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8

Rav E Melamed writes here (Harhavot to Peninei Halakhah Berakhot 14:2) that today people generally encounter those with albinism regularly enough that they should not recite the blessing.


8

In general, a Jew is permitted to benefit from the melacha (forbidden Shabbat labor) a non-Jew does for himself or for other non-Jews. R Daniel Braude (Learn Shabbos, pp. 521ff) writes that a Jew can benefit from a melacha performed by a non-Jew for himself (if there is no need for more melacha to benefit the Jew), e.g., switching a light is fine as the non-...


7

The Rambam addresses the reason for the first 4 chapters at the end of chapter 4: וְעִנְיְנֵי אַרְבָּעָה פְּרָקִים אֵלּוּ שֶׁבְּחָמֵשׁ מִצְוֹת הָאֵלּוּ הֵם שֶׁחֲכָמִים הָרִאשׁוֹנִים קוֹרְאִין אוֹתוֹ פַּרְדֵּס כְּמוֹ שֶׁאָמְרוּ אַרְבָּעָה נִכְנְסוּ לַפַּרְדֵּס. וְאַף עַל פִּי שֶׁגְּדוֹלֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל הָיוּ וַחֲכָמִים גְּדוֹלִים הָיוּ לֹא כֻּלָּם הָיָה בָּהֶן ...


7

dinonline responds to your question as such The idea of pas shel shacharis — morning bread, or breakfast — is not an “obligation,” but is stated by the Sages of the Gemara by way of good advice. The Gemara writes that no less than 83 ailments are countered by “morning bread,” and a number of additional benefits are also mentioned, such as the ability to ...


7

The Gemara (Shabbos 133b and Sotah 14a) derives from the Torah a mitzvah to emulate Hashem by being kind to others, to be a merciful person just as God is merciful etc. It doesn't differentiate between Jews and non-Jews. An additional consideration is the complex issue of the prohibition of lo sechanem, doing certain kinds of favors or saying certain kinds ...


6

It writes here the following: May one read stories of Tzaddikim in a bathroom?1 Stories from Tanach and the Talmud are forbidden to be read in a bathroom as they are actual words of Torah. However stories of other Tzaddikim and Gedolei Yisrael seemingly may be read in a bathroom.2 1Piskeiy Teshuvos 85/3; Vayivarech David 15 2 ibid; To note that the sons of ...


6

Orthodox/Conservative/Reform are "denominations" of Judaism; "sect" isn't quite the right term. ("Sects" tend to vote in a bloc; good luck getting all Orthodox Jews to agree on anything politically.) Unless otherwise specified, you'll hear an Orthodox perspective here. The following answer reflects Orthodox Judaism. The Talmud ...


5

Per Machon Aliya Rabbi Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg Zatzal would put on Tefilin Rabbeinu Tam between Shekiya and the Zeman of Rabbeinu Tam. הגרח"פ שיינברג זצ"ל שנהג להניח תפילין במשך כל היום, היה מניח תפילין דרבינו תם מזמן השקיעה עד זמן רבינו תם Per Olamot.Net Rabbi Yechezkel Sarna Zatzal would put on Tefilin of Rabbeinu Tam after Shekiya. והגר"...


5

בדי השלחן written by Rav Feivel Cohen on most of the major parts of YD inc. Ta'aruvos, Basav VeChalav, Nidda, Tzedaka, Aveilus. On Zeraim, there is Derech Emuna by Rav Chaim Kanievsky. This is witten on the Rambam, not on the Shulchan Aruch - however it can be used together when learning Mitzvos Hatluyos Ba'aretz in YD. חלקת בנימין written by R' Binyomin ...


5

There is no halachic problem with sleeping with the clothes you will wear with the next day, and it is permitted to touch ones clothes while his hands are impure (עוד יוסף חי הלכות פרשת תולדות אות י). One should however be careful not to sleep with metal on him (like the belt of the pants), nor should he sleep with shoes (עיין פסקי תשובות או"ח סימן רלט)....


4

R Avrohom Ehrman, writing in his book The laws of interpersonal relationships, explicitly addresses your case and calls it leitzanut (mockery). Based on Rabbeinu Yonah in Shaarei Teshuva, he describes five categories of leitzanut. The fifth category [and less grave] involves making fun of people or their behavior simply for the sake of amusement, even if it ...


4

Shulchan Aruch 554:2 ומותר ללמוד מדרש איכה ופרק אלו מגלחין וכן ללמוד פירוש איכה ופירוש איוב:


3

As you are well aware, cutting down a fruit tree is subject to many prohibitions. You ask about pruning down which is more easily permissible. ShulchanAruchHarav brings details here Some Poskim rule it is forbidden to break a branch off from a fruit bearing tree [without one of the above-mentioned justifiable reasons]. Other Poskim however rule it is ...


