14

See this answer He can accept the gift with intention not to acquire it, and discard it later. Although it is forbidden to touch chametz on Pesach, for fear that the person will come to eat it (see Orach Chaim 446:3, and Magen Avraham 5; Mishnah Berurah 10), this applies to circumstances where there is a concern for eating the chametz. Under ...


12

Welcome to Mi Yodeya! In answer to your first question, the Ramban on that verse asks your question - that is a lot of bread! He suggests that Avraham knew they were angels (which is consistantly the opinion of the Ramban) and the massive bread serving was a type of "gift" to Heaven. In answer to your second question, he stood by them to be ready to get ...


8

According to Rabbi Eliezer Zalmanov here in the comments, the earliest recorded source for this idea is in the commentary of Rabbeinu Yona to Pirkei Avos 1:5.


8

It is clearly stated in Shochar Tov, the Midrash on Tehillim chapter 110. זש"ה (ישעיה מא) מי העיר ממזרח צדק. ישנים היו אומות העכו"ם מלבא תחת כנפי השכינה ומי העירן לבא לחסות תחת כנפי השכינה אברהם שנאמר מי העיר ממזרח. ואל תאמר לזה בלבד אלא אף הצדקה היתה ישינה והעירה אברהם. וכיצד עשה אברהם עשה לו פונדק ופתח לו פתחים לכל רוח והיה מקבל העוברים והשבים שנא' (...


8

First, about Yom Kippur: A seder, and Passover, have nothing practical to do with Yom Kippur. Now to your question: There's nothing wrong with a gentile's attending a seder. Obviously, it would be tactless to bring up Jesus's last supper, or any comparison with Easter. (Moreover, it would go directly against one of the main purposes of the seder, which is ...


6

What I'd seen around the blogosphere was that it was an innovation by "Rabbi" (he was never formally ordained) Shraga Feivel Mendolowitz intended for Torah UMesorah community day schools that were open on Chol Hamoed (probably in the 1960s, I assume). Some of the students were not observant and didn't have a sukkah at home, so they'd take class trips to see ...


6

Per Rabbi Chaim Ehrman from the Chicago Community Kollel based on a Maharsham there are Poskim that say that since Hachnosas Orchim is a Mitzva therefore one may accept payment for one staying over Shabbos. However Rabbi Moshe Shternbuch in Teshuvos V'hanhogos 2:197 disagrees and says that one does not do the Mitzva of Hachnosas Orchim when paid. Does a ...


5

You are certainly welcome to invite him. He can chose whether or not to come. If the food is being prepared in a non-kosher facility, really the only things that he would be able to eat without special effort are unprepared foods like raw fruits and vegetables. There are ways to make kosher food in unkosher ovens; however, that could take considerable extra ...


5

Rama, Even Haezer 28:17, in my own loose translation: A guest sitting in someone's home who takes his portion of food and weds with it — she is wed. However, Bes Sh'muel there cites Bach and Taz as saying that marriage is effected only misafek (possibly).


5

Jewish Chronicle states Apparently, the earliest source for the custom of welcoming the Ushpizin on Succot is in the Zohar, the classic of Kabbalah. The Zohar makes clear that a central reason is to stress the importance of inviting guests to share the holiday with us: "One must also gladden the poor, and the portion [that would otherwise have ...


4

I don't know. But Rav El'azar Meir Teitz provided some data points (but the hyperlinks are mine): The comment was made that there is "a minhag amoung many chassidim to not eat anywhere except in their own house." This… was not restricted to chassidim; it was apparently the norm in Lita as well. My father z"l taught me to take nothing in another house ...


4

It's not an invitation to your Seder. It's a reminder\quote from the times of the Beit haMikdash (Temple), inviting people to share with you the Korban Pesach (Paschal Sacrifice), and the accompanying Matzo and Marror. That's why Ha Lachma Anya concludes with a prayer that we should return to Israel, and be able to once again bring the Korban Pesach. ...


4

The comparison to Succos is off base. As on Succos you are inviting departed souls. As SethJ mentioned in the comment regarding Pesach "how we can invite guests, given that each individual and family is obligated to eat from their own Korban, which means that your partners for the Korban need to be selected before the Korban is brought; you cannot invite ...


4

A solution that works for me is to ask the local Rabbi discreetly as to whether you can trust this person and eat by them.


3

Before Matan Torah the Kavana in doing a Mitzvah was what counted not the actual action that was done. That's why the item used to do the Mitzvah did not retain Kedusha. That explains how could Avraham Avinu, one of the Avos who was a Merkava to Hashem, make a 'mistake' by making Hashem wait while he went to do Hachnosas Orchim to Angeles that don't eat or ...


