9

UPDATE The question was edited to add the reference to the fact that when the Yetzer Hara was totaly eliminated, chickens stopped laying eggs. This means that the general concept of "lust" means that there is a desire to actually do or accomplish. This means that without the drive that we have, people cannot accomplish anything in this world. If we never ...


7

This is the subject of dispute between R. Saadyah Gaon and the kabbalists, on the one hand, and ibn Ezra and Maimonides on the other. According to Rasag (Emunot ve-de'ot 4:1), man is greater than all other creatures by virtue of his free will. This is also the view of the kabbalists: Man is greater than the angels in that he was given inclinations, and ...


6

See Tanya Chapter 1 (which alludes to this Yerushalmi), which is explained in detail in Chapter 10. In short killing it means the inclination for evil has no expression for its energy, no life. It is dead because it has no expression, yet it is not turned over to good because the Tzaddiks love for Hashem is not complete, thus not completely transformative. ...


5

https://guardyoureyes.com/ GYE’s goal is to help every Jew who is struggling with inappropriate internet use get the help he needs in the most efficient and professional way possible. Guard Your Eyes has already helped many thousands of Jews get back on a path of healing and self-control, by providing free and anonymous help for all levels of the struggle. ...


4

Yitzchok Isaac Krasilschikov, In his commentary to the Yerushalmi תולדות יצחק‏ explains as follows: לא היה יכול לעמוד בו וכו'. ר"ל לעשות שלום עמו והרגו כפה אותו בתענתים ובתורה ובשירים ותשבחות לעשות רצון בוראו:‏ He could not with stand it etc. Which is to say make peace with it. And he killed it; he forced it with fasts and Torah study and songs and ...


4

Rabbi Avraham Peretz Friedman, in Marital Intimacy chapter 4, cites Rabbi Naphtali Wiesner's book, In His Own Image: ... [T]he good yetzer usually appears in the Talmudic and other Rabbinic sources as "yetzer tov," meaning absolutely [intrinsically] good, whereas the evil yetzer is "yetzer harah," which may be translated as yetzer of evil (intention)-i.e.,...


4

Below is part of an answer I posted with respect to another question, but it is directly applicable to your question: At [Yoma 29a][1], the Gemara quotes Rav Nachman who says that sinful thoughts are worse than sinful acts. Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, in his [Daf Yomi notes][2], comments that here the Gemara is using the term aveira and when it does, it is ...


4

One of my Rabbis put it like this: When I see a pretty, half-dressed (undressed?) girl get on the bus I also get excited. That is the way we were made and is nature. What makes the difference is what you do next. Do you stare or do you try to ignore her or avoid staring.


4

You are asking many questions. I will answer the one in the title. The gemara says explicitly that, the greater a person, the greater his yetzer hara (Sukka 52a) כל הגדול מחבירו יצרו גדול הימנו Anyone who is greater than another, his evil inclination is greater than his.


4

Visiting the sick aids one in his battle against the Evil Inclination: Nedarim 40a Protecting against the evil inclination with Teshuva (repentance) and Gemilut Chasadim (good deeds): Nedarim 32b Seemingly, women are obligated to do Gemilut Chasadim which doesn't have a fixed time as stated in Pea 1,1, אלו דברים שאין להם שיעור הפיאה והביכורים והראיון ...


4

One approach is suggested by a 'Rabbi Yochanan' quoted in the commentary of the Sefer Marit HaAyin of the Chida on Berachos 17a. The Gemara discusses a special reward reserved for women, and explains how they merit it: אֲמַר לֵיהּ רַב לְרַבִּי חִיָּיא: נָשִׁים בְּמַאי זָכְיָין? בְּאַקְרוֹיֵי בְּנַיְיהוּ לְבֵי כְנִישְׁתָּא, וּבְאַתְנוֹיֵי גַּבְרַיְיהוּ בֵּי ...


4

The notion of Yefas Toar is something that is very hard to comprehend. However when taken within the context of war and the resulting environment, Rabbi Frand helps to paint a clearer picture. He writes here: War is an environment the likes of which we should never know. It is a dehumanizing experience, which does crazy things to people. One has only to ...


4

Good question. The truth is that during times of war, a soldier is allowed to eat non-kosher food if kosher food is not available. The way the Rambam sounds, allowing foreign women is a similar concession, but the Torah put a restriction on it that the soldier must marry the woman, and not just leave her. See here. חֲלוּצֵי צָבָא כְּשֶׁיִּכָּנְסוּ בִּגְבוּל ...


4

The Torah Temimah in a footnote asks this exact question: ויש להעיר בעיקר כלל זה לא דברה תורה אלא כנגד יצה"ר, הלא לפי"ז לא שבקית קיום לכל מצוה, דנימא דכיון שאפשר שיעבור באיסור נתיר לו שיעשה בהיתר, וי"ל דלא נאמר כלל זה אלא במלחמה, דאז צריך שיהי' רוח כל איש נכון בקרבו ולא יצער נפשו כדי שיוכל לעמוד בקשרי מלחמה, וכמבואר בס"פ שופטים בענין ...


3

A very central question. I want to quote an other Gemara concerning dealing with evil inclination (Berachot 5a): א''ר לוי בר חמא אמר ר''ש בן לקיש לעולם ירגיז אדם יצר טוב על יצר הרע שנא' {תהילים ד-ה} רגזו ואל תחטאו. אם נצחו מוטב ואם לאו יעסוק בתורה שנאמר אמרו בלבבכם אם נצחו מוטב ואם לאו יקרא קריאת שמע שנאמר על משכבכם אם נצחו מוטב ואם לאו יזכור לו יום המיתה ...