3

Should one say a bracha upon seeing a person with albinism? I believe that the underlying question is: How are we to do we define the term לבקן/לווקן/לוקן and do albinos fall within its scope? The KSA that you quote is citing the SA (OH 225:8): הרואה כושי וגיחור דהיינו שהוא אדום הרבה והלווקן דהיינו שהוא לבן הרבה והקפח דהיינו שבטנו גדול ומתוך עוביו נראית ...


3

The Piskei Teshuvos 225:20 concludes that the Bracha should only be recited upon seeing a person who has a very significant change.


3

Using a dating website, with the exclusive intent of finding a suitable marriage partner, is considered a legitimate method for trying to find a spouse. However, merely browsing around the website, for some “eye candy”, is prohibited by Halacha. So you need to be honest with yourself, when looking at these profiles. Is this type of person, a potential ...


2

Halachic decisors prohibit ordering something which is guaranteed to be delivered on Shabbat in normal circumstances (see the last paragraph for exceptions). R Doniel Neustadt explains the general principle (here) Amirah l’akum, giving instructions to a non-Jew to do an action which would be forbidden for a Jew to do on Shabbos, is prohibited. It makes no ...


2

This article explains the halachic pros and cons of the Chabad mikva. Lubavitch mikva Common Mikva


2

I would say the norm is that even if one regularly prays in a early minyan, occasionally they can pray in a later minyan if they are running late. Therefore one would not suspect his neighbour of being Mechalel Shabbos. Regarding Gentiles seeing him do Melacha, R' Moshe Feinstein writes in Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 1:96 that Maris Ayin means someone thinks ...


2

The Chayei Adam (63,1) writes that the blessing is only recited on something which is very rarely seen. Based on this, if people with albinism are still a rarity in modern times (which I believe is the case) the blessing should be recited.


2

In Nitei Gavriel on Hilchos Aveilus (cheilek alef) perek 117 he notes that when davening Mincha by the house of an aveil, there are mixed minhagim. The case for saying we do, appears to have more support (refer to footnote 3): Pri Megadim, OC 131, Eishel Avraham, S"K 10 notes because "אין מידת הדין מתוחה" - "we do not invoke the ...


2

OU Kosher here writes as follows: There is a Biblical prohibition to cut down a fruit tree based on verses in Devarim (20:19-20). From the Talmud and poskim it emerges that there are several exemptions to this restriction. The prohibition does not apply in any of the following situations: (a) the tree is old and no longer produces a kav of fruit (volume of ...


2

There is no discussion of this in the sections of the Shulchan Aruch detailing the laws of going to sleep or waking up, or in the Mishna Berura. So it is safe to say there are no halachos about this topic.


2

We can't tell you about a specific river or lake without more details but can share the general laws of tvilat keilim in river and lakes. Note however that women should not immerse there without detailed instructions from their Rav 1. In summary a large lake, the sea or an ocean are kosher for tvilat keilim a smaller lake with spring water flowing in can be ...


2

The following are very helpful explanations, from more synthetized to more detailed Halacha Yomit R Doniel Neustadt at torah.org R Eliezer Melamed in Peninei Halacha, if you ignore the sources this is the more pedagogical treatment of the topic. You can start with chapters 1 & 2 for a very good ovewview The problem of the laws of muktzeh is that they ...


2

From Star K website; If a person ate grapes and, instead of reciting “ al ha’eitz” throughout the bracha said “ al hagefen”, he is yotzeh.3 [If he ate grapes and drank wine, but recited only “ al hagefen” without specific intent for the grapes that he ate, he must recite a separate brocha acharona for the grapes.4 (ii) If a person drank ...


1

Chabad.org explains the concept. Muktzeh (lit., “set aside”) refers to items that may not be moved or handled on Shabbat, the Jewish day of rest. One of the most famous Shabbat-related rabbinical injunctions, muktzeh was instituted to preserve the state of restfulness of this sacred day. The laws of muktzeh are codified in the Code of Jewish Law in the Laws ...


1

The Mishna Berura in 184:1 says that the same room is considered the same place even if you can't see the original place (i.e. a wedding hall) but if you have to be in a different room, then you need to be able to see the original place where you ate קודם שיעקור - ומפינה לפינה אפילו הבית גדול מותר ואפילו כשאין רואה מקומו הראשון כגון אחורי הפארא"וון ...


1

You may find "Aruch HaShulchan" By Rabbi Yechiel Michel Epstein (1829–1908) as a good choice. It is very comprehensive but not at the same style as M"B. However it is one of the best Halacha books


1

The Seforim Blog has an article discussing it. Rabbi Dovid Cohen who is the Administrative Rabbinic Coordinator of the CRC of Chicago has a shiur on this topic here. (It's part of a longer series of shiurim on kosher meat.)


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