14

This would have to begin with Micah 6:8: והצנע לכת עם א-להיך, "be tzanua in walking with your G-d" (this is one of only two instances of this root in Tanach, the other being in Prov. 11:2, ואת צנועים חכמה). The Gemara (Sukkah 49b and Rashi there) explain this as referring to mitzvos done in public, like funerals and weddings; even these need to be done with ...


10

Bereishit Rabbah 39:13 (39:4 in some edition) brings a machloket Rav and Shemuel if Esther was 40 or 80 years old respectively. According to the opinion of the Rabbanan, she was 75 years old.


8

There are several places in the Talmud which assume she was taken by force, e.g. Megillah 15a: לך כנוס את כל היהודים וגו' עד אשר לא כדת אמר רבי אבא שלא כדת היה שבכל יום ויום עד עכשיו באונס ועכשיו ברצון וכאשר אבדתי אבדתי כשם שאבדתי מבית אבא כך אובד ממך Rashi there: עד עכשיו. נבעלתי באונס: ועכשיו. מכאן ואילך מדעתי: אבדתי ממך. ואסורה אני לך דאשת ישראל ...


8

Talmud Bavli, Megillah 14a lists the seven prophetesses as: Sarah Miriam Deborah Hannah Abigail Huldah Esther (Interestingly enough, Eve is not listed as one of the prophetesses.) The Talmud proceeds to derive the prophetic status of each of these women from a biblical verse or verses. When it comes to Esther, you are correct that the derivation is ...


6

See the commentary of the Ibn Ezra on Esther 8:1 (page 30 in the linked document) where he says that Mordechai was Esther's uncle.


6

It appears that the Tannaim Reb Meir and Reb Yehudah (and others) dealt with this question in Megilla 13a. Rabbi Meir said: her name was Esther; why was she called Hadassah? Because of the Righteos Tzaddikim who are called Haddasim. Rabbi Yehuda said: her name was Hadassah; why was she called Esther? Because she hid her words (the information ...


6

Encyclopedia Judaica's entry for "Hamadan, Iran" says: The Persian Jews identify Hamadan with "Shushan ha-Bira," which obviously is a mistake. An essay entitled "Esther’s Tomb Iran's Jewish queen defies decay and dissolution." by the Diarna Project offers an alternative explanation for the tradition that the tomb is in Hamadan: Mount Alvand, which ...


6

Esther 2:8 uses the term "Vatilakach" - she was taken. While it doesn't clearly imply "forcibly", there are several hints that this was mandatory. One is 2:3 that says that the king should gather EVERY virgin girl. The text alone doesn't state that Esther was married, so she might have been a betulah. Even if we follow the explanations that she was married,...


6

The following is culled from Oz V'hadar's Mesivta on Megillas Esther, page 37, note 89; pages 230-232; and pages 251-252. Unless otherwise specified, the mefarshim are on Esther 2:10. Mordechai wanted people to think that she was from a lowly family, and not from Sha'ul HaMelech. Had Achashveirosh known she was Jewish, that may have impacted her odds of ...


5

Haman and the King were the guests. However, as nobility there were servants and "members of the staff" there. The modern concepts of privacy did not exist in those days. Consider that a noble would be able to sit down without considering if a chair was there, because one would "miraculously" appear under him. Thus, Charvonah was standing there waiting to be ...


5

Malbim explains (as I think is pshat in pesukim) that Ester was just found in her house, but he was her adopted father, and might have just picked her off the street; she could have been from anywhere. Achashveirosh did have him hang around and give him gifts though, to influence Ester to say who her real parents/origin was when she would see how well ...


4

The Gemara in Rosh Hashana 3b(which talks about when to start the counting of a kings reign) writes that Koresh(he was a kosher king),Daryavesh(his actual name),and Artachasasta(name of his kingdom) are one in the same. The question is was Daryavish Esther's son. The simple answer is that its a machlokes. Tosfos on that Daf explains that Daryavish was ...


4

The Talmud in Megillah 7a says the following: דר"ע דלמא כר' אלעזר דאמר מלמד שכל אחד ואחד נדמתה לו כאומתו Against the proof of R. Akiba it may be objected that perhaps the fact is as stated by R. Eleazar, who said that these words show that to every man she appeared to belong to his own nation. (Soncino translation) Rashi there explains: והיו ...


4

Vayikra Rabbah 13:5 records a tradition that King Darius was the son of Esther (and Ahasuerus): אָמַר רַבִּי יְהוּדָה בְּרַבִּי סִימוֹן דָּרְיָוֶשׁ הָאַחֲרוֹן בְּנָהּ שֶׁל אֶסְתֵּר הָיָה, טָהוֹר מֵאִמּוֹ וְטָמֵא מֵאָבִיו.‏ Said R. Yehuda son of R. Simon, "Darius the Last was the son of Esther, pure from his mother and impure from his father." It ...


