14

The Rama rules (OC 27:4 based on Teshuvat HaRashba 1:827) that there is only a problem of a chatzitza (separation between the tefillin and the skin) under the boxes not the straps. The Mishna Berura there (sk 16) notes that most later authorities only accept this for the parts of the straps that do not directly relate to the tying (ie. the parts between the ...


12

Here is a way to read this Rashi other that advancing corporealism: Usually, when we see Yad, it means to signify strength. So one might understand that Hashem will apply his strength against the Egyptians. However, Rashi here is saying that there is a metaphor here, of someone striking another. And that is an actual hand performing an act of hitting. To ...


11

Covering One’s Eyes During the Recitation of Shema cites the following explanation as give by Rabbi Eli J Mansour According to Kabbalistic teaching, one should cover his eyes during Shema while positioning his fingers in the shape of the letters “Shin,” “Dalet” and “Yod,” which spell the Divine Name of “Sha-dai.” This is done by bringing the three ...


10

Regarding washing on Yom Kippur, the Tur (OH 613) writes: ביה"כ...ואם היו ידיו מלוכלכות בטיט וצואה מותר לרוחצן שלא אסרו אלא רחיצה של תענוג ...וכן בכל היום אחר שעשה צרכיו וקנח או הטיל מים ושפשף בידיו וכתב גאון מי שהוא איסטניס וצריך לקנח פניו במים ואין דעתו מיושבת עליו כל היום עד שיקנח יכול לקנח בי"ה וכ"כ רי"ץ גיאת אם יש ליכלוך על פניו או על גבי עיניו יכול ...


8

What obligates something for immersion is that it is a utensil for eating with or preparing food with "כלי סעודה" Anything else has no obligation. See Shulchan Yoreh Deah 120:1, Aruch HaShulchan 120:30. Example. A mohel needs to peel a orange and the only knife he has to use is his mila knife. So while yes it's a metal utensil, and yes it can be used for ...


8

From: http://www.shmais.com/articles/stories/4232-a-story-of-the-rebbe-225-the-artist A non Torah-observant artist once wanted to give the [Lubavitch] Rebbe a portrait he had painted of him. However, the Rebbe noticed that the picture showed him with his fingers intertwined, and he explained to the artist in terms that he would relate to as to why we do ...


7

According to this article on Chabad.org, I don’t think there is a Jewish version of crossing fingers. You could try twisting them into a Star of David, but that is more likely to bring arthritis than good luck. Besides, we don’t believe that good fortune comes from signs and gestures. We pray to G‑d, do good deeds and have faith in the future. ...


7

Each plague was done with a finger of Hashem, as it says "אצבע אלקים היא" (Shemos 8:15) by כנים, and דבר was the fifth plague, making it 5 fingers, a full hand. (my) Source: Maaseh Nisim Hagada by Rabbeinu Yaakov m'Lisa (aka the Nesivos Hamishpat) quoting "the commentaries" While I was looking back through my Haggadas for the source, I found this as well: ...


7

Rabbi Yirmiyahu Ullman citing the Zohar says that Moshe Rabeinu selected judges by reading the lines on their hands. The Zohar notes that Moses was told to choose the judges by "seeing" them, from which the Zohar learns that Moses was to perceive their qualities in the appearance of their hair, forehead, countenance, eyes, lips and lines in their ...


6

Menahot (35b) records that the tefillin strap of the shel yad must be long enough to reach the finger. Rambam specifies in a responsum (159) that the mitzvah is affixing it to the bicep, while further wrapping is just to "complete the knot" but doesn't sound mandatory: קשירת הרצועה על האצבע היא אחרי הברכה ובה תהיה קשירה תמה ואין הקשירה על האצבע מוכרח ...


6

The Haggadah explicitly learns that the Hand of G-d refers to Pestilence from Shemot 9:3, where it talks about Pestilence coming from the Hand of G-d. Of interest is Shemot Rabbah 10:1, which quotes R' Yehoshua ben Levi's teaching that each of the 10 plagues came with a side-plague of Pestilence.


6

"Yad" can also mean "arm." The "sign on your arm" that you're binding is the tefilin box on your bicep. You get the mitzva no matter which way you wrap the straps around your hand.


5

Richard Steiner (quoted by Natan Slifkin) cites Rashi in Shemot 14:31: את היד הגדלה: את הגבורה הגדולה שעשתה ידו של הקב"ה. והרבה לשונות נופלין על לשון יד, וכולן לשון יד ממש הן, והמפרש יתקן הלשון אחר ענין הדבור The great hand--the great mighty deed which God's hand has performed. Many meanings fit the word יד, but they are all the same as the ...


5

I think it's the bayis, rather than the retzuah. Here are some reasons why: Rashi writes (Devarim 6:8): וקשרתם לאות על ידך: אלו תפילין שבזרוע And you shall tie them for a sign on your hand: these are the tefillin of the forearm It sounds like the part of the תפילין של יד that is the sign is the part that goes on the forearm; however, I'm not sure ...


4

In the selection of kohanim in the mikdash they used a lottery. The "no thumbs" rule seems to serve the practical purpose of not allowing confusion or deception when fingers of many people are held out to be chosen. If a kohen were to put out a thumb it could be placed far enough away from his other finger (assuming many people's hands were tightly packed) ...


