13

R. Akiva Eger’s letter regarding the cholera epidemic of 1831 can be seen in Iggerot Soferim, 29. You can see a translation of a slightly different version of the letter here.


7

I know this is essentially a repeat of the other answers, but this is a matter of life and death, chalilah! The floating wicks you are using are designed for OIL - not paraffin. To quote the Amazon link you provided: FOR CHANUKAH & SHABBAT: Perfect for your Hanukah Menorah or to use to light Shabbos candles, these wicks fit almost any oil cup. ...


7

Regarding the spread of COVID-19, the National Association of Chevra Kadisha headed by Rav Elchonon Zohn stated the following guidelines: The following are suggested guidelines and precautions necessary to protect Chevra Kadisha members as they perform a taharah: Strictly follow the general list of universal precautions recommended by the CDC ...


5

Wearing Tzitzit helps reduce toothaches and teeth pains This is brought in a Hirhurim blogpost on Tzitzit: It is said that being careful in the observance of the mitzva of Tzitzit is a segula for preventing tooth aches. [Kaf Hachaim 11:17]. The Kaf Hachaim (Sofer), brings it here. He, in turn, is quoting the Kaf Hachaim (Palaggi) 10:12 and others, who ...


5

Probably this, from Magen Avraham 11:18: כ' בשל"ה ומט"מ שאל יחתוך בסכין אלא ינשכם בשיניו ע"ש: Shaloh and Mateh Moshe say that you shouldn't cut [the tzitzis strings] with a knife, but bite them with your teeth; see there.


4

Shabbat candle lighting, unfortunately, is fraught with danger, especially when you have toddlers and babies in the house. Generally, the smaller / shorter you can keep the flame and the shorter the flame stays lit, the safer things are. (I don't understand why most Shabbat wax candles stay lit for 4 hours, and some, as much as 6 hours. Do we need them on ...


3

It’s brought from R. Nachman of Breslov (Sefer HaMiddos, Shena n. 4) that one trying to fall asleep but has difficulty doing so should think about the belief of The Resurrection of the Dead. R. Meir Mazuz says that drinking a cup of milk before bed is sure to induce sleep. He corroborates its efficacy by the episode of Yael and Sisera (Mekor Ne’eman n. 342; ...


3

SA Yoreh Deah 55:1 (transl: Nishmat Avraham) One may not receive treatment from an idolater for any injury or disease which is so dangerous that Shabbat laws could be set aside for the purpose. However, if he is a recognized specialist, it is permitted. If he is not, one may not receive treatment from him even if there is a possibility that the ...


2

Start praying regularly at Henez Hahammah (i.e. sunrise) as it says in Tehillim 72:5 “ייראוך עם שמש” (“they shall fear you with the sun”) and as brought down through the generations to this very day as the most praiseworthy time to pray (see שו"ע או"ח פט:א). Anecdotally, I did this and started falling asleep even before I wanted to. Also, virtually all the ...


2

In the book Judaism and Psychology by Rabbi Abraham Amsel he tries to link Jewish thought to the prevailing Freudian psychology of his time. To summarise his point which is central to his analysis in each chapter: Jewish thought believes strongly that our neurosis (non-biological mental problems) are deeply rooted in habits. Are we free to change our ...


2

Since you are specifically interested in the writings of R Moshe Feinstein on the topic, I recommend Responsa of Rav Moshe Feinstein: Care of the Critically Ill by R Moshe David Tendler which translates key responsa on the topic. See in particular Igrot Moshe CM II:73 regarding short-term prolongation of life in cases where further improvement is not ...


1

Each approach is endorsed by a posek. R' Moshe Shternbuch permits giving aliyot to those who will remain more than 6 feet away from the torah and compares it to the (Ashkenazik) permissability to give an aliyah to someone who is blind. Rav Asher Weiss disagrees and feels it is better to give all aliyot to the one reading from the torah. See the full, well ...


1

So in terms of first promoting physical health: 1) The Ritva on Shavuous 27a says one should avoid unhealthy food. 2) Similarly, the Tur (OC 155) says expressly how it is a mitzvah to watch one’s self to make sure he stays healthy in order to serve Hashem. As far as diet: The Rambam writes extensively about how to eat healthy in the fourth perek of ...


1

Possible answer: The Sefer Ta’amei HaMinhagim asks why is Iyar a time of healing? He sources the Bnei Yissaschar who teaches that most weakness and illness come from foods which do not comport with a person's nature or composition. Since the Manna began to fall during this month (on the 15th day of Iyar 2448) - and it was a perfect food from which resulted ...


1

When gedalai was told that someone was planing o killing him, Gedalia ignored it. He said oy, Lashon Hara, But it was letoelet. Many men died because of Gedalia's foolish actions. The people who died are considered to be on his head. That is why the passuk says these men who gedalia killed.{rashi, Mtzudat david}


1

When the great rabbis had ruach hakodesh, they were better trusted, even over the words of a doctor. In today's generation we don't know who has ruach hakodesh. There may not even be ruach hakodesh in today's generation. I heard people say that Rav Chaim Kaniefsky has Ruach hakodesh, but we don't know if he does. There are many great rabbis but if a rabbi is ...


1

Rav Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe YD 2:141:3) discusses the possibility of using the parsha of Krias Shema used for the Mezuza as a protective amulet. This video shows how to write the parshiyos of a mezuza - not that Rav Moshe suggests you should do so, but that it would serve as an amulet.


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