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7

I was talking to a friend of mine today about this question and he told me that recently he was in a Shul and no one wanted to Daven Musaf for the Amud. The Gabai has already Davened Shacharis and read the Kriyas HaTorah. So the Gabai made a loud announcement "Good Shabbos - Thanks for all of you joining with our Minyan. I am leaving now and will come back ...


7

This halacha is brought in Shulchan Aruch 53:16 Here are some clarifications: 1) A regular/permanent Shliach Tzibur does not need to refuse. (On the contrary, if a regular Shliach Tzibur refuses he shows that it is beneath his dignity to daven until the congregation pleads with him [see Beit Yosef and Shulchan Aruch Harav 53:19]) 2) If requested by an '...


6

The Mishna Berurah in siman 139 #16 makes a distinction between someone who started to finish the bracha by saying the name of Hashem in ברוך אתה ה׳ נותן התורה or not. If he did not say Hashem's name of the finishing bracha yet, he stops and says אשר בחר בנו. If he has already said that Shem Hashem, he finishes that bracha, the Torah is read, and ...


6

I would arrange for a chazan ahead of time, not right before davening. You probably know who the good chazanim are, so simply ask them a few days in advance and make a schedule (for yourself).


5

In Sefer Nishmat Avraham- Orach Chaim Siman 123 The Pardes Yosef offers a number of reasons why it is unnecessary to change the text of a prayer on his behalf. First: It is known that one's soul is considered to have "limbs" corresponding to the physical limbs of the body and, although he has lost one of his physical limbs, all of his spiritual "limbs" are ...


4

I have been a gabbai and the way I was trained was יעמוד בני יוסף without mentioning my own name. That is also the way that I have seen other gabbaim do it. When my sons who are gabbaim mention their children in a mi shebeirach (as an example) they also say 'Bni Ploni' or 'Biti Ploni' without using ben or bas and their names. When they call up their brother,...


3

One way to solve this would be to make sure somebody diligent [and somewhat aggressive] is given a Tikkun/Chumash which highlights these things, and have him correct you when needed. The Simanim Tikun comes to mind. If you want as few corrections as possible, highlight those few instances that are critical in the Chumash/Tikun you give him.


2

One thing you can do is ask the gabay rishon (chief gabay) if the person standing on the other side of the bima (table) can be a person of your choosing instead of or in addition to the usual gabay sheni (vice-gabay; or instead of no one) and pick someone who you know knows grammar and will correct you. I've done this one the rare occasion that I was reading ...


2

From practical experience the #1 problem is a tight circle which is not large enough for all the congregants. My Shul used to have this problem and has stopped having this problem when they expanded the circle size according to the size of the crowd. Some Shuls may not have the liberty of expanding the circle size due to the set up, and some just may have ...


2

I've seen the Gabbai Sheni say it instead, to avoid the distasteful move of calling out "God bless me!"


2

"סבירין" doesn't mean a variant and possibly correct opinion, but a mistaken one. In that sense it's like "sic" in English. R. Elya Bochur, Masores Hamasores: דע כי סבירין הוא ענין מחשבה כוזבת, ר"ל שאדם חושב ומדמה בלבו שהוא כן ואינו כן Know that סבירין means a false thought, meaning that a person thinks and imagines in his heart that it is so but it'...


1

According to my Rabbi, there is no obligation on a cohen, or anybody, to subserviently do any kibud (honor) asked of him. The rabbi did say that for the priestly blessing, if the cohanim are called, any cohen present is required to participate. He continued with stating that saying no at first would actually be proper ettiquete, as not to come of as ...


1

What I've always seen done was יעמוד בני יוסף בן שמעון where the Gabbai is Shimon.


1

The simple understanding of the Gemorah is that this should happen each and every time you are asked to lead davening. R. Aviner even suggests that if you have a chiyuv to daven, you should still refuse and let someone else do it, as an aliyah for the neshama. There is no burden on the Gabbai, as first of all, they should know the concept. Secondly, it ...


1

My son is gabbai and asked our Rav what to do. He calls me up and refers to me in the brocho afterwards as אבי מורי הכהן. In the brocho afterwards he refers to all other family members as he would for anyone else, i.e. אשתו, בניו, בנותיו etc and not אמי, אחי, אחיותי


1

I have been a gabbai and my sons are gabbaim. My sons refer to their brothers as 'Ploni ben Avi Mori' and their sons as 'Bni Ploni' without using their own names. I think that they would also refer to their wives as 'Ishti Plonis bas Ploni' and that is often how I would do it when I was gabbai. Note that we would first check with the rav of the shul to make ...


1

In my experience, the function of the one to two men (besides the reader and ole) at the bima in an Ashk'naz synagogue varies from synagogue to synagogue. In some, one calls olim and both check for accuracy in reading; in others, one calls olim and the other says some of the "mi sheberach" prayers; in others, there's but one worker standing there; in others, ...


1

Contrary to what the previous answer states, there can be a phonemic difference in many of these instances. If one pronounces an unaspirated /bet/ as a /waw/, for example, it might be mistaken for a conjunctive; if one usually differentiates between a /tav/ and a /sav/, the use of the former in a situation where the previous word sounds as though it ...


1

There's yet another instance where a Gabbai might speak during those forbidden times "for the sake of the tzibbur", and also FOR THE SAKE OF AN INDIVIDUAL! If the Gabbai finds someone speaking when forbidden, he is allowed to break that prohibition himself if he does so to stop that person from continuing his transgression. To stop an issur, one may trespass ...


1

The Shulchan Aruch in Orech Chaim (124:4) says that the kehillah should be quiet and have kavanah for each and every brochah of the shaliach tzibbur. Commenting on that si'if, the Mishnah Brurah notes (si'if katan 17) that one should not learn during the chazaras hashatz, even if one has the kavanah to say amein to each brochah. Why? Because amei haaretz ...


1

In between aliyos, the custom is to permit talking when important. During kaddish, chazaras hashatz, and during the actual kriyah, I don't think it's allowed.


1

In Aruch Hashulchan 124:12 he writes that a Rov who is asked a Halachik question during Chazoras Hashatz is permitted and obligated to answer and not wait until after Davening, because maybe the question is time sensitive. In Hilchos Krias HaTorah 146:2 he brings a disagreement of opinions and concludes that the Rov should evaluate the situation and if it ...


1

The Mechaber says that only Sichas Chulin is not allowed. It follows that if the Gabbai has to ask them at that time then it is permitted. Unlike during Krias HaTorah where speaking is forbidden even when not for Chulin. (See the Mishnah Brurah OC 125 sk 9 that says the Maharil wouldn't speak from the beginning of Kedusha until the end of HaKeil HaKadosh. ...


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