15

Mishne Berurah (238, Shaar HaTziyun 1) writes that the Midrash (Pirkei d'Rebbi Eliezer 46 and Tanchumah Parsha Ki Sisa 36) writes that Moshe Rabenu was taught the Written Torah during the day and the Oral Torah at night. From this Midrash the Ba'er Hetev (2) (and Arizal [ed]) concludes that one should not learn the written Torah at night. The Pri Megadim ...


10

Only Yom Kippur and Tisha b'Av are 25-hour fasts. The others are minor fasts, from dawn (first light, before sunrise) until nightfall (full dark). The minor fasts are: Fast of Gedaliah (3 Tishrei) 10 Tevet Fast of Esther (13 Adar) Fast of the Firstborn (for those to whom it applies) (14 Nisan) 17 Tamuz You can read more about these fasts at Judaism 101.


8

The seventh day of Pesah is associated in rabbinic literature with the splitting of the sea (for example, Rashi on Exodus 14:5 s.v. vayyuggad lemelekh mitzrayim writes that "on the fifth and sixth days they chased after them, and the night of the seventh they entered the sea, and in the morning uttered song, namely the seventh day of Pesah, and thus we sing ...


8

Dose of Halacha explains: The Gemara (Nidda 17a) writes that it is dangerous to leave peeled garlic, onion or egg overnight due to ruach ra’ah, evil spirit. This halacha only applies if the entire onion, garlic or egg is peeled. However, if part of it remains unpeeled, or if it has already been mixed with any other food, it may be eaten (Kaf Hachaim ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 89:5) discusses what to do if you were eating before dawn (alot hashachar; the earliest time for Shacharit), and then dawn happened (and now you are obligated in Shacharit): must you stop eating or not. It seems from here that you are allowed to eat so long as dawn has not happened. The Mishna Berura there notes that if the eating is ...


7

Nitei Gavriel Hilchos Yom Hakipurim page 181 note 24 in the name of Siach Yitzchak that we wear a Talis at Kol Nidrei based on the Yerushalmi Chagiga 1:5 that says that one needs to wear a Talis at the time of Hataras Nedarim. He goes on to say that one should only make a Bracha on the Talis up to the time he would normally Daven Mincha.


7

According to the Siddur HaRashash as set forth in Shaar HaKavvanot 89a(the paragraph that starts with the words זהו הסדר). Tikun Leil Shavuot: Genesis 1:1-Gen 2:4 Gen 6:6-6:12 Gen 11:30-12:3 Gen 17:25-18:3 Gen 22:22-23:3 Gen 25:16-21 Gen 28:7-12 Gen 32:3-8 Gen 36:41-37:3 Gen 40:21-41:3 Gen 44:15-20 Gen 47:23-28 Gen 50:24-Ex 1:3 Ex ...


7

In the siddur of Rabbi Shabtai from Rashkov, which presents kavvanot of the Arizal (many books do, it's just the one I have at hand), it says, in the section 'Kriat Shma she-al Ha-Mita': אין ללמוד מקרא בלילה כי הקורא בלי פירוש עומדת בעשייה מקום תגבורת הדינין ואין ראוי לעוררן בזמן שליטתן שהוא לילה One should not learn Miqra at night because reading [...


7

The Pischei Tshuva in Yoreh Deah siman siff 195 #19 mentions a minhag not to go to the cemetery to pray during their Nida days. See here starting by footnote 12 for some more information. http://shulchanaruchharav.com/Home-Database/default.aspx?pageid=women31


7

The Rema quotes the Rosh as saying to do it during the day. The Mishnah Berurah also says this, as does Rav Ovadia.


6

The time for the mitzvah is tied to the se'udah which is held during the day. The Ran (Megilla 3b in the pages of the Rif) addresses the issue. Despite the fact that megilla reading varies, the se’udat Purim does not; it must be scheduled on the 14th or 15th (depending on whether the city is walled). Hence, the Ran claims, since mishloach manot is part of ...


6

tl;dr - it's kabbalah (likely), or it's to reject karaites (highly unlikely), it's coincidental because the evening prayer is optional (very likely). To me, the most likely option is that this is based on Kabbalah, although for the opposite reason of what you suggest (not because angels only say it during the day, but because they only say it at night). ...


5

Orach Chaim 188:10 says that one who starts a Seuda before the end of Chanuka and completes it after Chanuka would say Al HaNisim.


5

The Piskei Tshuvos 581:3 brings in the footnotes from the Aruch Hashulchan seif 12 that one should not blow at night the whole month of elul even to practice because we don't do hissarirus at night.He also brings the Igros Moshe 4:21 that when the Rama said that there are those who blow shofar at night he meant after mincha or places who daven maariv during ...


5

Summarizing from p. 349 of this book: The custom originated from Rav Meir of Rothenberg who stated that on the night of Yom Kippur we recite the 13 "middot" - Attrubutes of Mercy, multiple times during our tefillah (after the Amidah). There is a midrash (mentioned in Talmud Rosh Hashannah 17b) that G-d wrapped himself in a tallit, similar to a Chazzan when ...


5

R. H. Schachter rules, in a responsum found here, that this Hallel is only to be recited in a synagogue setting, as a way of publicizing the miracle of the Exodus. As such, even if ten men pray together at home and will then all be participating in the same Seder, they should not recite Hallel after Arvit. However, R. Asher Weiss (Minchat Asher, Leket Shi’...


