8

In Guide for the Perplexed 3:48 Rambam writes: There is no difference in this case between the pain of man and the pain of other living beings, since the love and tenderness of the mother for her young ones is not produced by reasoning, but by imagination, and this faculty exists not only in man but in most living beings. (Friedlander translation) ...


7

The Gemara (Shabbos 133b and Sotah 14a) derives from the Torah a mitzvah to emulate Hashem by being kind to others, to be a merciful person just as God is merciful etc. It doesn't differentiate between Jews and non-Jews. An additional consideration is the complex issue of the prohibition of lo sechanem, doing certain kinds of favors or saying certain kinds ...


5

On your second question, this is a view called "Neo-Platonism", meaning, attributing the roots of Greek philosophy, and in particular, the views of Plato and Socrates (but others as well), to the teachings of biblical-era figures. On Plato specifically, many Rishonim and Acharonim held the view that his teachings either came from Moshe or from ...


2

We find something similar in Tefilas Zaka, said by many on Kol Nidrei night וְתֵן בָּנוּ כֹּחַ לְהִתְעַנּוֹת בְּיוֹם הַקָּדוֹשׁ הַזֶּה וּלְהַשְׁלִים הַתַּעֲנִית בְּכָל חֲמֵשֶׁת עִנּוּיִם, וְשֶׁלֹּא יִגְרְמוּ מַעֲשֵׂינוּ לִהְיוֹת נִכְשָׁלִים חַס וְשָׁלוֹם בְּשׁוּם אֶחָד מִן הַחֲמִשָּׁה עִנּוּיִים כִּי כֻלָּנוּ זֶרַע אַבְרָהָם יִצְחָק וְיַעֲקֹב יְדִידֶךָ. ...


2

I think the truth is in the middle. It is fair to say that the presence of a machlokes shows there was no halacha l'Moshe miSinai, or else there could not be an argument. And in cases of argument, every Rabbi's ruling is binding on his community. However, the cases of arguments generally were in specific details, while the basic halacha was accepted. The ...


2

Rabbi Avraham Yitzchak Hakohen Kook wrote a work on the War called "Orot Hamilchamah" (Lights of War) or just "Hamilchamah" (the War). In the work, he explains what brings nations to war and what are the positive geulistic aspects of large-scale wars. Orot Hamilchamah was written during WWI when Rav Kook was trapped in Europe and couldn't ...


1

Note Rambam in Moreh Nevuchim (Guide for the Perplexed) Part 2 6:3: ודברינו הנה אמנם הוא ב'מלאכים' אשר הם שכלים נפרדים שתורתנו לא תכחיש היותו ית' מנהיג זה המציאות באמצעות ה'מלאכים'. וכתבו ה'חכמים' במאמר התורה "נעשה אדם בצלמנו" ואמרו "הבה נרדה" (אשר זה 'לשון רבים') - אמרו "כביכול שאין הקב"ה עושה דבר עד שמסתכל בפמליא של מעלה"...


1

R Avrohom Ehrman addresses your question in his book The laws of interpersonal relationships, p. 6, and writes that, although the commandment of love applies only to fellow Jews, the traits of love and kindness that are inherent in the mitzvah carry over to all human beings. He brings a number of sources to back this up The LORD is good to all, and His ...


1

Mishnah Peah, chapter 1, mishnah 1 These are the things that have no definite quantity: The corners [of the field]. First-fruits; [The offerings brought] on appearing [at the Temple on the three pilgrimage festivals]. The performance of kind deeds; And the study of the torah.


1

Perhaps you are referring to the following Talmudic passage, though it is not particularly about hashkafa? Avodah Zarah 19a והיה כעץ שתול על פלגי מים אמרי דבי ר' ינאי כעץ שתול ולא כעץ נטוע כל הלומד תורה מרב אחד אינו רואה סימן ברכה לעולם אמר להו רב חסדא לרבנן בעינא דאימא לכו מלתא ומסתפינא דשבקיתו לי ואזליתו כל הלומד תורה מרב אחד אינו רואה סימן ברכה לעולם ...


1

If I have understood your question correctly, you are asking how it is possible for a Rebbi to be on the level of an angel? Or more precisely, how can they resemble what is essentially a celestially-rooted being when humans are inherently ‘earthly’ in form? Rav Michel Yehuda Lefkowitz zt"l noted that the answer is that just as a מלאך has no personal ...


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