17

The Ibn Ezra says - in his initial explanation - to guard it from animals so they don't enter and sully the garden: ולשמרה מכל החיות שלא יכנסו שם ויטנפוהו The Seforno says - if I understand correctly - to guard the fruit/trees? from rotting ולשמרה. שלא תפסד בהתכת הליחות השרשי הנתך בחום הטבעי וזה כי אותם הפירות הנכבדים היו מולידים תמיד תמורת מה שנתך ...


14

This question really touches on what the purpose of the Tree of Knowledge was. Why would G-d not want them to eat from a Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil? Isn't that the most important knowledge to have? In Moreh Nevuchim 1:1 Rambam develops an approach to understanding this (in which he alludes to your question). As I understand his answer, it is ...


13

The Lubavitcher Rebbe brings this idea in Likkutei Sichos (vol. 36 pg. 75 - free translation): The ultimate purpose in creating the Tree of Knowledge was not merely to serve as a test to Adam HaRishon that he should not eat from it, but rather for man to transform the Tree of Knowledge and elevate it above the concept of death. It is explained in seforim ...


10

Avot D'Rabbi Nattan (ch. 11) quotes R. Shimon Ben Elazar who is pretty explicit that this refers to physical labor; cited by Meiri to Avot (ch. 1). This is clear from the Hovot HaLevavot (Shaar HaBitahon ch. 3) and is the implication of Recanti as well. Sifrei (Ekev 41) writes that it refers to service of God Specifically, "to work it" refers to [Torah] ...


8

I couldn't find any commentators on the Midrash addressing this issue. So, instead, I will offer a deflection of the assumptions as my answer. I will argue: Fish, along with plants and bugs, were never meant to be immortal. Their life cycles and death were a matter of nature, from the very day that they were created. Therefore, there was no point in feeding ...


7

Bereishis Rabbah 19:3: וְהֵיכָן הָיָה אָדָם בְּאוֹתָהּ שָׁעָה, אַבָּא בַּר קוֹרְיָיה אָמַר נִתְעַסֵּק בְּדֶרֶךְ אֶרֶץ וְיָשַׁן לוֹ. רַבָּנָן אַמְרֵי נְטָלוֹ הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא וְהֶחֱזִירוֹ בְּכָל הָעוֹלָם כֻּלּוֹ, אָמַר לוֹ כָּאן בֵּית נֶטַע, כָּאן בֵּית זֶרַע, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (ירמיה ב, ו): בְּאֶרֶץ לֹא עָבַר בָּהּ אִישׁ וְלֹא יָשַׁב אָדָם שָׁם, ...


6

R. Aryeh Kaplan's commentary on the verse (2:8), from The Living Torah, states that Eden means "Delight in Hebrew." The Meam Lo'ez (which Kaplan helped translate from the Ladino) explains that "the Torah informs us that God planted a delightful place in the east." The latest edition of the Encyclopedia Judaica essentially states this as well. It discusses ...


6

Verse 3:22 would seem to indicate the former: וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים, הֵן הָאָדָם הָיָה כְּאַחַד מִמֶּנּוּ, לָדַעַת, טוֹב וָרָע; וְעַתָּה פֶּן-יִשְׁלַח יָדוֹ, וְלָקַח גַּם מֵעֵץ הַחַיִּים, וְאָכַל, וָחַי לְעֹלָם Here, עץ החיים is not modified with בתוך הגן, so evidently that is not part of its name, but rather a geographical indicator.


6

Jewish commenters do not believe the banana to be the Forbidden Fruit, yet mention of it is made: In the Middle Ages, the notion that the Forbidden Fruit is the banana appeared in several places. In 1277 Nathan HaMe’ati translated the Rambam’s medical work Pirkei Moshe (Aphorisms of Moses) from Arabic into Hebrew. In the section detailing the medicinal ...


5

Other bible translation say: God took the man and settled him in the garden of E'den to cultivate it and to take care of it.


5

Rav Ahron Leib Shteiman in Sifsei Aiyel pg.63 was once asked this question and he laughed and said there is no such thing and there is no source. He added in a joking fashion "go ask the minister of Gan Eden".


5

According to Rashi (see Beresihis 3:17), the land/ground began to produce flies, fleas and ants only after Adam and Eve sinned, therefore insects didn't existed prior to that.


4

Zichron Yitzchok brings a dispute between those who hold that Odom was supposed originally to live forever (Shabbos 55b, Koheles Rabboh on Bereishis 3:18) but because of his sin, was condemned to die and those who hold that it is impossible to live forever (Ibn Ezra and others) and the punishment for eating the forbidden fruit must mean that he was condemned ...


