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7

Gemara Eiruvin 40B: Rav Yehuda would say shehecheyanu on a new gourd. A gourd would have the brachah of borei pri ha'adamah. Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 225:6 says that it should be a fruit that is new once (or twice - Rema) a year. Otherwise, the fruit's blessing is not a criteria. In fact, the Rema there allows a shehecheyanu blessing on a new vegetable ...


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This dried fruit may or may not be kosher. The reason has nothing to do with the bins it is stored in, however. Room temperature solids are not halachaly able to render one another non-kosher, so a non-kosher chocolate in a fig bin, as per your example, will not render the dried figs non-kosher. (Below 110° F, but if it's above 110° F at your local ...


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R Chaim Gross and R Shraga Simmons answer this question in their series on blessings (here) quoting Mishna Brura 210:1 [What is the blessing if] you ate a half-kezayit of crackers and a half-kezayit of apple? The proper bracha achrona is Borei Nefashot. The reason is because the apple cannot "go up" in status to combine and obligate Al HaMichya, but ...


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Reminds me of this (Sanhedrin 59b -- summarized and text below): Rabbi Shimeon ben Chalafta was walking on the road when lions met him and roared at him. Thereupon he quoted from Psalms: “The young lions roar for prey and to beg their food from HASHEM,” and two lumps of flesh descended from heaven. They ate one and left the other. This he brought to the ...


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I'd like to add that when speaking about fruits and vegetables specifically, generally the shops will have a certificate displayed, if you can't see it ask them to point it out to you. In supermarkets (especially in Chareidi areas) each type of produce usually has a hechsher printed next to the name display. If you do end up by mistake buying produce which ...


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Shops and manufacturers have kashrut certificates, just like restaurants. And packed products also have them. The large chain supermarkets are kosher, except for "Tiv Taam". That one exists specifically to be the "not-kosher" chain - that's what they're all about. As pointed out in a comment, there are also smaller Russian chains that operate on the same ...


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The Midrash (Shir HaShirim Rabbah, 4:11:2) actually makes the exact opposite inference from this passuk, prompting it to interpret it allegorically: דְּבַשׁ וְחָלָב תַּחַת לְשׁוֹנֵךְ, רַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה אָמַר אֵין מַשְׁקֶה סוֹרֵחַ יוֹתֵר מִמַּשְׁקֶה זֶה שֶׁתַּחַת הַלָּשׁוֹן, וְאַתְּ אוֹמֵר: דְּבַשׁ וְחָלָב תַּחַת לְשׁוֹנֵךְ, אֶלָּא אִם הֲלָכוֹת קֵהוֹת ...


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The challenge with strawberries is that many bugs are either too small to be seen to the untrained eye, or nest in the depths of the strawberry and only come out with soaking. Ruth Benchaya (in her French book Bedikat Tolaim, based on R Pesah Eliyahou Falk's sefer) explains the need for dish detergent (or soap, or a specific product like Teva's Sterily) ...


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On Shavous we are indeed celebrating the fruit of the tree. One of the opinions given by the Midrash of the Etz Hada'as was that it was Chitoh. The Shtei Halechem, the only korban made from wheat, was brought on Shavous, (the Ritvoh connects the two ideas) the day that the tree is judged. The judgement of the tree is strongly tied to the judgement of the ...


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This is the translation from Iyun Hadaf: He also rules that the oil ... ... that has already dripped into the trough is forbidden, but the oil ... ... that is still dripping from the 'Memel' (the heavy stone which presses the olives in the Ekel [Tiferes Yisrael]) and from between the 'Pitzim' (the planks which also squeeze out the oil from the olives) is ...


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