14

According to Volume 3 Issue 8 of "Halachicly Speaking" (page 3) it is permissible for two reasons: No one bows down to snowmen A snowman does not last for very long.


14

Nitei Gavriel Chanuka - page 306 mentions this in the name of Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin. Rabbi Genut at din.org.il also quotes Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin and says it is mentioned in Chapter 19:4 in the name of the Avodas Eved M'Lomza. YUTorah.org also gives the Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin as the source. This leads me to believe that there is no earlier ...


12

You seem to be asking two questions here: Is Lego© Mutar for an adult to use? How about a child? If it's only Mutar for a child, does that render it muktze for an adult? (Perhaps I'm reading into your question because of the availability of my answer, but either way it will address your question.) Hacham Ovadia Yosef, in Yechave Da'at (2:55), Addresses ...


11

I asked my local Orthodox rabbi: the (Chareidi) morah d'asrah of a mid-sized Orthodox shul in a North American city of about three million people. He prefers that I not specify his name here. He told me: It's crucial not to let your character do anything in the game that smacks of idolatry, such as praying to the virtual "gods" in the game. Playing the game ...


8

I would assume that there's no issue, as these crosses were only made for a design (in the game) and would fall under the heter of Shulchan Aruch YD 141:1, where he permits any figure presumed to have been made for merely aesthetic purposes. Even though the crosses on the gravestones are meant to be religious symbols, these particular crosses aren't ...


8

According to Shabbos 103a, you're chayiv for writing two letters becuase that's how they marked the boards of the Tabernacle. However, 103b specifies that just two lines would count too. He is guilty only on account of making a mark, because marks were made on each of the boards of the Tabernacle to know which was its companion. Therefore if one draws one ...


8

http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5764/vayeishev.html Children should be discouraged from playing dreidel games on Shabbos, even when playing with candy, etc.(Mishnah Berurah 322:22) A dreidel, however, is not muktzeh.(Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 5 Siman 22 Os 10)


8

The sefer Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchasah (16:33) paskens without reservation that dice games for recreation (not gambling) are fully permitted on Shabbos. No qualification is made for fear of writing by accident. A strict opinion (which not all hold like as Halachah) is brought by the Chayey Adam (Shabbos 11:38). He holds that any game which usually involves ...


7

The Rivevos Ephraim Chelek 8:564:1 was asked if one can blow bubbles from chewing gum(bazuka). He writes that making bubbles from soap was discussed in Shmiras Shabbas Kehilchasa perek 17:30 and says that one shouldn't make them. However, he writes that one shouldn't refrain a child from doing so,and the reason written in the name of Rav Shlomo Zalamn ...


7

The Debreciner in Shaalos U'Tshuvos Beer Moshe Chelek 3 Siman 123 says that the Minhag is to allow one to play Dreidel with their wife while she is a Niddah. However he recommends making a Heker* - either by each one using their own Draidel or any other type of Heker. If the entire family is playing and they are not sitting next to each other then you can ...


7

Our dreidel is of relatively recent vintage and there is no evidence that it existed prior to a few centuries ago. It stood for (before it's being adapted for chanukah) N = Nisht nothing to put into the pot G = Gantz Take all H = Halbe Take half Sh = Shtel Put coins into the pot One may perhaps still find deep meaning and significance in the dreidel ...


7

Dinonline Flying a Kite on shabbat answers, The actual flying of a kite itself does not involve a Shabbos prohibition [when there is an eruv]. However, this is not a recommended activity on Shabbos. Very often a kite has to be fixed, put together or reattached, all of which are prohibited on Shabbos. In addition the string often becomes knotted ...


6

There is no prohibition against owning idolatrous figures. However, there is a prohibition against gazing as such figures, which would in general prevent one from owning them. According to Shulchan Aruch (YD 141:1) it is permitted to gaze at an idolatrous figure that is not intended for the purpose of worship. (See Rama there who includes the cross as an ...


6

No. The miniature Sefer Torah in your link is not a Kosher Sefer Torah. As per Rabbi Doniel Neustadt a non Kosher Torah does not receive the same respect of a Kosher Torah. And it seems to me that he is talking about a Torah that can be Kosher and became non Kosher. You are questioning regarding a Tirah that was never Kosher and is impossible to become ...


5

Sh'miras Shabas K'hilchasah 3:78: It is forbidden to classify mixed flatware in order to organize each type into the compartment designated for it. Likewise, it's forbidden to take all the pieces of one type and dry them and then put them in their compartment. But it's permissible to put each piece of flatware into its compartment immediately after drying,...


5

The Yam Shel Sh'lomo is the one who, disagreeing with Tosafos, distinguishes between adults and children playing ball on Yom Tov http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14086&st=&pgnum=22&hilite=: אלא שחוק של ילדים שלא הגיעו לכלל חיוב הנח The YS"S can arguably be interpreted to refer to children below the age of chinuch. There is a Tosafos ...


