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2

It is a common suffix known in Biblical Hebrew as the 'locative hei' or the 'directional hei' in that by placing it at the end of the said place/location it transforms the meaning to "to that place". So חרנה means "to Charan" i.e. that he went towards Charan. It works with common nouns, proper nouns and directional adverbs. So for example:...


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Alex's answer above explains how such a word usage is allowed to be used in this instance. But why would it be used in this instance? As rashi and sifsei chachamin state in 28:10, he was going towards Charan, not to Charan. He stopped for 14 years to study by the school of Shem and Evar and only then actually went to Charan. The point being, that he is on a ...


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The Talmud (Yevamot 13b) states: ובית הלל כיון דכתיב חוצה כמאן דכתיב לחוץ דמי דתניא ר׳ נחמיה אומר כל תיבה שצריכה למ״ד בתחלתה הטיל לה הכתוב ה״א בסופה ותנא דבי ר׳ ישמעאל כגון אלים אלימה מחנים מחנימה מצרים מצרימה דבלתימה ירושלימה מדברה And Beth Hillel? — Since the expression used was huzah it is just the same as if la-huz had been written; as it was taught: R....


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לכנסה to bring her in. כונס he brings in or enters. Literally, כונס means to gather something into a building or home, as in נדחי ישראל יכנס. It is normally used about a person entering a building himself. This is also a standard expression of entering into the active stage of marriage (as opposed to betrothal, which is legally marriage in many aspects). So, ...


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I have always heard y'racheim. It's just an expression, so I doubt there are any sources available to quote.


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The Hebrew Wiktionary has confirmed my suspicion, the word פְּלַסְתֵּר is of Greek origin, and it comes from πλαστός, meaning invented, artificial false, spurious, fictitious, counterfeit This is also, how Rashi translates it. The Greek word is derived from πλάσσω, meaning to form or mould, and in a figurative sense to fabricate or forge.


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A few lines of the text are left out in the middle until the last few words. A correction of what was already translated together with the rest (my own changes and additions italicized): I did not find this explained, and this verse is not a necessary proof, because there (Numbers 31:16-17), even if she had no sexual intercourse, nevertheless, because they ...


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The word זדון refers to the Jew in this statement. Grammatically, בזדון is an adverb modifying בא, and the actor of בא is the ישראל. The commentators who address this understand it this way as well. Additionally, the statement compares intercourse with the Cuthi woman to intercourse with an animal: just as we don't speak about the willfulness of the animal, ...


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