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5

Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 196:1 says that you shouldn't: אבל [צ"ל אכל] דבר איסור אף על פי שאינו אלא מדרבנן אין מזמנין עליו ואין מברכין עליו לא בתחלה ולא בסוף: One who ate a forbidden food, even if it's forbidden only Rabbinically, cannot be included in a mezuman [a quorum for Grace After Meals], and does not recite a blessing before or after eating ...


4

According to Wiktionary: In Yiddish, פּאַרעוו‎ (parev) is the predicative form and פּאַרעווע‎ (pareve) the attributive form of the adjective. Some speakers familiar with Yiddish use this distribution in English as well, e.g. My mom made a pareve casserole but This casserole is parev.


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In a lengthy comment on this Talmudic passage in Ben Yehoyada, R. Joseph Hayyim of Baghdad addresses this question. He begins with a different question: how is it possible that R. Nachman was unaware of the law that one must not talk while eating? Furthermore, how could R. Yitzchak respond? The very statement he was quoting forbids making the statement! ...


2

Most likely due to the fact that first Rav Yitzchak quoted Rav Yochonan when he told told Rav Nachman that one should not talk when eating. Then when he finished eating, he continued to quote Rav Yochanan on another matter (Yaakov lo mes). This is not unusual in shas to string quotes of an amorah together. There are many examples in shas, here is one - ...


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According to Wiktionary: In Yiddish, פּאַרעוו‎ (parev) is the predicative form and פּאַרעווע‎ (pareve) the attributive form of the adjective. Some speakers familiar with Yiddish use this distribution in English as well, e.g. My mom made a pareve casserole but This casserole is parev.


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Keep in mind that there are several different categories of non-kosher food. Something like non-kosher beef is a real problem. Similarly, Chometz on Pesach, Yayin Nesech (wine used in idol worship) and meat with milk. On the other hand, food that is not certified as kosher may indeed be kosher or non-kosher in a (relatively) minor way. If you eat non-kosher ...


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No. The Shulchan Aruch, Orach Hayyim 196:1, says: If one ate a forbidden item (even it is forbidden only by the sages), one cannot make a zimun on it or say a blessing on it, neither before or after it.


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Having worked as a mashgiach for 4 years or so now, in a variety of restaurants and agencies, I can say that it varies somewhat. Often, the mashgiach is tasked with working the cash register or answering the phone, because most mashgichim are native speakers of English. I think this is not ideal if the mashgiach is the only cashier at a given time, as he ...


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