24

It certainly doesn't mean electricity! The truth is, we don't really know what it means. And whatever it is, studying it is dangerous! Some of you may recall the story in BT Hagiga 13a, where a child is studying Ezekiel, ponders over the meaning of hashmal, and was consumed by fire. You have been warned... From the context, it appears to be some kind of ...


10

Rashi implies that the practice was to salt the infant to strengthen its flesh. (See also Malbim.) According to Abarbanel, the salt was added in the water to strengthen the infant's body, but also (it seems) for extra hydration. Apparently, salting newborns was an ancient practice that was also recommended by Soranus of Ephesus. From here: Soranus ...


9

The commentary M'tzudas Tziyon says it means a clear, smokeless fire. The commentary Mahari [=R. Yosef] Kara says it means a tongue of fire.


7

There are numerous prophecies about the Messianic era and they are generally viewed together as a "single package". As such, Orthodox Judaism is hesitant to declare a single prophecy of that package fulfilled in case there is a snag in the fulfillment of the other and it turns out that that declaration was in error. The more Zionist groups of Orthodoxy will ...


6

While the verse cited does predict a return of the Jews to the land of Israel it also includes details which have not yet been realized. The return of large numbers of Jews to Israel and an independent Jewish state are a necessary condition for the fulfillment of this prophecy (and others) but not a sufficient condition for its fulfillment. That this ...


6

Tammuz originated as a Sumerian shepherd god. In Babylonia, the month Tammuz was established in honor of the eponymous god Tammuz, who originated as a Sumerian shepherd-god, The idolatrous ritual of mourning corresponded with the changing of the seasons. the Babylonians marked the decline in daylight hours and the onset of killing summer heat and drought ...


5

It means you weren't salted. It seems to be some sort of old tradition that somehow treating newborns with salt (externally, by rubbing, I suppose) was good for the flesh of the child. See Rashi there. He explains that it "hardens" the flesh. Targum doesn't seem to think anything of it and "translates" it straight as salting (it's the same word in Aramaic, ...


5

Targum on that passuk spells out the numbers and Rashi quotes him. Each chaya has 64 wings. They each have four partzuphim, each partzuph has four faces and each face has four wings. 4 X 4 x 4=64. Then, being that he saw 4 chayos turns out he saw 256 wings.


5

Mamzerut is not a punishment for the deed, the punishment ends with the death of the parents, if it applies. Mamzerut is a situation, a מציאות . I think of it as a genetic disease, or a social/geographical condition in which the child is born because of the parents . I shall add some mekorot later.


5

Remember that man for good and Chanania ben Chizkia is his name for if not for him the seffer Yechezkel would have been hidden, for his words contradict the Torah. What did he do, he brought three hundred barrels of oil and sat in the upper dwelling and expounded. Shabbos 13b. Just so happens that the things that Yechezkel said which contradicted the Torah ...


4

According to מעדני מלכים no. 187, citing the כסף משנה to Rambam, Hilchot Avel 2:1 that only things that are "מפורש בתורה ממש," only things that are absolutely explicit in the Torah are considered to be mitzvos on the Biblical level; if it's not absolutely clear, then it is considered to be "מדברי סופרים." He doesn't consider "שארו" to be absolutely explicit,...


4

It would seem that the description of such a child as “rebellious” and “transgressor” is not in reference to the parents' wrongful conduct at the time of intercourse, but rather to the child's own predisposition to future sin as a result of this. The Zohar (See Zohar II, 204b; III, 80-82, explained in the end of the 2nd chapter of Tanya) writes that during ...


4

The Ohr Chaim on Bamidbar 3:45 writes that the firstborn will serve in the Third Temple. שאמרו ז"ל עתידה עבודה שתחזור לבכורות R' Yonathan Eybeschutz writes in Ahavat Yonatan on the haftorah for Emor, that in the future, there will be atonement for the sin of the golden calf, and thus the firstborn will return to temple service. I've seen many who are ...


4

Rash"i and his younger contemporary, Mahar"i Kara, as well as M'tzudas Tziyun, and Rada"k identify it as afarsimon extract. This is attributed to the identification of the substance by Yosifon. Some of the commentators also add that these trees were indigenous to Y'richo and their fragrance gave the city its name. Most of that chapter associates trees or ...


3

The Idea in Brief The plain reading and normal reading of Scripture indicates that Nebuchadnezzar would destroy the sister cities of Tyre “on the mainland,” which would result in the dissolution of the fame and fortune of the ISLAND city state from that point forward. Centuries later “they” (someone indicated in the text in contradistinction to ...


3

Rashi ad loc. says: ראיתי בספר יוסף הכהן עץ אפרסמון הוא פנג והיו מצויין ביריחו ועל שם ריח הטוב נקראת יריחו באלסמ"א בלע"ז:‏ I saw in the book of Joseph the Kohen that the afarsimon tree is Pannag, and they were found in Jericho. And, due to its good smell, it's called "Jericho Balsam"1 in a foreign language. My translation The Jewish ...


