13

Proverbs 10:24 (translation following Rashi): מְגוֹרַ֣ת רָ֭שָׁע הִ֣יא תְבוֹאֶ֑נּוּ וְתַאֲוַ֖ת צַדִּיקִ֣ים יִתֵּֽן׃‏ The fear of the wicked person will come upon him, but the desire of the righteous is granted. Rashi also brings an example: מגורת רשע. מה שהוא ירא יבא לו דור הפלגה יראו ואמרו (בראשית י) פן נפוץ וסופן כתיב ויפץ ה' אותם משם (שם):‏ The people ...


13

The Gemara (Pesachim 110b) states in a discussion about the dangers of demons (that harm a person as a result of doing things in pairs of two): כללא דמילתא כל דקפיד קפדי בהדיה ודלא קפיד לא קפדי בהדיה The rule of the matter is that all who are particular about pairs, the demons are particular with him; and if one is not particular, they are not particular ...


11

Dayan Dr. Isidor Grunfeld, who translated Horeb into English, quoted the following paragraph in his Introduction thereto, on page lxix. He cites but doesn't identify an essay by R' Hirsch as the original source. If I had the power I would provisionally close all synagogues for a hundred years. Do not tremble at the thought of it, Jewish heart. What ...


10

As quoted, this passage comes from Dayan Dr. Isidore Grunfeld's introduction to his translation of Horeb, one of Hirsch's major works, Introduction, lxix. Although he is generally very careful about quotation, Grunfeld gives no volume or page number for this passage, merely citing one of Hirsch's "most trenchant essays". I cannot find any passage that ...


9

No. Deceiving anyone including a non-Jew is strictly forbidden. Even if the non-Jew suffers no loss.And even if the deception is not explicit lying. The Gemora (Chullin 94A)says: “Shmuel says, it is forbidden to deceive people, even non-Jews One practical example given there is sending non-kosher food to a non-Jew who thinks it is kosher. Although it ...


8

In his introduction to Eight Chapters Rambam writes: וְדַע, שֶׁהַדְּבָרִים אֲשֶׁר אֹמַר בִּפְרָקִים אֵלּוּ וּבְמַה שֶּׁיָּבֹא מִן הַפֵּרוּשׁ, אֵינָם דְּבָרִים שֶׁבְּדִיתִים מֵעַצְמִי, וְלֹא פֵרוּשִׁים שֶׁחִדַּשְׁתִּים. אָמְנָם הֵם עִנְיָנִים לִקַּטְתִּים מִדִּבְרֵי חֲכָמִים בְּמִדְרָשׁוֹת וְתַלְמוּד וְזוּלָתָם מֵחִבּוּרֵיהֶם; וּמִדִּבְרֵי הַפִּילוֹסוֹפִים ...


6

Judaism is a religion, not a regime, nation state or an ethnic group. The whole concept of a regime that exalts nation above the individual doesn't apply to non-regimes.


6

First, the science. What does science say about the end of days? Well, astronomical observations tell us that our sun is an ordinary star, meaning that it will age and eventually die like all other stars. The earth will have to die with it. So we will have to migrate to other planets to survive. Those planets will also eventually die. Physics tells us ...


6

Note: My answer ended up vastly exceeding the maximum character limit for a post, so I have split it into two parts. The first part follows here, while the second part can be found in a separate post. Below I have tried to provide a survey of the different approaches of the rishonim to this contradiction. All the sources are from their own writings, not from ...


6

I think you need to first define the word "right" in this context. The Ramchal (Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato) starts his famous work Mesilas Yesharim (The path of the 'Straight Ones') by stating that a person needs to clarify why he was created and what his purpose is in the world. He answers by saying that we are created to enjoy a close relationship with G-...


5

Aside from all the other answers, it's worth mentioning that no one studies Greek philosophy today. The thinkers that were so respected by (some of) the Rishonim are mostly irrelevant even to secularists. Their views on science were, well, wrong. For instance, Aristotle seems to have believed that a heavy object falls faster under gravity than a lighter ...


5

Rabbi Jonathan Sacks discusses the matter and points out that the Jews remain small because in order to be and remain Jewish, one must constantly make the conscious decision to follow Hashem and refuse to compromise. Consistently throughout our history there have been those who have attempted to increase our numbers by moving away from the will of Hashem. ...


5

A classic one from Berakhot 10a: הנהו בריוני דהוו בשבבותיה דר"מ, והוו קא מצערו ליה טובא. הוה קא בעי ר' מאיר רחמי עלויהו, כי היכי דלימותו. אמרה לי' ברוריא דביתהו, מאי דעתך? משום דכתיב יתמו חטאים? מי כתיב חוטאים? חטאים כתיב! ועוד, שפיל לסיפיה דקרא, ורשעים עוד אינם. כיון דיתמו חטאים, ורשעים עוד אינם. אלא, בעי רחמי עלויהו, דלהדרו בתשובה, ורשעים עוד אינם. ...


5

This is cited as law by R. Abraham Gombiner in Magen Avraham O.C. 167:1 אם שמע דין ונראה לו שהלכה כך מותר לאמרו בשם אדם גדול כי היכי דליקבלי מיניה If one hears a law and it seems to him that the law is as such it is permissible to say it in the name of a great person in order that they accept it from him.


