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Note: My answer ended up vastly exceeding the maximum character limit for a post, so I have split it into two parts. The first part follows here, while the second part can be found in a separate post. Below I have tried to provide a survey of the different approaches of the rishonim to this contradiction. All the sources are from their own writings, not from ...


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Of course. God says through the prophet Isaiah: ‘Oseh shalom uvoreh ra’ [I make peace and create evil]; Ani HaShem ‘oseh chol elleh [I am the Lord who does all these things] [Isaiah 45:5,7] Our faith consists of believing that whatever God does that may appear "evil" to us ultimately has a "good" purpose.


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Note: This is a continuation of this answer which needed to be split into a separate post due to exceeding the maximum character length for a post. R. Isaac Ben Shehet R. Isaac Ben Sheshet was asked to explain the difference between Ra'avad's view and Ralbag's view. After providing his opinion as to the differences he also gave his own view, which seems to ...


3

G-d can do bad, but does not. As Ramchal explains in Derech Hashem, G-d is the ultimate source of good, and created the world to bestow goodness on others. Doing bad would be against G-d's purpose. G-d gave humans the choice between good and bad so that they can exercise free will and so-to-speak "earn" their reward. In other words, the opportunity ...


2

Rambam Hilchot Yesodei HaTorah 10:4: Concerning a prophet's prediction of calamities, such one would die, or such year would be visited by famine, or war, or matters similar to these, even though his words be not established, it is not considered contradictory to his prophecy. It shall not be said: "Behold, he spoke and it did not come to pass!" For, the ...


2

At the end of each day, make a cheshbon hanefesh (an accounting of the soul). Go through the day, looking at the decisions and emotional responses you had that day. Look at which middos (emotional capacities) tended to get triggered. Were the decisions from a place of anavah -- an honest assessment of self-worth, without needing to make the story about me? ...


1

While the Pharaoh that was punished was not the same one who initiated the policy, he did continue it. So once the Rambam proves that the original policy was done with free will, it is understood that the second Pharaoh also acted of his own free will.


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The Rambam is addressing two different questions (1) A general question. If the Torah said a group will do bad like it says the Egyptians will by enslaving the Jews how can it be is said of them that they had free will? (2) A more specific question. How can you say Pharaoh had free will when the Torah explicitly says Hashem will harden his heart? He is ...


1

The plagues were never meant to pressure Pharaoh. The purpose of the plagues was to demonstrate to the Egyptians, the Israelites and for history that Hashem has total control over the world. This is stated many times in the text: Shemos 7:17: כֹּ֚ה אָמַ֣ר יְהוָ֔ה בְּזֹ֣את תֵּדַ֔ע כִּ֖י אֲנִ֣י יְהוָ֑ה הִנֵּ֨ה אָנֹכִ֜י מַכֶּ֣ה ׀ בַּמַּטֶּ֣ה אֲשֶׁר־...


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