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17

In his commentary to Rambam's codification of this law (Hilchot Melachim 7:5), R. David Ibn Zimra asks: “Is it the way of women to wage war?” And he cites the verse (Psalms 45:14) "All glorious is the king's daughter within the palace" in support of this. He then suggests that the women were (not actively fighting, but) supplying food and water to their ...


12

The first individual to know of the Messiah was Adam HaRishon. This is stated explicitly in Sanhedrin 38b in the name of Reish Lakish, by Yose ben Chalafta in Seder Olam Rabbah 30 and Rabbi Yehuda bar Simon in Bereshit Rabbah 24:2 which teach that Adam was shown all the righteous, each generation and its Sages and those who would teach and explain the Torah. ...


11

A Midrash in Vayikra Rabba (23:10) teaches: שְׁלשָׁה הֵם שֶׁבָּרְחוּ מִן הָעֲבֵרָה וְשִׁתֵּף הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא שְׁמוֹ עִמָּהֶם, וְאֵלּוּ הֵן: יוֹסֵף וְיָעֵל וּפַלְטִי. יוֹסֵף מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (תהלים פא, ו): עֵדוּת בִּיהוֹסֵף שָׂמוֹ, מַהוּ בִּיהוֹסֵף יָהּ מֵעִיד עָלָיו... יָעֵל מִנַיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (שופטים ד, יח): וַתֵּצֵא יָעֵל לִקְרַאת ...


11

Yachin there: אשה לאו בת מלחמה. רק לספק מזון ולתקן הדרכים אף היא יוצאת. ‏ A woman is not able to combat, she did only provide food and repair roads.


10

Mishnah Zevachim 14:4-8 describe the times that bamot were permitted and forbidden: Before the mishkan was set up - bamot permitted Once the mishkan was set up in the desert - bamot forbidden While the mishkan was in Gilgal - bamot permitted While the mishkan was in Shiloh - bamot forbidden While the mishkan was in Nov and Giv'on - bamot permitted Once the ...


8

Bartenura to Mishnah Yadayim 4:6 explains the name as follows: פרושים. לחכמי ישראל היו קורין פרושים, לפי שאוכלין חוליהן בטהרה ופרושים ממגע עם הארץ, דתנן בגדי עם הארץ מדרס לפרושים: To the Sages of Israel [the Tzedukim] would call Perushim [lit. “those who separate”], for they would eat their non-sacred food in purity and separate from touching Amei Ha’...


8

According to the Midrash Tanchuma (Lech Lecha #8) the Dead Sea apparently became salty due to the sins of those involved in the war of the four kings against the five kings. הוא ים המלח שבעונם נעשה אותו עמק למים מלוחים וכן הוא אומר ארץ פרי למלחה למה מרעת יושבי בה It is the Dead sea, for in their sins that valley was made into salty waters. And so it ...


8

Yevamos (62b): שנים עשר אלף זוגים תלמידים היו לו לרבי עקיבא מגבת עד אנטיפרס וכולן מתו בפרק אחד מפני שלא נהגו כבוד זה לזה והיה העולם שמם עד שבא ר"ע אצל רבותינו שבדרום ושנאה להם ר"מ ור' יהודה ור' יוסי ורבי שמעון ורבי אלעזר בן שמוע והם הם העמידו תורה אותה שעה Rabbi Akiva had twelve thousand pairs of students in an area of land that stretched from ...


8

Two basic answers exist to this question: In reality, when the calendar was decided by testimony of the new moon, this phrase probably did not exist in the prayers. Maseches Sofrim 19:4 writes: בחג שבועות אומר ביום טוב מקרא קודש הזה וביום חג השבועות הזה וערבית שחרית ומנחה שוין בתפלות In fact, the Ritva (to Shabbos 86b) and Rivash (Shut no. 96) imply ...


8

Indeed, this is the same person. The entry for "David ben Solomon ibn Zimra (Radbaz)" in The Responsa Literature states: He conducted a large yeshiba and many famous scholars were his pupils. The great talmudic author, Bezalel Ashkenazi, was one of them; and Isaac Luria, the world-famous kabbalist, was another. As for your impression about devoting his ...


7

The Sdei Chemed (vol. 9, Klalei HaPoskim 10:2) delineates the order of authority and reverse chronology as follows: Shu"t HaRashba Torat HaBayit / Avodat HaKodesh / Piskei Challah / Shaar HaMayim Chiddushei HaRashba He does bring a Pri Megadim who considers the possibility that certain Teshuvot were written prior to the Torat HaBayit and leaves it ...


7

The Tosfos Yom Tov explains that the very fact that woman wouldn't go out at night on their own out of fear, led them to form groups in order to provide safety in numbers, where they would be able to spin flax at night at times of the month when the moon was bright enough to use it's light. Inevitably once together, any rumors about local bad behavior would ...


7

In Melachim II, chapter 22 during the time of King Josiah the High Priest Hilkiah found the "scroll of the law" in the temple. This chapter does not imply that it was necessarily the only such copy of the law (and it's not clear whether it refers to the whole or only part of the Torah), but from the reaction of the king we can infer that its contents were ...


