24

It's not either/or but "both, and". Judaism has a system of rules, halacha, by which we are to live our lives. Halacha is not negotiable, so that might sound like "all or nothing". Instead, think of it as what you aspire to, even if it's not what you currently do. Halacha calls on you to do all that you can, but also recognizes that all humans are ...


19

A buffet-style standing meal, or wine-and-cheese mixer, or the like, in the office: Just don't eat. No one will notice, or, if anyone does, you can explain why you're not eating. (Presumably, if you work there for more than a short while, someone will eventually cotton on to the fact that you keep kosher anyway.) (Note: I don't see why it'd be impermissible ...


18

Targum Yonassan followed by Rashi (2:1) explain that she was an inkeeper (that "zona" in this context relates to the word "mazon" for bread). Radak explains that she was actually a prostitute and that even Targum agrees, and that sometimes Targum uses the term for innkeeper to mean harlot. Abarbanel writes that the two explanation arent mutually exclusive ...


15

Anecdotally, I've heard that it is common for shluchim, as one of their first acts upon arrival in a new community, to purchase burial plots for themselves - thus demonstrating that they intend to remain there for the rest of their lives. Most of them do in fact do so. One example is R' Yehuda Leib Raskin, shliach in Casablanca, Morocco, who passed away in ...


15

The Talmud Bavli (Zevachim 116b, top) states quite plainly that she was a harlot: דאמר מר: אין לך כל שר ונגיד שלא בא על רחב הזונה. אמרו: בת י' שנים היתה כשיצאו ישראל ממצרים, וזנתה [כל] מ' שנה שהיו ישראל במדבר, אחר נ' שנה נתגיירה, אמרה: יהא מחול לי בשכר חבל חלון ופשתים. [A]s a master said, There was no prince or ruler who had not possessed Rahab the ...


13

This is awkward, particularly if you have behaved differently in the past (so people who knew you then will be confused by the change). I would not send pre-emptive email; I don't think it will reduce the face-to-face confusion and it risks seeming to make a mountain out of a mole-hill. You're also going to be leaving early on Fridays, not eating the ...


13

An employer is paying the premiums on an employee's insurance policy, which will then pay the medical expenses incurred by the employee committing a halachically-unacceptable act. With respect to "Lifnei Iver" or "placing a stumbling block before the blind," there are multiple mitigating factors: The prohibited act may never happen. The employee may never ...


12

Judaism is indeed a religion with a large number of rules, but it is certainly not "all or nothing." On one hand, the mitzvot are not considered to be simply guidelines. They are strict rules that every Jew should be careful to follow. So, in your example, Judaism says that you should not go to work on Shabbat. We have faith that we will be able to care ...


11

There are 5 main avenues for finding a job in Israel. 1. LinkedIn Many people in Israel use linkedIn and there are many Israel centric groups for all sorts of fields. (Mostly related to "white collar" jobs) There are few manual labor or blue collar jobs on LinkedIn but there are some. 2. Nefesh B'Nefesh's Employment Resources These resources will help ...


11

I was a paramedic for a long time. The one frum woman I knew who did this work wore a baseball cap with the EMS department LOGO on it as part of the "uniform". In the winter she wore a winter hat with the same logo. She had reletively short hair that all fit into the caps.


10

I would think that the normal assumption for an employee discount would that it would be for the personal use of the employee and not for his friends and not for him to do business with. I am supported in this by this article about the Original Employee Discount. He quotes: “When you come [to work] in your neighbor’s vineyard, then you may eat the ...


9

Having worked at a large University, and a consulting firm, I have yet to have any real issues. If you ask in advance, it is usually possible to get kosher food. It feels a bit odd, since it comes wrapped and looks different, but it is not that bad really. I have yet to find an instance where people give me a hard time about it. I am also big, bright,...


9

You don't need to jump straight to declining the invitation. There might be things you can eat, and even if not you won't be impolite to the restaurant by joining a paying group. The key is to communicate clearly. You can explain to the person who invited you -- or, more likely, his administrative assistant -- that you would be delighted to come to the ...


9

First, as @Yirmeyahu commented above, there is no death penalty for "all sex outside marriage". There is a verse which states לֹא תִהְיֶה קְדֵשָׁה מִבְּנוֹת יִשְׂרָאֵל וְלֹא יִהְיֶה קָדֵשׁ מִבְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל, but that does not specify a death penalty of stoning. The prostitutes profession was irrelevant to the case. And it would not be a good society if ...