3

According to the Targum Sheni (2:10) Mordechai was concerned with Esther revealing this because the king would become upset with Esther at some point and direct his anger out on her people. Just as (later) Haman directed his hatred against Mordechai to the rest of the Jewish people, the king could do the same with Esther.


2

To respond only to your second question, there is a relevant passage in the gemara on Sanhedrin 74b. An objection is raised that concerns how Esther could have submitted herself publicly to Ahashverosh when we learn that it is better to die than to commit the sin of 'forbidden relations'. The terse resolution of Abayye is to suggest that "Esther was like the ...


2

Main points and answers in Bold. There are many aspects that need to be discussed in order to properly answer this question, but this will only really be a question according to the (minor) minority opinion that your question is based on, that Esther is a foreign, name, whereas Hadassah is a Hebrew name. This will be shown below. The answer according to ...


2

You'll be interested to know that (a) Yosef Lekach to 2:10 and Malbim to 2:20 ask your question, and (b) Targum Sheni to 2:20 rewords the verse to be the same order as the first one: ארמית: אין ולית אסתר מחויא ית עמא ותולדותא עברית: אין אתסר מגדת את עמה ומולדתה Yosef Lekach to 2:11 and 2:19 explains the switch. On verse 2:11 he says originally ...


2

Perhaps they fasted because they were Esther's, similar to how the people of Ninveh made their animals fast when they repented.


2

According to this website, a woman is required to fast unless she doesn't feel well enough to do so Many authorities, including the Kaf Ha’haim (based on the Bah), the Elya Rabba, the Kisur Shulhan Aruch, Hacham Bension Abba Shaul, Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach and Rabbi Mazuz, ruled that the status of a woman during this period vis-à-vis Ta’anit Ester ...


2

I'm afraid I have no source for this, but my reading of Esther 8:1 is that she revealed to Achashverosh only that Mordechai was her cousin, and did not tell him that he was also her husband.


2

Haman hated the Jewish people and yearned to wipe them out, but he doubted that Achashveirosh would agree. Therefore, he fooled Achashveirosh into issuing a decree to destroy the Jewish people. Haman said to Achashveirosh, “im al hamelech tov yikateiv le’avdam (3:9) — “If the King agrees, letters should be sent out to make slaves (לעבדם) out of the Jewish ...


2

Ralbag on Esther 8:3 that the rule was that any time someone came unsummoned he was in risk of his life unless the king extended the scepter. Note that Haman had come and waited in the outer chamber until the king happened to ask if anyone was waiting to see him. This was the normal procedure and even if the king was glad to see her, or happened to want to ...


2

Rambam (Matnos Aniyim 8:10, Meszler translation) seems to understand that a halachic "captive" must be one who is in danger: פִּדְיוֹן שְׁבוּיִים קוֹדֵם לְפַרְנָסַת עֲנִיִּים וְלִכְסוּתָן. וְאֵין לְךָ מִצְוָה גְּדוֹלָה כְּפִדְיוֹן שְׁבוּיִים שֶׁהַשָּׁבוּי הֲרֵי הוּא בִּכְלַל הָרְעֵבִים וְהַצְּמֵאִים וַעֲרוּמִּים וְעוֹמֵד בְּסַכָּנַת נְפָשׁוֹת. ...


2

The gemarah ketubot 51b states as follows (with explanation from Sefaria.org) ת"ר שבויי מלכות הרי הן כשבויין גנובי ליסטות אינן כשבויין והתניא איפכא The Sages taught: With regard to women captured by the monarchy for the purpose of having intercourse with the king, they are considered to be like captives, i.e., they are assumed to have been raped but ...


1

At the time she has asked for both using the chen which the king has shown her. Once Haman is dead and Mordechai made the King's representative, she sees that only the first part of her request has been granted. She (and those close to her) are now safe. However, the king has not acted to cancel the evil that Haman has done. The explicit statement in the ...


1

Rabeinu, Without getting a little Meshuge, the answer really is in the fact that Esther fasted for 3 days before she went in to see the King. Remember this was no little undertaking. Whether she was married to Mordecai or had been a virgin or had been summoned or not by the King is immaterial because in this particular case, the King was the ruler of all ...


1

The Maharal to that verse assumes like your two assumptions: (a) her handmaidens weren't Jewish, as that would have raised suspicion that she was Jewish and (b) no seeming purpose that they should fast. He infers from the end that verse which says אָצ֣וּם כֵּ֑ן, literally I will fast, excludes her handmaidens from her fast. He explains that while they did ...


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