5

Not sure if this quite what you’re looking for, but Maimonides (Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Talmud Torah 3:13) writes: אף על פי שמצוה ללמוד ביום ובלילה אין אדם למד רוב חכמתו אלא בלילה לפיכך מי שרצה לזכות בכתר התורה יזהר בכל לילותיו ולא יאבד אפילו אחד מהן בשינה ואכילה ושתיה ושיחה וכיוצא בהן אלא בתלמוד תורה ודברי חכמה אמרו חכמים אין רנה של תורה אלא בלילה שנאמר ...


4

Birkot HaShachar can, according to the Magen Avraham (47:13), can be said as early as midnight, but I'm not sure if that's the general custom, because I've noticed that people usually wait until alot hashachar. In general, the Shulchan Aruch (89:3) says that you can't perform anything for yourself, but doing things for the purposes of a mitzvah is ok. ...


4

Let's assume you're far down as Cape Town at 33° 55′ 31″ S. Candle lighting on the first day of Chanuka (this year, 5775) at sunset would be at 19:55 and if you wait for night then it's at 20:25. However, one can light as early as Plag HaMincha which will be at 18:25 - that may be the simplest way to get the children involved - light as early as ...


4

Bottom line is that Sepharadim's minhag is like the Geonim's psak. In Yalkut Yossef (of R Yitzchak Yossef, son of R Ovadia), Hilchot Shabbat, Siman 293, halacha 2-3, the psak is: ב. זמן צאת השבת בכל ערי הארץ הוא בערך כעשרים דקות אחר השקיעה. והמחמירים מוסיפים מחול על הקודש עד כחצי שעה אחר השקיעה. [...] [end of halacha dropped by me] ג. אולם ראוי ...


4

Rambam seems to provide an answer הלכות אסורי ביאה ד,ו: כָּל חַיָּבֵי טְבִילוֹת, טְבִילָתָן בַּיּוֹם: חוּץ מִנִּדָּה וְיוֹלֶדֶת--שֶׁהֲרֵי הוּא אוֹמֵר בַּנִּדָּה "שִׁבְעַת יָמִים תִּהְיֶה בְנִדָּתָהּ" (ויקרא טו,יט), הַשִּׁבְעָה כֻּלָּן בְּנִדָּה וְטוֹבֶלֶת בְּלֵיל שְׁמִינִי; וְכֵן יוֹלֶדֶת זָכָר בְּלֵיל שְׁמִינִי, וְיוֹלֶדֶת נְקֵבָה בְּלֵיל ...


4

Mishne Brurah (695, 16) cites a dispute among Poskim as to whether one may recite Al Hanisim in bentching after davening Maariv after Purim (where he does not say Al Hanissim). To avoid the disagreement he quotes Magen Avraham that one should bentch first and then daven Maariv.


4

This is sourced in the Sefer Tahara K'halacha which brings that if a a woman is waiting for her husband who is out of town but does not know when he will return should be tovel so she will be mutar to him whenever he arrives. However, he brings segulos that the woman should perform to prevent any danger. This includes a knife under her pillow,or cover ...


4

Shulchan Aruch in siman 481 writes: A person is required to involve themselves in the laws of Pesach and Yetzias Mitzraim and discuss the signs and wonders that Hashem did for our forefathers until he is 'caught' by sleep. Be'er Hagola points out this is all from the Tur in the name of the Tosefta, based on the story With Rabi Eleazar and Rabi Yehoshua ...


4

SA OC 30:2 rules that One is prohibited to put Tefillin on at night since he may forget [that he has them on] and sleep in them. But if he puts them on before the sun sets and it happens to get dark, even if he wears them the whole night, it is permitted. The Rambam (Hilchot Tefillin end of 4:11) rules this is a transgression d'oraita. A person ...


3

I recently found the answer: Talmud Niddah 67b (soncino translation follows) in that women started bathing in the Evening following Rabbinic ruling that they should not bathe on the 8th day, lest their daughter see them and think they are bathing on the seventh day. Rab ruled: If a menstruant performs immersion at 'the proper time she may do it only at ...


3

Biur Halacha (503:1 "Beyom Tov") writes that it forbidden to prepare from before shkiya for after shkiya. Shmiras Shabbas Kehilchoso Chapter 28 footnote 168 quotes this with regards to Shabbos as well. (See there that he discusses preparing during Bein Hashmoshos for Bein Hashmoshos).


3

You asked if hamapil and Shema is good enough, see in SA OC 239, 1, this is exactly what he says: קורא על מטתו פרשה ראשונה של שמע ומברך המפיל חבלי שינה על עיני וכו'.ואומר יושב בסתר עליון. ואומר ה' מה רבו צרי עד לה' הישועה ואומר ברוך ה' ביום ברוך ה' בלילה ברוך ה' בשכבנו ברוך ה' בקומנו ויאמר ה' אל השטן יגער ה' בך השטן וגו' ה' שומרך וגו' מעתה ועד עולם בידך ...


3

In short: there isn't, or at least, not sufficient evidence. The author of the article quoted in the question seems to misunderstand the sources he quotes. While it may be true that the Rashbam interpreted verse in question (Genesis 1:5) in a way that implies that night follows the day, he is in no way making a legal statement, and as he himself says ...


3

Nitei Gavriel - Aveilus 2 - 75:1 says that there are those that light the Yarzheit candle before sunset. He says in the notes on bottom see next page - note 2 that is the Minhag Chabad. Based on this I would say one can do as they please and light the candle whenever is best for them.


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