4

It is stated here in the name of Rabbi Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg, that pointing with the pinkie finger, is a symbolism for approaching Torah with humility and a sense of smallness, just like the pinkie which is the smallest of the fingers.


4

There are a few different phrases, depending on context: If discussing something that you hope won't happen - בלי עין הרע, bli ayin hara - without the evil eye. If discussing something, usually an event, that you are planning on having happen and hope it will happen as planned - בשעה טובה ומוצלחת, b'sha'ah tovah umutzlachas - in a good and successful time (...


4

Rashi to Exodus (2:5): על יד היאור. אצל היאור, כמו ראו חלקת יואב אל ידי (שמואל-ב יד, ל.), והוא לשון יד ממש, שיד האדם סמוכה לו. ורבותינו דרשו, (סוטה יב:) הולכות לשון מיתה, כמו הנה אנכי הולך למות, (בראשית כה, לב.) הולכות למות לפי (צ) שמיחו בה, והכתוב מסייען, כי למה לנו לכתוב ונערותיה הולכות I'm not clear on his exact intent, but it is evident that "yad ...


4

Medicated cream prescribed by a doctor, etc. is problematic. Regular soft moisturizer cream that can be properly absorbed can be applied.. See http://doseofhalacha.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/cream-on-shabbos.html The Gemara (Shabbos 146) writes that it is forbidden miderabanan to spread oil, as it is similar to the act of memarayach, which is forbidden ...


4

The Aruch Hashulchan 91:7 writes כתבו רבותינו בעלי השולחן ערוך בסעיף ו: דרך החכמים ותלמידיהם שלא יתפללו אלא כשהם עטופים. ובעת הזעם יש לחבק הידים בשעת התפילה כעבדא קמי מאריה. ובעת שלום יש להתקשט בבגדים נאים להתפלל. עד כאן לשונו, וכבר כתבנו מזה. ו"חיבוק ידים" הוא שחובק אצבעות ידיו זה בשל זה, כאדם ששובר אצבעותיו כשמצטער. ויש מהחכמים שהיו עושים כן גם ...


4

Kaf Hachaim 262:17 says that there is a Inyan to kiss the hand of a Gadol who wrote Chidushei Torah and to get a Bracha from them.


4

R. Abarbanel (in his Zevach Pesach) explains: The magicians had tried to replicate the first three plagues, but were unsuccessful with the third, lice, which proved to them retroactively that all three had indeed been God's finger, as would any remaining plagues be. That's why they didn't bother trying to replicate the remaining plagues, and why Pharaoh didn'...


4

I assume they are also claiming to grind it lishma (with the intention that it will be used for the mitzvah) and that it's not as simple to rely on lishma by machine-made as by hand (as with regard to the remaining matzoh-making processes and printing sifrei torah). ...matzah shemurah must be prepared with the intention of fulfilling the mitzvah of ...


4

This source gives the general guidelines of what is considered chatzitza for mikvah: According to Torah law, a barrier (chatzitzah) invalidates a woman's immersion in the mikveh when it meets two conditions: (1) it covers the majority of her body; (2) she minds its presence – that is, it is a substance that she considers foreign and plans ...


4

Rabbi Akive Eiger writes this in his commentary to the Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 89: 1) in the name of the B'er Sheva (74): מה שאין אנו מתפללים בפרישת כפים כמו שמצינו במקרא כמה פעמים ובזוה"ק ובפרקי דר"א היינו כיון דעכשיו האומות עושים כן. וכמו שאמרו חז"ל על פסוק לא תקים לך מצבה באר שבע סי' ע"ד The citation to B'er Sheva 74 is a typo and it should read ...


4

I have seen many who do this in practice, and I'm almost sure that it's always to mark the name of שד-י. The only source I could find however is here, where the rabbi who is answering the question says that Rabbi Ovadia Yosef mentions this in his book Maor Yisrael. In my opinion this is much more of a minhag that is passed by people seeing other people and ...


4

My Rosh Yeshiva, Rabbi Leib Tropper, instructed his talmidim to make a shin shape of the middle three fingers, but did not explain it. Later, a very learned chassidic/yerushalmi friend of mine told me that this, together with a folded up pinky and a 90-degree-bent thumb makes דשי, i.e. שדי, and I have seen many chassidim do so.


3

Rashi in Bereishis 1:26 mentions the Pasuk in Melachim that refers to right and left of Hashem. Rashi continues, Is there a right and left of Hashem? Only it means those saying merits, which is referred to as 'right', and those condemning, referred to as 'left'. This clearly shows Rashi not accepting corporeality. As for the Rashi in question, it is more ...


3

There is no definitive reason as to why specifically the pinky is used to point. In fact, others advocate using the pointer (cf. R. Haim Palagi, Lev Haim vol. 2 §167 3.6) R. Meir Mazuz suggested a novel theory (Mekor Ne’eman vol. 1 §976) that perhaps the pinky is used to signify the verse (Isa. 40:12) “מִֽי־מָדַ֨ד בְּשָׁעֳל֜וֹ מַ֗יִם וְשָׁמַ֙יִם֙ בַּזֶּ֣רֶת ...


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