3

See the 6th chapter of Shemonah Ferakim in which Rambam mentions this aphorism, as part of his presentation of seemingly contradictory sources about whether it is better to have a negative urge and fight it, or to not have the urge at all. His conclusion is that the urge towards sins whose impropriety is generally intuitive is indicative of a character flaw ...


3

Not so much an answer as much as why I think it's impossible to give you one: Free Will lives in a region between algorithm and randomness. (See Metahalakhah, by R/Dr Moshe Koppel, ch. 2-3, for an actual information theory treatment of this topic.) If our decisions were an algorithm, then we'd be robots, with a given history of inputs causing our decisions ...


3

I recommend reading the book Garden of Purity by Rabbi Shalom Arush, which explains in detail not only the importance of guarding one's eyes and avoiding lustful thoughts, but also how to achieve these goals. In short, given your situation he would probably recommend not looking at her (and avoiding interacting with her if possible), and engaging in daily ...


3

1.) Yes. Similarly see Talmud Sotah 3a: "No one sins unless a spirit of insanity enters them." 2.) Your level of Yiras Shomayim is subject to how much you work on it. It is also not limited by heaven; whereas your physical height or your IQ etc. are given by Hashem at birth etc. However, Hashem, for whatever reason He sees fit, could override your current ...


3

OPTION 1 - Web Chaver You might want to consider using Web Chaver. Essentially you designate a good/trustworthy friend as your 'chaver' and they receive a weekly summary of any potentially risky sites that you may have visited. The fact that you have someone basically checking up on you, is a good form of 'shmira' in unto itself. Or to quote them: WebChaver ...


3

Some English seforim that may be of interest are as follows: Positive Vision: Real-World Strategies for Shmiras Einayim by Rabbi Avrohom Neuberger. (You can view some sample pages on the linked page) The blurb reads as follows: Shemiras eiynayim? Kedushah? They are fantastic concepts - for tzaddikim. But for me? The first thing you should know is: You can ...


3

A few Shiurim to get one started... On Guard Your Eyes - over 400 shiurim available via phone. YU Torah - 'SHMIRAS EINAYIM - a little less curious, a lot more s'char' by Rabbi Noam Singer Teshuva on Shovevim - Shemiras Einayim - Rabbi Zecharia Wallerstein Nowhere to Turn - Internet Addiction


2

In rabbinic literature, the Satan is depicted as having a personality, and yetzer hara is equated to Satan. Obviously the Satan as a character is found in the beginning of Job: 1:6 וַיְהִי הַיּוֹם--וַיָּבֹאוּ בְּנֵי הָאֱלֹהִים, לְהִתְיַצֵּב עַל-יְהוָה; וַיָּבוֹא גַם-הַשָּׂטָן, בְּתוֹכָם. Now it fell upon a day, that the sons of God came to present ...


2

We are what make the final choice.


2

I would suggest you read Rabbi Hirsch's commentary on those verses 3: 14-15. Specifically he writes: we have to take this pronouncement against the serpent not so much as punishment for the serpent as from the point of view of the education of mankind. He spells out his reasoning and proofs there. I think this would suffice to answer the specific ...


2

'The word 'satan' means 'adversary' and is derived from the verb 'satan' ('to lie in wait'). The word "Satan" is used 24 times in the Tanakh. In Job (1:6 f) and Zec (3:1 f) it has the prefixed definite article. In all cases but one when the article is omitted it is used in a general sense. This one exception is 1Ch 21:1 (compare 2Sa 24:1), where the word is ...


2

The Evil Inclination is not a Jew, it is a malach, and therefore is not commanded in any of the mitzvos which were given to klall yisrael, but whose purpose is to made good decisions have meaning by making them dificult. Just like any malach, he has his own purpose, different than that of a Jew.


2

There are several different definitions of a tsaddik that are used in various ways. Here are 3 that I have heard: 1) Someone whose good deeds outweighs their bad Rabbi Shimon ben Lakish, an ex-highwayman 2) Someone who has a yetzer hara but he tends to master it e.g. Moshe who did sin occasionally 3) Someone who is so in tune with God that his yetzer ...


2

The first time the term "Yetzer...Ra" is used is in Genesis 8. It takes place after Noah brings sacrifices after the Great Flood. וַיָּ֣רַח יְהֹוָה֘ אֶת־רֵ֣יחַ הַנִּיחֹ֒חַ֒ וַיֹּ֨אמֶר יְהֹוָ֜ה אֶל־לִבּ֗וֹ לֹ֣א אֹ֠סִ֠ף לְקַלֵּ֨ל ע֤וֹד אֶת־הָֽאֲדָמָה֙ בַּֽעֲב֣וּר הָֽאָדָ֔ם כִּ֠י יֵ֣צֶר לֵ֧ב הָֽאָדָ֛ם רַ֖ע מִנְּעֻרָ֑יו וְלֹֽא־אֹסִ֥ף ע֛וֹד לְהַכּ֥וֹת אֶת־...


2

If the activities you are performing are halachically acceptable, I see no formal obligation to stop (but see Ramban's comment on Vayikra 19:2 - naval b'reshut haTorah). However, if you feel the yetzer hara is driving you to those, you become conscious of the test you are facing: giving in or overcoming it. This is the "job" of the yetzer hara, to test you ...


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