3

I understand the Rambam below is referring to your chapter (so no it is referring to the one not yet built (it shloud be speedily rebuilt) The rambam  » Mishneh Torah» Sefer Avodah » Beit Habechirah »  1 » 4 The [design of the] structure built by [King] Solomon is described explicitly in [the Book of] Kings. [In contrast, the design of] the Messianic ...


3

Is this a scientific question or a halachik one? Just because salting a newborn was a good way to treat them, doesn't mean it's the only good way. If we have better ways of treating their skin we use them. To say that the prophet deems that this is the only acceptable way to treat them requires more than just a description of good care. Today we have much ...


3

The Abarbanel discusses this issue in his commentary on Yechezkel 26:1: השאלה השישית בכפל המאמרים שאמר הנביא על מפלת צור כי אחרי שאמר ושחתו חומות צור והרסו מגדליה וסחתי עפרה ממנה ונתתי אותה לצחיח סלע משטח חרמים תהיה בתוך הים מה צורך לומר שנית בתתי אותה עיר נחרבת כערים אשר לי נושבו בהעלות עליך את תהום וכסוך המים הרבים וכן שאר הפסוקים, ומכלל זה שבא נבואה ...


3

There are two answers, one from the main translation (as explained by Rashi) and one that I came up with based on logic. Yechezkel 44:22 And neither a widow nor a divorced woman may they take for wives, but they shall take virgins from the descendants of the House of Israel; also the widow who is only a widow, some of the priests may marry. RASHI ...


2

Both Abravanel to Yehezkel 44:3 (see also 46:18) & the Radak to 44:3 states that the Nasi is Melech HaMoshiach.


2

Rav Yaakov Kamenetzky (Emmes leYa'akov Parshas Bo, page רעא of the new edition) discusses this question. He writes (and if I remember well there is a Malbim who writes so too) that Yechezkel's Beth Hamikdash was meant to be final one. If the Jewish people during the Babilonian exile would have lived up to the level G'd wanted them to, they indeed would have ...


2

See Did the Jews Disregard Ezekiel's Prophecy of the Temple and also Why Haven't the Jews Rebuilt the Temple Yet?. Rabbi Yehuda Shurpin in these two articles states that the Second Temple was not modeled after Ezekiel's temple (reason given) and that only in the Messianic age will it be built exactly as he described it.


2

There is no 3rd Temple in a religious sense. It's a rebuilding of the second. The holiness of the second Temple is "sanctified for its time, and sanctified through to the future to come" -- ie all eternity. Just as we don't consider Herod's rebuilding and enhancement of the Second Temple to be a 3rd Temple, technically the messianic one will be a rebuilding ...


2

Babylon defeated Egypt shortly after laying waste to Jerusalem. That is, the Babylonians first routed the Egyptian army at the Battle of Carchemish, and withing 35 years, defeated Egypt proper. Writing in the 1st Century, Josephus had quoted the historian Berossus, who lived some 250 years after the fall of Babylon (and about 250 years before Josephus). In ...


2

RaDa”Q (R’ Dawidh Qimhi), commenting on Yehezqel 47:23, writes (my translation): והיה בשבט אשר גר הגר אתו - כי לעתיד בצאת ישראל מהגלות יודעו השבטים, אף על פי שהם מעורבים עתה ולא ידעו איש את שבטו, יבוא אליהו וייחס כל איש אל שבטו And, so it will be, in the tribe in which a convert lives with him - Because, in the future, when [the Nation of] Israel will leave ...


2

Keeping in mind that this is taken from Navi (Prophets), it seems appropriate to remember that most of the language of the Prophets is riddles and parables (חידות). In that context, this posuk appears to be describing five different levels of Torah.1 1) חִטֵּי מִנִּית is referring to the written Torah which is called 'wheat' (חטה). This is alluded to ...


2

R Yehuda Shurpin at chabad.org writes, in a nutshell, that Ezekiel's vision applied to a Temple built after full repentance and for an everlasting redemption. However, since the Jews repentance was only partial, the redemption was only partial and the Temple wasn't built to be everlasting, e.g., it lacked critical components such as the Holy Ark. In ...


2

This isn't much. Basically showing what the book is about. But is well worth the purchase. The Messianic Temple by Chaim Clorfene.


2

No, that seems like a pretty good translation of the original Hebrew to me. The Talmud (Bava Basra 75a) expounds these verses as referring to neither Hiram nor Satan but rather Adam. Hence, “You were in Eden, the garden of G-d.” The remainder of the passage is indicative of the honor bestowed upon him while he was still in the Garden. אמר רבי חמא (בר) ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible