4

According to the predominant Yemenite custom, a “ד" without a דגש קל is pronounced as “th” (as in “the”). The authenticity of this tradition can be seen in Brachos יג, where we are instructed to elongate the pronunciation of the ״ד״ in the אחד of שמע. This is nearly impossible to do when following the prevalent traditions of the Ashkenazim and Sefardim, ...


3

As can be seen in this Wiktionary entry, the preposition את is [u]sed to introduce a semantically definite direct object. The first clause (ה' עוז לעמו יתן) contains no definite direct object (the direct object עוז (strength) is not semantically definite) and thus there is no need for את. The second clause (ה' יברך את עמו בשלום) does contain a definite ...


3

According to the commentary of the medieval rabbinic grammarian, R. Yosef Caspi, in biblical Hebrew, women are occasionally addressed in either masculine or feminine verb endings: ואין קושייא מאמרו אלו הכנויים לאלו הנשים פעם בדרך לשון זכר , כמו "עמכם" , "עשיתם" (לעיל , ח) , "והֵמה" (להלן , כב); ופעם לשון נקבה , כמו "לכנה&...


2

The correct verb form without the and should be: כְּתַבְתָּם – inscribe them. Although in second person plural the kamatz shortens to a sheva na, the tav won't receive a dagesh, because it doesn't come after a closed syllable. The syllabication of the word is thus כְּתַבְ-תָּם, because the sheva doesn't qualify for its own syllable. The same is the case with ...


2

There is halakhic justification for the custom of vocalizing a stress-less feri as a more grammatically correct way of saying the blessing. In his responsa Or Letzion, (vol. 2, chapter 46, halakha 34), the Sephardic rabbi, Ben Tzion Abba Shaul (1924-1998), wrote: יותר מדוקדק לומר בורא פרי הגפן וכן בורא פרי העץ ובורא פרי האדמה כשהאות פ' של המילה פרי רפויה ...


1

Sorry about the long quote. I didn't want to degrade N. M. Sarna's excellent coverage of this topic. Please credit this answer to N. M. Sarna. Ehyeh-Asher-Ehyeh This phrase has variously been translated, “I Am That I Am,” “I Am Who I Am,” and “I Will Be What I Will Be.” It clearly evokes YHVH, the specific proper name of Israel’s God, known in English as ...


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