Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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5

At lease according to some rishonim, any language other than Ancient Hebrew is not truly a language but rather an agreed upon method of communication (see the Ran in his commentary in the beginning of Masecta Nedarim, as well as the Raavad on the Rambam's hilchot kriyat shema 2, 10). According to the aforementioned opinion, using English letters (or any ...


3

The question is entirely apt, because it gets to the heart of the nature of the possessive form in Hebrew, called "construct state" in English and "סמיכות" in Hebrew. The question recognizes that the first term in a possessive relationship between two nouns, (called a "construct chain," which can include any number of nouns from two, on up) is the term that ...


2

The Mishna specifies that the reading should be only in Hebrew because it's true, as you said, that it's done in Hebrew. So it has to be on the list. This is so obvious, as you stated, that this is one of the items on the list that - when discussed in subsequent Mishnayot - where no textual proof is offered that it has to be read in Hebrew. Moreso, you ...


1

The exact nature of what God blew into man is discussed by some of the commentators. The Sfrono writes G’d personally blew a soul of life into man, a life force which had been readied to absorb what was previously called צלם אלוקים, “the image of G’d.” This has been attested to in Job 32,8 ונשמת שדי תבינם,”by means of the breath of the attribute of ...


-2

The meaning of Genesis 2:7 Usually the term ruach elohim is translated to mean “the spirit of G-d,” Actually ruach, in this context, means “wind.” Likewise, elohim means powerful because G-d is more powerful than anything else. Thus the correct translation reads “a strong wind,” and not a spirit. Verses 1:26 states, “Let us make man in our demut. Verse 1:...


3

In several places, pesukim say בַּסֵּתֶר, or at the end of a sentence בַּסָּתֶר, to mean "in private". Examples are Devarim 13:7 and 27:15. (Sometimes it's connected to the next word, like Shir Hashirim 2:14, and in those cases it's with a sheva. But that means more like "in the privacy of" so it's grammatically not comparable to viduy.) I don't see גלוי ...


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