19

The Gemara in Berachos 10a says that (at the advice of his wife Beruriah) Rebbi Meir prayed for neighbors of his to become religious, and the Gemara seems to approve of this. This is also implied by Sotah 14a, where Moshe is said to daven for the wicked to return, as well as in Taanis 23b, where Abba Chilkiyah says that his wife is more righteous because she ...


9

is it ok?!? ITS A TREMENDOUS MITZVAH! we say every day "hashiveinu avinu lesorasecha" 3x a day. Sefardi siddurim within this bracha have a place to add the name of someone who needs to repent and a small bakasha. Also, the chazon ish has a nusach for a teffilah which deals with the issue of "hakol byedei shaymayim chutz m'yiras shamayim". The Chazon Ish's ...


9

The gemara in Moed Kattan 18b would seem to advise against it: כי הא דרבא שמעיה לההוא גברא דבעי רחמי ואמר תזדמן לי פלניתא א"ל לא תיבעי רחמי הכי אי חזיא לך לא אזלא מינך ואי לא כפרת בה' בתר הכי שמעיה דקאמר או איהו לימות מקמה או איהי תמות מקמיה א"ל לאו אמינא לך לא תיבעי עלה דמילתא This is like this incident, in which Rava heard a certain man asking ...


7

Note: My answer ended up vastly exceeding the maximum character limit for a post, so I have split it into two parts. The first part follows here, while the second part can be found in a separate post. Below I have tried to provide a survey of the different approaches of the rishonim to this contradiction. All the sources are from their own writings, not from ...


7

Avot 3:19 says: "Rabbi Akiva said: All is foreseen, but freedom of choice is given. The world is judged in goodness, yet all is proportioned to one's work." This is a classic conundrum: if we have free will then how can all be foreseen, and if all is foreseen how can we have free will? But, somehow, both statements are true; God, not being limited in any ...


6

The Ramchal in Da'as Tevunos in the section בריאת הרע וגדריו, starting with siman 96 and particularly in siman 114 and 118, explains how demons came into existence. 114: כשאנו אומרים שהקב"ה ברא העולם הזה, ודאי נבין בתחילה בריאת הכלל, ואחר כך הפרטים, פירוש, בתחילה הטבע עצמו, ואחר כך אישיו. והנה כשרצה האדון ב"ה לחדש הטבע בטוב ורע, הנה ודאי הוא שבאה השפעה ...


5

מעיד אני עלי את השמים ואת הארץ, בין ישראל בין עכו״ם, בין איש בין אשה, בין עבד ובין שפחה הכל לפי מעשה שהוא עושה - כך רוח הקודש שורה עליו. (Seder Eliyahu Raba 9). And Avoda Zara 3a (Rabbi Meir). See also Rambam, end of Shmita ve-Yovel.


4

The Ramchal in Da'as Tevunos Chelek Beis Simanim 29 - 35 deals with the issue of angels making mistakes. I am not going to copy it here because it is lengthy. Essentially, his idea is that angels are given two things - their mission and their awareness. Sometimes their mission is very specific and detailed, and sometimes it is given more vaguely. If an ...


4

Rabbe'inu Baḥya (Ḥovot HaLevavot, Sha'ar HaBitaḥon, Chapter 4, s.v. וכן כשיבקש) states, based on the Talmud Bavli (Bava Bathra 119B among others), that HaShem arranges for good deeds to be fulfilled by the worthy and unfortunate deeds to be fulfilled by the sinful (מגלגלין זכות על ידי זכאי וחובה על ידי חייב). According to this Hashqafah (outlook/philosophy),...


4

Free will is premised on the existence of a domain which need not submit to Hashem's will. As the Ramchal writes in the Daas Tevunos, the existence of this domain, while requisite for receiving reward for what we accomplish in this world, at some point will disappear, since ultimately Hashem's will is to reveal his oneness, and the existence of this domain ...


4

Yehuda Shirpin points out multiple sources where angels did indeed make a mistake - Chagigah 15a where Metatron was whipped Rashi (Bereishis 19:22) where the Angels destroying Sedom are handicapped by saying "we" will destroy the city, and continues: An angel is not merely a robot; it is something like a robot with its own intelligence. Perhaps the ...


4

When a person did lose his free choice, we say that he became Shote, loosely linked to the inaccurate term of "crazy" or insane. He is categorized as a child regarding responsibility and this state is often reversed to sanity. For instance mishna Gittin 2.6: קיבל הקטן והגדיל, חירש ונתפקח, סומא ונתפתח, שוטה ונשתפה, נוכרי ונתגייר--פסול. אבל פיקח ונתחרש ...


4

Rabbi Shafier of The Shmuz asks this question in one of the pieces from Parshas Mishpatim. The gist of his answer (although I'd recommend reading it directly, it's not too long of an article) is a two step answer: 1) all results come about from Hashem, even though a person puts intent into their actions, ultimately no results would come about from the ...


4

הוריות יג. כהן קודם ללוי לוי לישראל ישראל לממזר וממזר לנתין ונתין לגר וגר לעבד משוחרר אימתי בזמן שכולם שוים אבל אם היה ממזר תלמיד חכם וכהן גדול עם הארץ ממזר תלמיד חכם קודם לכהן גדול עם הארץ Horiyos 13a: Kohen before a levi. Levi before a yisroel. Yisroel before a mamzer. Mamzer before a nasin [Gibeonite]. Nasin before a convert. Convert before a freed slave. ...


