21

Talmud Sukkah 53A: חסידים ואנשי מעשה כו': ת"ר יש מהן אומרים אשרי ילדותנו שלא ביישה את זקנותנו אלו חסידים ואנשי מעשה ויש מהן אומרים אשרי זקנותנו שכפרה את ילדותנו אלו בעלי תשובה אלו ואלו אומרים אשרי מי שלא חטא ומי שחטא ישוב וימחול לו The mishna continues: The pious and the men of action would dance before the people who attended the celebration. The ...


16

Like many things in life, this will obviously depend on the specific situation. For example, if the relevant people understand your lifestyle and why you would be sensitive to this issue before it came up would be a very different question than if they are militantly opposed to your zealous bigotry. I had a close relative marry a non-Jew, and I actually ...


15

Bava Batra (16b) records a dispute (found earlier in Tosefta Kiddushin (5:17 in R. Lieberman's edition) regarding the interpretation of Genesis (24:1) which states that God blessed Abraham "bakol" (literally: with everything): Rabbi Meir says: The blessing is that he did not have a daughter. Rabbi Yehuda says: On the contrary, the blessing was that he had a ...


15

What happened happened and the Torah approach is not to dwell on it, but rather focus on improving going forward. Regarding sins from the past, the Rambam writes (Hilchot Teshuva 1:3) Teshuvah [repentance] atones for all sins. Even a person who was wicked his whole life and repented in his final moments will not be reminded of any aspect of his ...


14

Tosfos in Bava Basra 141a writes: בת היה לו ובכל שמה. וא"ת ולמה לא השיאה ליצחק למ"ד בפרק ארבע מיתות (סנהדרין דף נח:) דבן נח מותר באחותו וי"ל דשמא קטנה היתה ולא רצה עדיין להשיאה ליצחק אי נמי מהגר היתה לו ולא משרה ולכך לא רצה להשיאה ליצחק Tosfos asks, if Avraham Avinu had a daughter why didn't Yitzchak marry her, according to the opinion that a ben ...


14

In the Tzavaos of Rabbi Yehuda HaChasid #25 seen here he says two brothers should not marry two sisters. See note #37 (#32 in the linked edition) from Rabbi Reuven Margolis quoting the Noda Biyehuda Even HaEzer 79 who brings cases in the gemara where we see this was not something they adhered to. EDIT: To clarify the issue and for those who don't know, ...


13

Among those Rabbis that I know, if/when they are approached by someone who wasn't raised as a Jew but has a Jewish maternal grandparent, they welcome them with open arms as Jews, albeit Jews who have been estranged from their own religion. I have known this to have occurred on multiple occasions (although I was never personally involved in any). It may be ...


13

Ramban there offers a couple of reasons: Leah's eyes were weak (29:17), so the sun would be harmful to her. Precisely because she was older, so there was more of a concern that the shepherds would take inappropriate liberties with her.


12

Unless there were extenuating circumstances at play, I think someone has gone too far here. Maimonides Laws of the Rebel, 5:11: הגר אסור לקלל אביו הגוי, ולהכותו ולבזהו--כדי שלא יאמרו, באו מקדושה חמורה לקדושה קלה, שהרי זה מבזה אביו; ונוהג בו, מקצת כבוד. The convert may not curse, strike, or demean his non-Jewish father; as people would say this guy has ...


11

1) Netziv (Vayikra 10:4) says: אל מישאל ואל אלצפן בני עזיאל דד אהרן – כבר נדרש בת״כ למאי כתיב דד אהרן. ולפי הפשט משמעות דד כמו ידידות מלשון כי טובים דדיך. ובא לפרש למה קרא לבני עוזיאל יותר מבני יצהר וכדומה. אלא משום שידע משה שיש מהם מקנאים לאהרן. וכבודו והיו נראים בזה כשמחים לאידו. ע״כ קרא לבני עוזיאל שידע שהוא אוהב וריע ומצטער בצערו. וכן היו בניו ענוים ...


11

After the Return by Rabbis Mordechai Becher and Moshe Newman, a guidebook for baalei t'shuva, covers this. To summarize the discussion in Chapter 6: You should offer to do (and fund) the shopping to avoid placing an extra burden on them. The best case is that they agree to kasher the kitchen, and he says that some parents are actually willing to do that ...


11

The Midrash (Megillah 17a) says Yaakov spent 2 years tarrying on his way back from Lavan (18 months in Sukkot and 6 months in Beit-El). So there's no way Rachel was already pregnant when she saw her father. Even from the verses, what you describe as "just a few chapters later" doesn't seem to have been so quick. In 33:17-18 we have Yaakov arriving in two ...


10

No, the rabbi wouldn't find it strange. & Yes, he would accepted you at the spot as 100% jewish. And I can tell you from my own personal experience they would be even very happy!


9

I was at the bar mitzvah of the adopted son of Rabbi Yitzchok Breitowitz, shlita. At the bar mitzvah, the rabbi explained that his son had been converted conditionally as a small child by putting him in a mikvah and by the parents committing themselves to raise him as a Jew. But since the child cannot yet speak for himself (until he reaches 13 -- or 12 for ...