4

The כלי יקר seems to discuss both your approaches - making it seem that Chazal didn't voice a [strong] opinion either way. He first mentions the popular approach that עִמָּהּ means that she intended him to share her fate. ותתן גם לאישה עמה. מלת עמה. פירשו המפרשים כדי שיהיה עמה תמיד ולא ישא אחרת כשתמות היא. ‏ He then tries 2 approaches to make the ...


4

Ralbag writes that the serpent is allegorical but Adam and Eve are real. His proof is that it would be very improper to say that a creature originally had the faculty of speech, but was then given a new nature. He understands Rambam as holding that Eve was allegorical as well, (an allegory for one of the human faculties) and he criticizes Rambam for ...


4

Your question already mentions Rambam's Hilchot Melachim 9:1 as a source that Adam had at least six negative commandments idolatry “blessing” (euphemistically) the Name (of G-d) murder illicit sexual relations thievery establishing a system of justice Radak derives each of these six commandments from the words in Bereshit 2:16 "And the LORD God commanded ...


4

Your understanding seems to follow, for the most part, the position of the Ramban as laid out in Sha'ar HaGemul, in the section on reward and Gan Eden. Here is a rough summary, although seeing these sources inside and in context gives a clearer picture. The Ramban explains that the primary reward is Olam Haba, and the reward that a person receives after ...


3

(Recognizing the origins and purposes of midrashim are imperative when attempting to utilize them for p'shat or to gain insight into 'the real world'.) Rashi on this verse is merely quoting the Midrash Rabba here (which, incidentally, has the words "ואת העופות", as does the Midrash Shemuel here). This, in turn, may have been the source for the ...


3

Putting some things together: According to the Nefesh HaChaim (1:6) and the Rambam (Moreh Nevochim 1:11), the result of the sin of eating from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil was some level of the internalization and assimilation of the drive for evil. R' Hirsch (Horeb ch. 68) explains in his discussion of the meaning of the laws of Kashrus that the ...


3

Seemingly from a few gemarahs there are two separate places Gan(earthly) and Eden(no eye has seen,spiritual).Rav Shmuel Bar Nachmani(Berachos 34b,Sanhedrin 99) said Eden(see Maharsha) no eye has seen,gan is where Adom was.There is another gemara in Eiruvin 19 which discuss the location of the entrance of gan Eden.So there is a split of a physical and ...


3

Bnei Yissaschar - Adar 7:9 mentions it in the name of Medrash Eliyahu - Section beginning Yalkut in the name of Rabbi Chaim Vital. This is also mentioned in the Shlah Hakodosh - Derush L'Parshas Zachor. אסתר גזרה תענית תקנה חטא אכילה. וגם בסעודה שעשתה החרידה לישראל וגרמה לתשובה תקנה חטא סעודת אחשורוש. וענין אכילה ועבודה זרה ענין נחש וסמאל, אכילה כמו ...


3

@Yishai in a comment posted a link to an answer to this question, but it's been a long time and he hasn't made it an answer, so I'm summarizing the answer myself. In Otzar HaYediyos, by Rav Yechiel Michel Stern, Rav of Ezras Torah, Volume 6, he writes two possible explanations. According to the Ramban, anything made of the four elements will decay ...


3

The statement in the Zohar in question, is the following passage in Tikkunei Zohar: תיקוני זוהר תקונא עשרין וחד ועשרין דף סב עמוד א ויניחהו בגן עדן לעבדה ולשמרה לעבדה בפקודין דעשה ולשמרה בפקודין דלא תעשה And he placed him in the Garden of Eden to work it and guard it. 'To work it': with positive mitsvot, 'and to guard it': with negative ...


3

The gemora chullin 60 a states that everything was created in its full form. "יב"ל כל מעשה בראשית בקומתן נבראו בדעתן נבראו בצביונם נבראו שנאמר (בראשית ב, א) ויכולו השמים והארץ וכל צבאם אל תקרי צבאם אלא צביונם" so we know everything existed. But we saw that before Adam and Chavah's sin, they and the snake coexisted just fine and that's even ...


2

Wikipedia states: Traditionally, the favoured derivation of the name "Eden" was from the Akkadian edinnu, derived from a Sumerian word meaning "plain" or "steppe". Eden is now believed to be more closely related to an Aramaic root word meaning "fruitful, well-watered." The Hebrew term is translated "pleasure" in Sarah's secret saying in Genesis 18:...


2

here is a quote on the nature of olam haba from the classic work chovos halevavos (gate 4 ch.4) Another reason (olam haba is not mentioned in the torah) is that the purpose of reward in Olam Haba is essentially clinging to G-d, and drawing near to His supernal light, as written "your righteousness will go before you, the glory of G-d will gather you ...


2

Sorry I don't have time to put together all the sources involved, but in general the basic confusion will come from the fact that there are two general views on the nature of Jewish eschatology, and you can read someone saying something about it and not quite know which model they are working with. One is generally attributed to the Rambam. Call it the ...


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