5

The Netziv writes based on the Rambam that there is also a positive obligation to obey the Rabbis, from the beginning of the verse אשר יאמרו לך תעשה (that which [the Rabbis] say to you, do.) Otherwise, one would not be able to make a blessing on a Rabbinic mitzvah, as blessings are only said on positive commandments. Therefore, one can do a hiddur in ...


5

Reminds me of the four unsung heroes of Judaism who never sinned -- they're all supporting roles to the big biblical heroes. If there's no tension or drama, there's not much we can learn from them. I would argue for Avraham and Sarah, despite their trials and tribulations (which we wouldn't wish on anyone), for a few reasons: As messy as the business was ...


4

Who says Pirkei Avos isn"t halacha? 1) Major parts are codified by the rambam, tur and Shulchan aruch (see rambam hilchos Talmud torah which quote numerous mishnayos from P.A. dealing with Talmud torah; and hilchos deos, especially perek 5 which quote many more sayings. Tur starts off Orach Chaim by quoting the Mishna of "R' Yehduda ben Teima omer havei ...


4

R. Matis Weinberg discusses this topic at some length in his Patterns in Time: Rosh Hashanah (Chapter 4: the Humor of Din) as well as in Frameworks on Genesis (6: He Who Laughs Last). His thesis is that laughter is a response to the incongruous and inappropriate. And gevurah/din is all about recognizing the boundaries and limitations of what is appropriate, ...


4

Rambam refers explicitly to Epicurus’ views a number of times in his Guide of the Perplexed: On the eternity of atoms (I 73): These atoms, they believe, are not, as was supposed by Epicurus and other Atomists numerically constant: but are created anew whenever it pleases the Creator: their annihilation is therefore not impossible. On the non-existence of G-...


4

Of course. God says through the prophet Isaiah: ‘Oseh shalom uvoreh ra’ [I make peace and create evil]; Ani HaShem ‘oseh chol elleh [I am the Lord who does all these things] [Isaiah 45:5,7] Our faith consists of believing that whatever God does that may appear "evil" to us ultimately has a "good" purpose.


3

Judaism does not place the nation above the individual, or the individual above the nation. Judaism achieves a delicate balance between individual rights and community rights. Here are two examples among many. (1) To emphasize individual rights, the Torah asserts a person’s right to have enjoyed life before dying: [Before going to war] the officers ...


3

The answer draws extensively on Hakhel Email Community Awareness Bulletin, FOCUS ON TEFILLAH ARCHIVE . In the blessing in the Amidah of “Velamalshinim” the original purpose was to remove from our midst any and all heretical teachings and thoughts. The author starts with the approach that: We do not daven necessarily that the evildoers be eradicated. ...


3

Reward and punishment is a basic belief of Judaism so if someone does the right things he is owed their reward. The question is if will be given or can there be any expectation of it in this world. The answer seems to be for the most part, no.It depends on pre determined mazal and other factors. The Gemara Moed Katan 28A says: אמר רבא חיי בני ומזוני לא ...


3

Note: This is a continuation of this answer which needed to be split into a separate post due to exceeding the maximum character length for a post. R. Isaac Ben Shehet R. Isaac Ben Sheshet was asked to explain the difference between Ra'avad's view and Ralbag's view. After providing his opinion as to the differences he also gave his own view, which seems to ...


3

The work you describe sounds a great deal like Horeb, by R' Samson Raphael Hirsch. In it, R' Hirsch attempts to present a grand unified theory of Jewish observance. His methodology included studying all the detailed laws related to a particular commandment and then, using those and the words of the Torah, develop a theory of the commandment that explains all ...


3

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch and his teachings seems to have had what to say about this. Also, check out Rabbi Esriel Hildesheimer and the Creation of a Modern Jewish Orthodoxy


3

G-d can do bad, but does not. As Ramchal explains in Derech Hashem, G-d is the ultimate source of good, and created the world to bestow goodness on others. Doing bad would be against G-d's purpose. G-d gave humans the choice between good and bad so that they can exercise free will and so-to-speak "earn" their reward. In other words, the opportunity ...


3

R Avrohom Chaim Feuer has an entire chapter in his book The tzedakah treasury (pp. 406ff) regarding donations to non-Jews. He writes We provide financial support to the gentile poor (Gittin 61a, YD 151:12) [...] [R Pesach Feinhandler in] Responsa Avenei Yashpei (YD 1:193) maintains that one may deduct charitable donations to non-Jews from his maaser ...


3

Rambam elaborates on this in Hilchot Yesodei HaTorah 9:1 where he writes: דבר ברור ומפורש בתורה שהיא מצוה עומדת לעולם ולעולמי עולמים אין לה לא שינוי ולא גרעון ולא תוספת שנאמר את כל הדבר אשר אנכי מצוה אתכם אותו תשמרון לעשות לא תוסף עליו ולא תגרע ממנו ונאמר והנגלות לנו ולבנינו עד עולם לעשות את כל דברי התורה הזאת, הא למדת שכל דברי תורה מצווין אנו לעשותן עד ...


3

There is no one Jewish solution. I know of Rabbis who subscribe to Divine Command Theory -- the idea that "moral" is defined as "that which Hashem commanded". Which is pretty much the same thing as embracing the second horn of the dilemma. But most rishonim say things that imply they disagree. So instead, I will just give you what works ...


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