elements. Earth (Hebron) because of the cave of the patriarchs, Fire(Jeruselem) because of the temple sacrifices, Water(Tiveriah) because of lake Kineret, Air (Zfat) because it is high in the hills and the buildings being painted blue to keep out the evil eye and the spiritual, airy nature of kabalah which sprouted from ...


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