4

Bava Kama 38a ולא והתניא ר"מ אומר מנין שאפילו נכרי ועוסק בתורה שהוא ככהן גדול ת"ל (ויקרא יח, ה) אשר יעשה אותם האדם וחי בהם כהנים ולוים וישראלים לא נאמר אלא אדם הא למדת שאפילו נכרי ועוסק בתורה הרי הוא ככהן גדול The Gemara asks: But do they not receive reward for fulfilling those mitzvot? But isn’t it taught in a baraita that Rabbi Meir says: From ...


4

Of course. God says through the prophet Isaiah: ‘Oseh shalom uvoreh ra’ [I make peace and create evil]; Ani HaShem ‘oseh chol elleh [I am the Lord who does all these things] [Isaiah 45:5,7] Our faith consists of believing that whatever God does that may appear "evil" to us ultimately has a "good" purpose.


3

Yes, it is a chidush. Many people use the escape route, to avoid taking the responsibility of their actions. For example, someone might say, "I was very mean to my wife, but I couldn't help it, because G-d knows what I will do and He didn't stop me, so it's not my fault, and He allowed me to do it." However, we must realize that even though G-d knows what ...


3

This seems to parallel לא יאונה לצדיק כל און - No wrong shall be caused for the righteous, certainly according to Rashi (there on the verse and other places) that this applies to all sin, but even according to Tosfos that this only applies to food or things which are degrading for the Tzaddik, it is certainly appropriate to ask for that protection. Note in ...


3

You may be "over analyzing" Rashi"s Kal Vachomer, here. First, translate what Rashi said in the context of the word he is explaining as well as the entire verse. Rashi is explaining the word, "lehakdisheini" - "To sanctify me". In other words, Moshe hit the rock. God said to Moshe SPEAK to the rock. So, Moshe did NOT do God's will, and therefore did not ...


3

There's a responsa quoted in Otzar Hageonim (vol. 1 pg. 6) about praying to angels, where he quotes several Gemaras and Midrashim that angels have free will. Several commentators, among them Rashi (19:22), discuss this in the story of Sedom where Chazal indicate that the angels may have sinned at various points. Ohr Hachayim there (19:20) takes this a step ...


3

Note: This is a continuation of this answer which needed to be split into a separate post due to exceeding the maximum character length for a post. R. Isaac Ben Shehet R. Isaac Ben Sheshet was asked to explain the difference between Ra'avad's view and Ralbag's view. After providing his opinion as to the differences he also gave his own view, which seems to ...


3

Note: source is in kabbalah a lot earlier then the alshich. True, it is unbalanced in that sense. but there are many many things to say about this issue, here are some pointers: We (at least it's in my machzor) say on rosh hashana "ata yodeah yitzram ve'atah (possibly "ki" ) yotzram"(אתה יודע יצרם ואתה יוצרם) meaning god created us with a disadvantage and ...


3

Doesn't this require that God intervene in nature in a very obvious way on a regular basis? The answer to this question is yes Originally, miracles occurred on a regular basis. We see this from the list of miracles that existed during the first temple. Additionally, the prophets were active and were able to perform miracles. We also see that the Bnai ...


3

We find several examples of future choices being foretold. Here are some of them. The Gemara in Yoma 38b says: דף לח - ב. (אמר) ר' חייא בר אבא א''ר יוחנן ראה הקדוש ברוך הוא שצדיקים מועטין עמד ושתלן בכל דור ודור שנא' {שמואל א ב-ח} כי לה' מצוקי ארץ וישת עליהם תבל Rav Chiya bar Abba said in the name of Rebbi Yochanan, Hakadosh Baruch Hu saw that ...


3

The Migdol Dovid writes that we are davening that Hashem remove the practical obstacles to doing teshuva - once we have the intellectual desire to do teshuva, Hashem can assist us to actualize our intellectual decision. This is not unlike the idea of הבא ליטהר מסייעין אותו (Yoma 38b) - one who comes to purify himself receives [divine] assistance. Rabbeinu ...


3

The Mishna in Avot (4:17) states: יפה שעה אחת בתשובה ומעשים טובים בעולם הזה מכל חיי העולם הבא One minute of correcting one's ways and performing good deeds in this era, is better than all of life in the future era. R. Zaddok HaKohen of Lublin explains that the former is so valuable, since only it allows for free-will. מחשבות חרוץ אות ז ...


3

Not so much an answer as much as why I think it's impossible to give you one: Free Will lives in a region between algorithm and randomness. (See Metahalakhah, by R/Dr Moshe Koppel, ch. 2-3, for an actual information theory treatment of this topic.) If our decisions were an algorithm, then we'd be robots, with a given history of inputs causing our decisions ...


3

The point was that Hashem sent the plagues so that Pharoah would see that Hashem wanted to indicate to him that he was supposed to send them out. The Egyptians could have rebelled and appointed a new king in order to send them out. Once Pharoah saw that the oppression of the Hebrews led to punishment he could have decided to do the right thing. There are ...


3

G-d can do bad, but does not. As Ramchal explains in Derech Hashem, G-d is the ultimate source of good, and created the world to bestow goodness on others. Doing bad would be against G-d's purpose. G-d gave humans the choice between good and bad so that they can exercise free will and so-to-speak "earn" their reward. In other words, the opportunity ...


2

1, 2) Or Hachayim to 10:7 explains that their hearts were still hard, and they wanted to just allow the Jews to take a short trip for a few days to serve their God in a way that they would certainly return. In his understanding, the fact that they thought that simply letting them have their way for a 3 day vacation would fix everything is the part that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible