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Obligatory Summary The Jewish day starts at night, but V'sein Tal Umatar is based on solar calendar, so it can sometimes be a day later. Plus the date was established in Julian Calendar, so there's also the Julian->Gregorian shift to keep us busy... Real Answer The Gemara (Taanis 10a) says that in Bavel we start saying V'sein Tal Umatar on the 60th day ...


7

The Aruch Hashulchan OC 114:1 writes that "generally speaking wind brings clouds from which rain falls and therefore we mention them together". Being that wind is not directly associated with the gathering of dew it is not mentioned together. However, Shulchan Aruch OC 114 does state that if one mentions "mashiv haruach" in the summer he does not have to ...


7

Bzir Aviezer - Rabbi Chaim Aviezer Morgenstern Zatzal explains as follows based on the Gemara in Taanis 10a which says that Hashem gives rain to Eretz Yisrael by himself and other locations through a messenger. Rabbi Yochanan who was in Eretz Yisrael said that rain comes directly from Hashem. Raba who was out of Eretz Yisrael saw the Malach Ridiya who is in ...


7

Daf Al Hadaf brings this question from Kovetz Bais Hillel He brings a few answers, two of them are below. Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach answers that when Jews went to Jerusalem for Succos they were still wearing summer clothing and were unprepared for rain. However when they went for Pesach they wore winter clothing and were able to travel even in the rain. ...


7

Rabbeinu Bahya Devarim 11:17: לפעמים המטר יורד מן השמים כלומר ממים העליונים, ולפעמים ממי אוקיאנוס שהן מים תחתונים, ואותו שהוא ממי אוקיאנוס אינו נקרא מטר אלא גשם, מלשון גשמות ודבר גופני, ואותו שהוא ממים העליונים נקרא בשם שניהם בלשון מטר ובלשון גשם‏ [S]ometimes the rain waters originate in the oceans whereas on other occasions they are of celestial ...


6

It's important to notice that there IS a verse for Miriam in the Hoshanos that we all said (or mumbled) just a day before Tefillas Geshem, and we must remember that Tefillas Geshem and Hoshanos were written by the same author, R' Elazar Hakalir. So clearly R' Elazar Hakalir valued Miriam's role as it relates to water and mentioned it in our prayers for water,...


6

In Israel, we shift to Tal UMatar on the 7th of Cheshvan, because that is generally when the rainy season starts in Israel. In Bavel, the rainy season started 60 days after the equinox, so that is the date used by Bavel. Likely your confusion comes from the fact that general Jewish practice is to follow the dates of Bavel even though the country they ...


6

The קרובות for Musaph of Shemini Atzeres is known as a שבעתא and, although many consider the main part to זכור אב (in מנהג פולין) or איום זכור נא (in מנהג אשכנז), the main part was once אף-ברי. This פיוט, written by רבי אלעזר הקליר, was originally split into seven parts (hence, why it is known as a שבעתא). Each part was for a different ברכה in חזרת הש''ץ. ...


6

Actually, the sixtieth day after tekufat tishrei is currently December 5th or 6th - it hasn't been December 4th for about a hundred years. We say it on maariv of the day before, because that's when it becomes December 5th. Think of it this way: we normally think of the transition from one day to the next as being midnight, but midnight is actually an ...


6

As a straight Halakhic argument, it's clear that "ותן ברכה" isn't needed from these two sources: Tur (OC 117) supports the usage of "ותן ברכה" with no reference to dew from the fact that the Bavli speaks of adding in a request for rain in the winter, which implies there is no expected special request in the summer. Clearly "ותן ברכה" is not a special ...


5

According to this article from the Da'at website: During the repetition of the amida, it is the Tunisian custom for the congregation to respond "livracha" (meaning "for blessing") after the words "Morid hageshem" (meaning "He brings down the rain", recited during the winter months) or "Morid hatal" (meaning "He brings down the dew", recited during the ...


5

I'm assuming you are dealing with the weather and seasonal-related issues, and not the possible International Date Line issues (which would make a fine question in itself). From this article by Rabbi Yirmiyohu Kaganoff shlita: The Gemara (Taanis 10a) concludes that in Eretz Yisroel one begins reciting ve’sein tal umatar on the Seventh of MarCheshvan, ...


5

This question is, of course, the subject of a large part of the 1st Perek in Ta'anis. The reason we begin to mention Hashem's power of rain on Shemini Atzeres (Mashiv Haruach) is discussed in Ta'anis 2a-3a and is related to the Nisuch Hamayim in the Bais HaMikdash. The reasons we don't actually begin asking for rain then (V'Sain Tal Umatar)are: Rain on ...


5

Taken from Artscroll's Daily Dose ed. 1 vol. 14 p. 272: Answer #1: The author of these piyutim believes that Moshe's sin was not hitting the rock, but for some other reason. Problem: Although it is not a sin, why mention it at all? The prayer is about recalling the merits of people relating to rain. Answer #2: It is referring to the incident in Beshalach (...


4

Tzlosa D'Avraham (by R. Avraham of Chechanov) suggests the following: The Ashkenazic minhag, to not mention dew at all, is based on an analysis of Taanis 3b, where it is implied that only after the fact do we not make a person repeat Shemoneh Esreh if he said it during the summer, but that ideally one should not do so. The reason behind this is that, as the ...


