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18

Stuff that grows by itself on public property is exempt from the rules of orla. Source: Radvaz's commentary to Rambam, Maaser Sheni 10:6 (though it's pretty clear from the Rambam himself, 10:5).


11

Another answer (suggested here in the Sefer "Kerem Efraim") is that because the tree was created through a miracle, it was not obligated in Orlah. He brings support from the Radak (Malachim Beis 100:4) who writes that the oil that was miraculously created for the wife of Ovadia did not require Maaser to be separated from it. He explains that for the first ...


9

1) The Maharil explains that the apple is connected with "חקל תפוחים קדישין"; when Yaakov came to get the brochos from Yitzchok, he had the smell of an apple orchard upon his clothing. Besides for the Kabbilistic meanings, (according to one opinion) this episode happened on Rosh Hashana (GR”A O.C. 583:8) 2) There are three types of benefit derived from an ...


9

The Lubavicher Rabbi Zatzal explains as follows. The Jews were complaining about the lack of grain as Egypt had an abundance of grain. They also complained about figs, grapes and pomegranates, as they were given a promise of arriving in Eretz Yisrael which has those species. However regarding olives they had in the desert as you can see they had olive oil to ...


8

Taamei HaMinhagim 706 says it is done for Kabalistic reasons. In the notes, he mentions in the name of the Imrei Noam that the Gematria of the word "Tapuach" (the Hebrew word for apple) is the same as the Gematria of "S'e Akeida" - so we eat the apple to recall the Akeida (Binding of Isaac).


7

Great question! This is part of a major machlokes rishonim in maseches beitzah. The Ran in the beginning of the 3rd chapter says that really all melachos are allowed on a Biblical level, but the sages forbade melachos that are generally done for a long time, as harvesting is generally done on an entire field, not just what you need for that meal. ...


7

Raisins are grapes and are treated the same. That is, since you know the location of grapes in the order of precedence (one of the seven species and where grapes fall in that list) then the position of raisins is the same. I am showing the bracha acharona for raisins to show that they are treated exactly the same as grapes as far as being one of the seven ...


7

Gemara Eiruvin 40B: Rav Yehuda would say shehecheyanu on a new gourd. A gourd would have the brachah of borei pri ha'adamah. Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 225:6 says that it should be a fruit that is new once (or twice - Rema) a year. Otherwise, the fruit's blessing is not a criteria. In fact, the Rema there allows a shehecheyanu blessing on a new vegetable ...


6

You should CYLOR for a final ruling, but it seems (Shach and Taz to YD 84:13, Chochmat Adam 52:9, see also Rama OC 553:3 (however see Shu"t R Akiva Eiger 76)) there should be no problem blending the fruit as the intention is to prepare the food not to nullify the insects. Once the insects are cut up, they are nullified in the mixture (YD 101:6). ...


6

According to this article, we do :-) THE LAWS OF PESACH by Rav David Brofsky Shiur #2: The Laws of Pesach Defining Chametz (1) R. Yosef Karo (Shulchan Arukh 462:1-4) rules in accordance with the view of Rabbeinu Tam and the Rambam, who permit matzot made with fruit juice. The Rema, however, concludes that Ashkenazim should refrain from eating matza ...


6

Looks like it's a Haeitz. Sources: brochos.com which appears to be from the CRC.


6

Thanks to the Westmount Shul for this answer. Yes there is a difference, depending on how it grows. This is the way both Rabbi Bodner's & Rabbi Forst's Sefer rules also. Similarly, many "wild" plants, even though they produce fruit from year to year, are not considered trees. If only their roots remain and their trunk (or stem) dies out, they do ...


6

Jewish commenters do not believe the banana to be the Forbidden Fruit, yet mention of it is made: In the Middle Ages, the notion that the Forbidden Fruit is the banana appeared in several places. In 1277 Nathan HaMe’ati translated the Rambam’s medical work Pirkei Moshe (Aphorisms of Moses) from Arabic into Hebrew. In the section detailing the medicinal ...


6

OU's site (citing Rambam Berakhot 8:4) says that by default you should say shehakol, unless certain conditions are met: Shehakol is recited over the honey of dates. Nevertheless, if one crushes dates manually, removes the pits and makes them into a dough-like substance, the bracha is Borei pri ho’eitz beforehand and the bracha that includes the three ...


6

This dried fruit may or may not be kosher. The reason has nothing to do with the bins it is stored in, however. Room temperature solids are not halachaly able to render one another non-kosher, so a non-kosher chocolate in a fig bin, as per your example, will not render the dried figs non-kosher. (Below 110° F, but if it's above 110° F at your local ...