3

The source that Abraham's tent was open on all sides most probably stems from Midrash Rabba (48:9): אָמַר רַבִּי אַבָּהוּ אֹהֶל פְּלָן שֶׁל אָבִינוּ אַבְרָהָם מְפֻלָּשׁ הָיָה, רַבִּי יוּדָן אָמַר כְּהָדֵין דְּרוֹמִילוֹס, אָמַר אִם אֲנִי רוֹאֶה אוֹתָן שֶׁהִפְלִיגוּ אֶת דַּרְכָּם לְהִתְקָרֵב דֶּרֶךְ כָּאן, אֲנִי יוֹדֵעַ שֶׁהֵן בָּאִים אֶצְלִי, כֵּיוָן ...


3

It's a safek if one is yotzei like this or not. It's best to be machmir and send more to a different person. Mikra'ei Kodesh - Hilchot Purim by Rabbi Moshe Harari, 12:24. המזמין את חברו לסעוד אצלו ביום פורים, ספק אם יצא בכך ידי חובת משלוח מנות. וטוב להחמיר ולשלוח מנה נוספת במקום מנה זו. He cites the Kaf Hachayim (OC 695:42) for this. The Kaf Hachayim ...


3

Rabbi Eliezer Melamed of yeshiva.org.il compares Avraham's inviting guests to returning a lost object of a non-jew, in which case Shulchan Aruch (CM 266:1) writes (based on the Talmud Yerushalmy (Bava Metzi'ah 2:5)) that if the intention to return it is in order to sanctify Hashem's name, then it is praiseworthy. So too, Avraham's intention was in order to ...


3

There are many degrees and styles of kashrut observance. Some people will be fine just by not mixing meat and dairy and excluding non-kosher animals. Others will politely refuse to eat anywhere that is not 100% kosher (which again, is a definition that might vary even among the most orthodox) The best way to be sure is to ask your friend what his needs are....


3

Aish.com says one should light at home, so long they will remain lit until they return - or alternatively stay home until it is dark before going out to eat. What if we won't be home for dinner Friday night? Light your candles at home if you will be returning to sleep there, as long as they will still be burning when you return home. Otherwise, light ...


3

There are several points that can be made about this. First, this emphasizes that we are still in galus. If we were free and bringing the karban Pesach, we could not have said this. Additionally, we are making our guests feel better because they see us using "poor man's bread" and it might appear that we cannot afford better. On the other hand, a poor man at ...


3

The following is from Mishnah Demai 4:2. The translation is mine, following Bartenura. To keep things straight I’m referring to the people in question as Reuven and Shimon instead of “him” and “him.” הַמַּדִּיר אֶת חֲבֵרוֹ שֶׁיֹּאכַל אֶצְלוֹ, וְהוּא אֵינוֹ מַאֲמִינוֹ עַל הַמַּעַשְׂרוֹת, אוֹכֵל עִמּוֹ בַּשַּׁבָּת הָרִאשׁוֹנָה, וְאַף עַל פִּי שֶׁאֵינוֹ ...


3

Rashi is saying that the usage of the expression 'Na' (נא) has a connotation of something that is occurring in the present. And so the meaning is, 'You are Lords presently, since you have passed by me.' This would be in contrast to another usage of 'Na' as a request, like in 'please'. They take on this status of someone that Lot should serve, because they ...


2

The Sefer HaChaim [3:3 (by Rabbi Chaim ben Betzalel - brother of the Maharal)] says, "Inviting your relatives (to your house) is in essence, is the main mitzvah of HaChnosas Orchim!"


2

The קיצור ש''ע ילקוט יוסף in דיני ישיבה בסוכה בשאר ימות החג says it's customary to do so: יג נכון להביא כסא מפואר לכבוד האושפיזין, מעין דוגמא למה שמביאים בעת המילה כסא לכבוד אליהו הנביא זכור לטוב, שכתוב בזוהר הקדוש דאי לא אתקינו ליה כסא לא אתי. ולכן נוהגים לומר הנוסח עולו אושפיזין וכו'. ואחר שיאמר נוסח זה, יקדש מעומד, ואחר ברכת לישב בסוכה, ישב, ויברך ...


2

I found a nice essay on Hachnassat Orchim that mentions the following: If a loss or any damage will result from hosting a particular guest one would not be obligated to host him [Orech Maisharim 17-2].


2

Kovaitz Heoros Ubeurim asks this question and concludes that only for someone like Avraham who for him Hachnasas Orchim was "Umnoso" would be permitted to interrupt Tefila for Hachnasas Orchim, however for others it is not permitted.


2

Rabbi Yehonasan Eybeschutz explains that "Kol Dichfin yesay veyechal..." is not to be interpreted as an invitation, but rather as a statement of fact about the Seder. It should not be translated (as you did) "let all who are hungry...," but rather, "all who are hungry...". It is simply adding another detail about the Seder, namely, that we invite poor people,...


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