5

I'd say, "mess away!" While relatively recent Hassidic sources have ascribed all sorts of significance to the dreidel, if I'm not mistaken the earliest sources simply discuss the practice of gambling on Chanukah. (Chavos Yair, if I'm not mistaken.) Dreidel seems to simply be a form of gambling that rabbis originally tolerated at best, that at some point ...


5

If it is being played for money there is an issue of stealing. The source for gambling in general is found in the Mishna in Sanhedrin (24b-25a) See this site: The Halachic Prohibitions Involved in Gambling The Mishnah in two separate places addresses the issue of the worth of a gambler's testimony in a Jewish court of law. In Tractate Rosh ...


5

THIS JUST IN: According to Orchos Shabbos chapter 9 siff 13, one must warn their chinuch aged child not to use building blocks such as Lego or the like to build a house or anything which has an Ohel of a tefach by a tefach if they are going to be using the space inside of it. And if they make this edifice it is not allowed to dismantle it. This is after ...


5

Regarding Shabbos issues: See here: שאלה: האם מותר לשחק בשבת פינג פונג שולחן או משחק גולות ? תשובה: מותר לשחק גולות בשבת בתוך הבית כיון שהקרקע מרוצפת. כמו כן ניתן להקל לשחק גם בחצר מרוצפת המצורפת לבית. וכן מותר לשחק פינג פונג שולחן בתוך הבית או מחוץ לבית כשיש עירוב. כיון שאין כאן חשש של "לאשויי גומות", דהיינו:ליישר את פני הקרקע). ...


5

Chess on Shabbat is technically allowed but many note it would be better for adults to spend the day in Torah learning. See for instance R Gil Student You would be wrong to take for granted the permissibility of playing chess on Shabbos. The issues raised include: making sounds, conducting business, non-Shabbos behavior. Apparently, on old chess ...


4

This short article addresses the general problem of bells on Shabbath, and yes they are prohibited for adults to use. However, this answer addresses toys that would otherwise be Muktzeh and explains that, if they are essentially children's toys, they are not Muktzeh for adults. I should add, though, that I've seen in the Sefer Shemirath Shabbath ...


4

Should be pretty much the same issue as playing Monopoly or Scrabble or whatnot with your wife. (Unless you argue that the traditional aspect to it makes it less problematic, which I don't particularly hear. Then again I'm not crazy about the whole dreidel thing anyhow, and will refer you to the responsum of Chasam Sofer lamenting that this holiday is "...


4

In the Dirshu Mishna Berura (based on the "Leshem") print, it is translated in a footnote as a game similar to "חמש אבנים" (lit. five stones) - when I was a kid it was called kuglach. It's similar to the game of jacks.


4

A seemingly very similar question is posed by Rabbi Gil Student on his website https://www.torahmusings.com/2017/05/video-game-idolatry based on a version of the game Zelda. He goes through several sources and comes out permitting worship in this game based on an extrapolation from the permissability to study religious worship that is no longer actively ...


4

See here an answer to that and similar questions by Rabbi Kaganoff. TL;DR According to the reasons we have applied so far, Zev may be able to keep his fancy carved chess set. No one worships the cross on the king, and one could, perhaps, argue that this is familiar enough that no one is led astray by these pieces. As mentioned above, it is meritorious ...


4

R' Tzvi Elimelech from Dinov (as well as the Chayey Adam) said that קרטן (cards) has the same Gematria as Satan and was the Klippa which the Greeks wanted to introduce to the Jews. Someone also pointed out that there are 36 cards which are the opposite side to the 36 Masechtos.


4

The Bnai Yissaschar's answer (original here in the note) is that the letters נ ג ה ש should properly be rearranged to spell גשנה (lit. to Goshen). This is a reference to Bereisheis 46:28 when Yehuda is sent ahead to Goshen to prepare for the stay of Yaakov and his children in Mitzrayim. This served as the first precedent and as a perpetual reminder of the ...


4

This is complete conjecture, but so it's the assumption that they really played dradel with letters that stood for something. Originally, the letters were נשג׳א as per maseches Avoda Zara 36b בית דין של חשמונאי גזרו ישראל הבא על עבודת כוכבים חייב משום נשג׳א. Rashi explains נ=נדה דרבנן. ש=שפחה. ג=גויה. א=אשת איש.


4

The Taamei Haminhagim (849) quotes the Bnei Yissas'char that cards represent the Greek's impure spirit resting on the 36 cards, which parallel the 36 tractates in Shas. It also said in the footnote that there was a Cherem against card-playing, with the explicit exception that it doesn't apply on Chanuka. And that exception was only to help quiet the evil ...


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