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The quick answer is no. In שו"ע יו"ד סימן קכ"ד סעיף ב the Shulchan Aruch says: גר תושב, דהיינו שקבל עליו שבע מצות, וכן גר שמל ולא טבל – מגען אוסר בשתייה Ha-rav Leichtenstien claims that the שו"ע belives that it's not only a question of "What does this man do?" (an idolator), but rather "Who is he?". And that is why we can't drink wine that was opened ...


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The piece you quoted from Chabad.org has the answer. The reason it's forbidden to invite a non-Jew to a yom tov meal is because it's forbidden to cook for them on yom tov as the allowance to cook is for the purpose of fulfilling the mitzvah of seudas yom tov (which doesn't apply to someone who isn't Jewish). The rabbis were concerned that in the process of ...


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In the same way that Jews are preparing for the coming of Mashiach (e.g., in learning the laws of the temple and of sacrifices which are not yet re-activated), non-Jews should learn the Noahide laws. I am aware of two quality books that can help non-Jews do so The Path of the Righteous Gentile: An Introduction to the Seven Laws of the Children of Noah by ...


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R Shlomo Riskin (the Chief Rabbi of Efrat in Israel) writes indeed that a ger toshav can own land in Eretz Israel According to Rambam [Avodat Kochavim 10:6], the very term ger toshav, stranger-resident, defines the fact that any gentile who accepts the seven Noahide laws of morality may be a resident in the land of Israel, may purchase or rent land ...


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