7

Rav Yehoshua ibn Shu’ib, Rabbi Mordecai ben Abraham Benet, and the Mateh Moshe (Laws of Shavuot 690) explain that for this reason the more general word 'time' is used instead of the more precise 'day' (the term usually used to refer to a one day holiday), because it hasn't always been the exact day, but it always is in the general time frame of Matan Torah. ...


7

The Challenge of Creation by R. Natan Slifkin Torah, Chazal, and Science by R. Moshe Meiselman These two books contain very different approaches; in fact, the latter may be considered largely a rebuttal to the former. Between the two of them, you should be able to cover the main approaches.


7

Presumably, it was buried, because there is a Chiyuv D'Oraisa (biblical obligation) to bury the dead. It is a question in the Poskim of how much remains of the dead requires burial, but a significant amount certainly requires burial. Yaakov was under the impression that the Kesonos Pasim had absorbed a lot of blood from the dead Yosef. That being case, he ...


7

A famous example is ציוּן לנפש חיה. The title means "a [memorial] marker for the soul of Chaya", referring to the author's mother.


6

The Book of Samuel only tells us of King Shaul having had 1 wife and 1 concubine. Shaul's wife (I Samuel 14:50): וְשֵׁם֙ אֵ֣שֶׁת שָׁא֔וּל אֲחִינֹ֖עַם בַּת־אֲחִימָ֑עַץ וְשֵׁ֤ם שַׂר־צְבָאוֹ֙ אֲבִינֵ֔ר בֶּן־נֵ֖ר דּ֥וֹד שָׁאֽוּל׃ The name of Saul’s wife was Ahinoam daughter of Ahimaaz; and the name of his army commander was Abiner son of Saul’s uncle ...


6

According to Bava Basra 14a-b, Moses’ scroll was rolled all the way to its beginning, and it only had a single pole. This allowed for it to be two handbreadths wide by six handbreadths tall. In practice, it was stored with a slightly smaller diameter, as they would unwind it slightly and fold some of the parchment on top so that it would fit in the space ...


5

In Sefer B'Mechitzas Rabbeinu pg.117 (by a close talmid of Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky -- I asked Rav Nosson Kamenetsky if he is reliable and he answered in the affirmative), the author writes that Rav Yaakov made a condition with Yeshiva Torah V'Daas that he will not be required to sign the semichas since he believed that one should know all sources from the ...


5

The Gemara in Sanhedrin (14a) tells of when Semicha was in danger of being lost forever. But Rav Yehuda Ben Bava saved it: בטלו דיני קנסות מישראל שפעם אחת גזרה מלכות הרשעה גזירה על ישראל שכל הסומך יהרג וכל הנסמך יהרג ועיר שסומכין בה תיחרב ותחומין שסומכין בהן יעקרו The laws of fines would have ceased to be implemented from among the Jewish ...


5

The Ramban wrote a letter to unnamed French rabbis in defense of the Rambam whose books were being banned at that time. "French rabbis" is how he generally refers to the authors of Tosafot (e.g. beginning of Pesachim). The letter is numbered 2 in the first volume of Kitvey Haramban (published by Mosad Harav Kook). The letter is also available online here ...


5

A similar concept is used today, in which a variety of symbols are used from various Rabbinical organizations to mark kosher food (bread included). Read more about hechsherim (singular: hechsher) here.


5

Jedaiah of Bedersi, AFAIK, did not author a book titled “Behinat ha-Dat”. One of his books with a similar name is his famous Behinat Olam.* Furthermore, at the end of the aforementioned book he affirms Maimonides thirteen principles except, as one publisher notes, he recasts then and rearranges its collocation (Behinat Olam, ch. 17, here or ch. 18 in this ...


5

What you were reading was the English translation of the complete works of Josephus by William Whiston. It was published by Kregel Publications in 1960 and the last edition in 1984. Whiston’s translation was published by William P. Nimmo of Edinburgh, Scotland in 1867. The footnote you remember was in Antiquities of the Jews, book 3, chapter 7:6. Whiston ...


5

In the context of the other coins minted during the revolt and siege of the 1st century, it is not surprising that the depiction of the species is less photographic of "full sets" and more representative of the mitzva and of the holiday. The symbol may have been an act of rebellion in itself, bringing distinctly Jewish practice, whose restoration they were ...


5

Prisha to Tur Orach Chaim 288:14 explains: פי' מצלאין נוסח של ברכות הלועזים לחולים מתחיל מצלנא אנחנא כמו שמתחיל שלנו מי שבירך כו'‏ Matzla'in means a version of a foreign [Aramaic] blessing for sick people which begins maztlana anachna (we pray), analagous to how our prayers begin mi sheberach (He Who blessed). For a version of this prayer, see ...


5

1) Rabban Yochanan ben Zakai was almost certainly Nasi for some time after the destruction of the Second Temple. Per the Iggeret of Rav Shrira Gaon (written 987CE): "ולא מצאנו אדם שנקרא "רבן" חוץ מן הנשיאים רבן גמליאל, רבן שמעון, רבן יוחנן בן זכאי, רבנו הקדוש." My Translation: and we haven't found anyone who gets the honorific "rabban" outside of ...


5

Traditional editions of the Hagada all share roughly the same core text, and many surround it with various kinds of commentary and supplementary materials. The core text itself is authorized by tradition; in that sense, I would say that any edition that includes the traditional core text is qualitatively more authoritative than one that does not. Other than ...


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