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19

R' Eizik Vitebsker writes (look in Os 26) that the origin of this Chumra was from the Mezritcher Maggid. R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi explains that since some opinions say that flour which was baked (without being kneaded first) can still become chometz after contacting water as it may not have been baked well. He writes that (at least in his time) one could ...


10

From the Star-K: Matzos left over from previous years that were stored in places free of chometz may be used. TIP: If your oven has been kashered for Pesach, simply put them in the oven for a few minutes so the matzos will regain their crispness.


10

The roots of this minhag actually lie in the Gemara itself. In Pesachim 40b, there is a discussion which says explicitly that Rav Papi allowed servants in the beit Reish Galuta to thicken a tavshil with "chasisi." The Rif says this is matzah meal; Tosafot say it is lentil flour, and Rashi says it is dried flour. Rava says we need to be concerned in a place ...


9

Per the Nitei Gavriel Pesach Volume 3 Chapter 19:9 one may prepare them on Sheviyi Shel Pesach so long they made an Eruv Tavshilin.


8

According to the Bedatz of Crown Heights, It is told that the [Lubavitcher] Rebbe's household was accustomed to to eat gebrochts in the form of kneidlach on the final day of Pesach - regardless of whether the final day coincided with Shabbos. Naturally such foods can be prepared only if one had made an Eiruv Tavshilin.


6

It's interesting that another answer mentions the Alter Rebbe's answer as the origin, but fails to clearly explain the history of how/why this minhag suddenly started. Why isn't this minhag / worry mentioned by any of the poskim ?? Here is an excerpt of the Alter Rebbe's answer: ומה שלא הזכירו זה בפוסקים, היינו משום שזה אינו מצוי כלל אלא בעיסה קשה שלא ...


6

As per Otzar Minhagei Chabad, which in turn quotes from R' Leibel Groner (the Lubavitcher Rebbe's personal secretary): The context here is discussing the fact that while throughout pesach Chabad does not eat gebrochts (matza shruyah), on the eighth and last day of Pesach, they make a point to davka eat it. Quick translation: When the last day of Pesach ...


6

(Rice-flour matza should work — but I don't know of any on the market. I suppose you can make some. Consult your rabbi before attempting it. Beyond that, and more practically speaking,) I can assure you from personal experience that those who don't eat gebrochts or kitniyos or egg matza will never say "m'zonos" on the first seven days of Pesach. (...


4

The famous source of Gebroks is from the Shu"t of R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi (Siman 6) where he says "ובמי פירות פשיטא דאין להחמיר כלל כל הפסח" (One doesn't have to be strict [not to dip Matza in] fruit juice during Pesach). The simple reason is that it says in his Shulchan Aruch: וכל המשקין שבעולם שאינן מתולדות המים שיתבאר בסי' תס"ו הם נקראים מי פירות ...


3

There is a story with the previous Belzer Rebbi that his mother was elderly and could not eat Matza without dipping it in liquid. She originally refused to eat it that way. In order for her to eat the Matza as required the Rebbe himself dipped his own Matza into liquid and ate it even though he was generally careful not to eat Gebrochts. Thus one who has ...


2

Bais Yitzchok 2:44 discusses using Matza from the previous year. He mentions Tosefta Pesachim - end of Chapter 2 which says one may use Matza from a previous year so long it was made for Pesach. The Yerushalmi in Pesachim 2:4 indicates that it is a matter of dispute, however the Yerushalmi clearly indicates that is when it was not made for Pesach. He goes on ...


2

There are those who are extremely careful about Gebrokts, to the point where they won't have Matzah and liquids on the table at the same time/eat the Matzah over a separate bag, etc. to ensure that there is no way any liquid could reach the Matzah. There are many others who aren't that extreme, yet still don't eat Gebrokts. As the "worry" of Gebrokts is ...


2

They are nothing to do with one another. Eating only shmura matzah is a chumra (stringency) to be absolutely sure the flour is not chometz. Not eating gebrokts is a minhag (custom), mainly adopted by - although not exclusively - chassidic Jews. I think hotel etc. marketing is primarily responsible for convincing everyone that it is a chumra - since many ...


1

O.C. 461:4 says that bedi'eved (See M.B. #17 that defines outright a sick or elderly person who can't eat dry matzah) may soak the matzah in water and he fulfills the mitzvah of eating matzah. Gebrochts is a minhag. It is based on a stringency that matzah soaked in water might become chametz. Check with your rav. But, generally, given a lack of choice to ...


1

Does chabad eat gebrochts? I point out that because this is a rabbinic prohibition and a minhag of stringency, the last day of Pesach is used to show that it is not a full prohibition of Chametz. There is also a spiritual meaning to this. It appears that the eating the gebruchts in Chutz La'aretz is the significant point because the last day of Pesach is ...


1

Everyone eats "shmura" (guarded) matza. The question arises at what point the wheat or the flour must be guarded to ensure that it has not become wet and possibly turned into chametz. Once someone determines that they are following a particular level of shimur, then they can determine if they will or will not eat "gebrochts" because of the possibility that ...


1

My advice for Shalosh seudos is to eat dates or drink wine less than 3 reviis (see biur halacha) since the Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 208,17 says they are filling and one would be Yotzei sayng Birkas hazon on them since they satisfy the the eater (though of course the chassidim should say Me'ein Shalosh after). According to the Rambam (see Kesef mishne ...


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