4

Since your need seems to be to figure out "when to start saying ותן טל ומטר in diaspora", I'll just focus on that (and ignore the mention of the tekufah in the title): To simplify things, start with the date November 21. You will then need to adjust based on two rules: If the following year is a Gregorian leap year, push the day off by one (i.e. November ...


4

I assume you use nusach Ashk'naz prayer books? "בקיץ באר״י" means not "when it's summer in Israel" but "in summer, in Israel [say...]". In nusach Ashk'naz, "morid hatal" is said only in Israel. (Open a nusach S'farad prayer book, and you'll see just "בקיץ" as the qualifier, since nusach S'farad says "morid hatal" even outside of Israel.)


4

I think the paytan was working the other way. He had a list of holy 'shepherds' in who's zchus we beseach water, he filled in the stanzas with something about water concerning them all. This is very apparent from some of the forced associations. The one about Avraham is all poetic and nothing literal. Mentioning Moshe being thrown in the water seems strange. ...


4

The word גשם occurs at an etnachta only in Prov 25:23, where it has a kamatz. It occurs at a sof pasuk four times (1 Kings 18:41, 18:44, Zech 14:17, Eccl 12:2), each time with a kamatz. All occurrences of גשם on lesser disjunctives are with a segol (Gen 7:12, etc.).


4

I have found three (somewhat overlapping) reasons. The custom of the inhabitants of Israel at the time the first Ashkenazi communities were starting was to say tefillot geshem v'tal before the amidah of musaf. This is attested to in the writings of R. Shmuel Aboab (1610-1694) where he writes in Dvar Shmuel 149: כמו שעושים בקהילות א"י וסביבותיה ... ...


4

The Talmud states: Taanit 3a-3b תנא בטל וברוחות לא חייבו חכמים להזכיר ואם בא להזכיר מזכיר מ"ט א"ר חנינא לפי שאין נעצרין וטל מנלן דלא מיעצר דכתיב ויאמר אליהו התשבי מתושבי גלעד אל אחאב חי ה' אלהי ישראל אשר עמדתי לפניו אם יהיה השנים האלה טל ומטר כי אם לפי דברי וכתיב לך הראה אל אחאב ואתנה מטר על פני האדמה ואילו טל לא קאמר ליה מאי טעמא משום דלא דלא מיעצר וכי ...


4

They do. Classical rites that mention dew in the second blessing consistently also request it in the ninth blessing: Sefardim say מוריד הטל and וברך שנתנו בטללי רצון Italians say מוריד הטל and ותן טל לברכה Yemenites say מוריד הטל and וברך את שנותינו בטללי רצון. Those that don't mention dew in the second blessing also don't request it in the ...


3

This is not a particularly satisfying answer, but I always assumed it was because she's female. While there exist some rare references to women elsewhere in Jewish liturgy, it's far more common practice to leave them out. (For example, I was quite struck that the imahot are included during yizkor -- it seemed unfamiliar after so many daily mentions of "...


3

Perhaps Miriam is alluded to in the verse יִחַד לֵב וְגָל אֶבֶן מִפִּי בְאֵר מַיִם and also in the verse קוֹרֵא וּמַזֶּה טָהֳרַת *מַיִם ר*וּחַק מֵעַם פַּחַז כַּמָּיִם Another thought: When Miriam was Nifteres it says that the water continued in the Zechus of Moshe who was still living. http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/112396/jewish/Miriam....


3

I have a book here that lists the Hebrew-calendar dates for starting "v'sen tal umatar" for the years 5750 through 5851. Counting, I see that in 26 of those 102 years (25%) Chanuka starts before that date. (And in two of the years they start the same night: 5787 and 5833.)


3

This is dealt with in the gemara in maseches taanis. We start the mention of mashiv haruach in the chazan's repetition of shemonah esrei for Musaf of Shmini Atzeres. Once it is started, the gemoro states that even when we have a second day of Yom Tov (Simchas Torah), we continue without a break. The question had been whether to stop after mincha until musaf ...


3

A possible answer is as follows: (Largely based on R. Yaakov Ettlinger in Bikkurei Yaakov 639:39 with a bit of my own twist.) It seems that the question is predicated on the fact that the Mishnah in Taanit refers to the rain as a siman klalah. If R. Yehoshua's objection is that rain is a siman klalah for the entirety of Sukkot, then indeed one can wonder ...


3

This exact question was raised by R. Shlomo Hakohen of Vilna in his notes to the beginning of Masechet Ta'anit, and he offered two answers: Matar generally refers to rain that is a blessing, while geshem refers to all rain. Thus, when we request rain, we request that it should be rain that is a blessing. When we praise the power of God, though, we refer to ...


2

Rabbeinu Yona in Berachos writes that rain is in the blessing of גבורות because it brings life to the world, like the other things mentioned in the blessing (healing, etc.). However, rain in the wrong time is a curse and causes rotting. Thus it was used as a punishment in Sefer Shmuel for asking for a King. So rain in the wrong time would not be relevant ...


2

Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 19:9 says: טעה במעריב ליל ראשון של פסח והתפלל תפלת שמונה עשרה של חול, ונזכר לאחר שהתחיל ברך עלינו שהדין הוא שצריך לסיים כל אותה ברכה (כמו שנתבאר לעיל סימן ע״ו) אינו אומר טל ומטר כיון שגם הציבור אינם אומרים. ואם חלה השאלה (הוא יום התחלת לשאול טל ומטר) ביום שבת וטעה והתפלל של חול והתחיל ברך עלינו גם כן אינו אומר טל ומטר כיוון שהציבור ...


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