5

When one picks fruits owned by a Jew in Israel, he is allowed to snack on them (אכילת עראי) until they become designated for maaser (נקבע למעשר), or, if he is planning on selling them, until he finishes his work on the harvest (גמר מלאכה). After that, he cannot eat from them at all until properly tithing them. The most common ways of designating for maaser ...


5

There is specific symbolism in the apple. It also can't be discounted that apples are harvested around Rosh Hashana time so they are a readily available and relatively inexpensive fruit at that time.


5

As already stated, this site does not replace a Rabbi. But here are some sources. The Mishan in Mas. Orla (3:10) says: ספק העורלה--בארץ ישראל אסור, ובסוריה מותר; ובחוצה לארץ יורד ולוקח, ובלבד שלא יראנו לוקט. If in doubt, then fruit that could be Orla are forbidden in Eretz Yisrael, but permitted in the Diaspora. That's also have the Shulchan Aruch ...


5

Rabbi Ribiat discusses this in his sefer (The 39 Melochos), starting on page 333 (vol. 2). There are some fruits that are biblically forbidden, some that are rabbinically forbidden, and some that are allowed to be squeezed for juice. The biblically forbidden fruits are grapes and olives, because they are "distinguished especially for their juice." ...


5

The question was asked by the Satmer Rav quoted here. As cited there he answered The customs are indeed appropriate. On the day when trees are “judged,” we are interested in determining the success of the tree during the previous year. That is done by assessing what it has produced. On the other hand, when our focus is on the fruit and we want to assess ...


5

Here is an answer from Rabbi Eli Gersten from a previous issue of Jewish Action (OU): If your co-workers bought a fruit platter from a supermarket, you may partake of the fruit since you can assume the supermarket has a dedicated knife for fruit platters. Additionally, due to the sheer volume of fruit cut at one time in such a scenario, we regard ...


5

Mefarshim here: Q1) Shadal there (it's a really long piece, worth reading in its entirety) opposes your understanding, as he notes the opinion that animals were prohibited from eating fruit, and disagrees, noting: ‫ ואין להוציא מזה כדעת Grotius שנאסר פרי העץ לב״ח ‬ Ralbag also says clearly that fruit was included in "Yerek Esev", as do ...


4

It is only prohibited to cut down trees for no purpose, but what "purpose" includes is hard to define. Rambam Laws of Kings 6:9 deals with your case directly, however: כל אילן סרק מותר לקוץ אותו ואפילו אינו צריך לו. וכן אילן מאכל שהזקין ואינו עושה אלא דבר מועט שאינו ראוי לטרוח בו. מותר לקוץ אותו. It is permissible to cut down any non-fruit bearing ...


4

The honey has been around at least since the times of the Ge'onim; see Otzar HaGe'onim to Rosh HaShanah 32b (p. 53). Footnote ח (ad loc.) suggests that the Agudah had a version of a responsum from the Geonim which explicitly mentioned the custom of apples and honey. Either way, the custom definitely dates back at least to the days of the Agudah, who died in ...


4

two chiddushim of my own that I have not seen elsewhere. the pyre on the mizbeach is described as an apple. We are adjured not to offer up honey on the mizbeach because no man can stand it, but l’atid lavo we will be able to offer up honey on the mizbeach - so our tefillah is that the year should be sweet enough for us to do so and thus we dip the apple in ...


4

See this link to chabad who explains this well. http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1109802/jewish/Why-Eat-Carob-on-Tu-BShevat.htm There are more reasons,but have to find them.


4

Apple was the most widely known fruit. Think of the other fruits and vegetables that are called after the apple eg orange in Hebrew, potatoe in Hebrew, French and German, pineapple in English. See here "In Middle English and as late as 17c., it was a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts (e.g. O.E. fingeræppla "dates," lit. "finger-...


4

1.If one eats (regular uncooked) fruit in a meal one should make a Bracha Rishona on the fruit but no Bracha Achrona(S”A 177:2) 2.A cooked dish made from fruit and is served as part of the main meal doesn’t require it’s own Bracha. For example, fruit soup, fruit salad, fritter, fruits mixed with chicken or meat, and fruit blintzes don’t require a Bracha ...


4

Per Rabbi Aaron Tendler as long as you have no intention of using any juice that may squeeze out in the process of cutting, it is allowed.


4

Shulchan Aruch O.C. 212:1 כל שהוא עיקר ועמו טפילה (פירוש דבר בלתי נחשב) מברך על העיקר ופוטר את הטפילה בין מברכה שלפניה בין מברכה שלאחריה Anything which is primary and has a secondary with it, make the blessing on the primary and exempt the secondary, both in the blessing before and after. This applies to a food no matter how "special" it is, as the ...


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