9

Mother (B) Mother's mother (R) Mother's mother's... mother (R) Mother's father's mother (R) Father's mother (R) Father's mother's... mother (R) Father's father's mother (R) Father's wife (B) Father's father's wife (R) Father's father's... father's wife (R) Mother's father's wife (R) Father's mother's father's wife (R; some permit) Father's paternal brother's ...


9

Shulchan Aruch EH 15:5 states: אשת אביו אסורה לו מן התורה, בין שהיא אשתו מן הנשואין בין מן האירוסין, בין בחיי אביו בין כשמת אביו או גירשה.‏ The wife of one's father is forbidden to him biblically, whether she was his wife from nissu'in or erusin, whether one's father is alive or not or [even if] he divorced her.


9

The basic rule is there is no allowance to speak lashon hara to relatives. See for instance Hilchos Lashon Hara (Klal 8, Sif 10). In fact, the Chafetz Chaim there advises against telling your wife all the ways you were mistreated during the day because it will cause her to lose respect for you too! The Chafetz Chaim in Hilchos Lashon Hara (Klal 6, Sif 4) ...


9

Yes they are allowed to marry. The problems are discussed here. I personally know of such couples (and also brother-sister, sister-brother cross-over) among the most ultra-orthodox chasidim.


9

The Torah clearly states that one may not marry one's wife's sister, as long as one's wife is alive. This is true whether you are still married to your first wife or not. I.e. whether she is a rival or not. (In the Torah, all one's current wives are labeled "Rival Wives".) Once she dies, she is no longer a Rival Wife, and you can marry her sister. This is ...


8

Your children are totally normal, non-Kohanim; no special honors, no special obligations either. Kohanic status is strictly patrilineal. The one exception is that if your first child was a boy, even if born naturally (i.e. not C-section), he would not require a Pidyon HaBen ceremony; as the Torah speaks of "first issue of the mother's womb", a Pidyon is ...


8

The reality is that for many Baalei Teshuva they simply won't have the knowledge to really dynamically adapt to such a situation. Things like this can raise situations that can absorb the greatest Rabbis in discussions about exactly what to allow and what not, and anyone facing this situation for real should discuss the expected situation in advance with ...


8

Avunculate marriage is marriage between an uncle and a niece or between an aunt and a nephew. The latter is Biblically forbidden (Leviticus 18:12-3). The former, however, is not, and the Talmud actually encourages it (Yevamot 62b-63a). Interestingly, R. Saul Lieberman z"l contends that the Talmudic encouragement for marrying one's niece, was specifically ...


8

Kiddushin 69a (Art Scroll Kiddushin 69a4), The end of the first mishna chapter 4 Asarah Yochasin. There are ten classes of geneology, this is one of them. These are shetukim: Anyone who knows the identity of his mother, but does not know the identity of his father 9 Note 9: Shetuki literally means "the quieted one" (from the root שתק, quiet). [A ...


8

According to Bamidbar Rabba 15 19, Eldad was Alidad ben Kislon and Meidad was Kemuel ben Shaftan. That would put Eldad as the Nasi of Binyamin and Meidad as the Nasi of Ephraim as found in Parshas Masei 34 vs 21 and 24. The idea that they were related to Moshe is found in Targum Yonasan Bamidbar 11 26. There we see that when Amram divorced Yocheved she had ...


8

Nit'ei Gavri'el does indeed record the attestation of feasting together with one's family in a number of sources (in Purim 71:4). They are not necessarily attesting the purpose of perpetuation Rashi was explaining, but several are based on Rashi's comments on Ester, M'gila, and Hapardes (Purim 31) no less. Basically, regarding the obligation to feast, it ...


8

There is nothing that does not come from G-d - even evil has a kernel of good. This is why evil is referred to as a klipah, a shell - it separates holiness from G-d but the holiness is still there, buried within. While it is not advisable to deliberately pursue a sinful life for the sake of "redeeming" it later, once it is already done, there is always a ...


7

See the commentary of the Ibn Ezra on Esther 8:1 (page 30 in the linked document) where he says that Mordechai was Esther's uncle.


7

R' Rachmiel Zelcer in סימן יב of his נר למאה on פורים cites the צפנת פענח on מסכת סופרים: The name of Agag, king of Amalek, was in fact Hamdata. And "Agag" is actually the title for kings of Amalek. So why does the מגילה call Haman an Agagite (instead of Amalekite)? Since Sanherib mixed up all the nations, we can't be certain that any individual is in fact ...


7

The Chochmas Adam (Issur v'Heter, 89:7) decries the practice of going to a gravesite and unburdening oneself to the deceased by telling them about one's problems.1: איסור דורש אל המתים זה שמרעיב עצמו ולן בבית הקברות כדי שתשרה עליו רוח הטומאה (סימן קע"ט סעיף י"ג) ואותן נשים וכן עמי הארצות שהולכין על קברי מתים וכאילו מדברים עם המתים ואומרים להם צרותיהם קרוב ...


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