8

The difficulty you are experiencing comes about because according to the religious viewpoint, one who does not observe the commandments is a sinning Jew, but still a Jew. The Sages stated, "A Jew, even if he sins, is a Jew" Sanhedrin 44a. As Rabbi Yaakov Menken expresses it: A person who is born into the Jewish people, even a sincere convert who later ...


8

If you have a chance, listen to this fantastic lecture (mp3) by Rabbi Michael Broyde. He discusses, for instance, a lawyer who does very boring, standard real-estate contracts, but his employer is a "men's entertainment company." Inherently it's basically permissible; in most circumstances, it's questionable to what degree you're really facilitating ...


8

H/T Rabbi Torczyner. Binyan Tzion I:75 (Rabbi Yaakov Ettlinger) addresses a rabbi who was asked "may I deliver my sister-in-law's baby?" Halachically, inappropriately touching your sister-in-law is no different than inappropriately touching random married-to-someone-else woman, but there's perhaps a certain "eww" factor that prompted the question. His ...


8

Don't forget that Kohelet said "For there isn't a righteous person on earth who does only good and never sins". Do as much as you can and always strive to do better. If not being able to keep Shabbat properly upsets you enough, you will find another job that enables you to keep Shabbat, and so on for all the rest. I heard once "How can a Tzaddik sin?" - and ...


8

Rabbi Yitzchak Breitowitz discussed this in a tzedaka lecture; it's considered giving to charity, but at 90% the rate. If my legal work goes for $100/hr, and I did an extra hour of work, I'd make $100 of which I'd keep $90 and give $10 to tzedaka. So if instead I donate an hour of my legal work to charity, it's only $90 I'd be seeing in my wallet, hence if ...


8

The Rambam in הלכות דעות פרק ה says the following: כג: דרך בעלי דעה, שיקבע לו אדם מלאכה המפרנסת אותו תחילה, ואחר כך יקנה בית דירה, ואחר כך יישא אישה--שנאמר "מי האיש אשר נטע כרם, ולא חיללו . . . אשר בנה בית חדש . . . אשר אירש אישה" (ראה דברים כ,ה-ז) "The behavior of intelligent people is to first get [trained in] a job so he can support himself, then ...


8

You may be referring to the Chidushei Chasam Sofer on Bava Basra 57b. The gemara there states as follows: בעא מיניה ר' יוחנן מרבי בנאה... שלחן של ת"ח כיצד שני שלישי גדיל ושליש גלאי ועליו קערות וירק וטבעתו מבחוץ והא תניא טבעתו מבפנים לא קשיא הא דאיכא ינוקא הא דליכא ינוקא ואי בעית אימא הא והא דליכא ינוקא ולא קשיא הא דאיכא שמעא הא דליכא שמעא ואי בעית אימא ...


8

Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh Deah siman 240 siff 5 says one is required to lose work in order to honor his parents, even though this will cause the child to end up needing to collect money for himself. However, this is only when the son has money to support himself that day, if he does not have even that much, he does not have to lose work.


7

I'm thinking Lashon HaRa' and Hashavath Aveidah are probably among the two most prevalent sets of Halachoth that would require review. (Of course many other every day Halachoth would be relevant as well, but I'm considering those that might need to be refreshed.)


7

Shlichus, like described in the Gemara, means that one is sent on a mission and accepts to fulfill it. The Rebbe sent his emissaries out on their mission (and Shliach Oseh Shliach) to make this world a holier, more G-dly place and to usher in the final Redemption, Moshiach. This explains why Shluchim do not retire, leave their positions, or make Aliyah to ...


7

Per this article at ohr.edu there are 2 possibilities where one may cook meat with milk. One solution (which should only be done with the parents' permission) is that your daughter put the pot on the stove and supervise while one of the children lights the fire; or that she first light the fire and supervise while the child places the pot. By ...


7

(If you're in a rush, skip to the last paragraph.) Let us first compare the texts to see what the discrepancies actually are. The Talmudic passage reads as follows: Kiddushin 82a תנו רבנן כל שעסקיו עם הנשים סורו רע כגון הצורפים והסריקים והנקורות והרוכלין והגרדיים והספרים והכובסים והגרע והבלן והבורסקי אין מעמידים מהם לא מלך ולא כהן גדול מאי טעמא לא ...


7

Between Purim and the next Shemini Atzeret the calendar is completely fixed (no leap years, leap days, etc.). The four possibilities are: Purim (F), Pesach (S-Sh), Shavuot (M), Tisha b'Av (S), Rosh haShana (T-W), Yom Kippur (R), Sukkot (T-T). That's 15 weekdays. (6 of complete Issur Melakha) Purim (S), Pesach (T-M), Shavuot (W), Tisha b'Av (T), Rosh haShana ...


7

The Talmud (Bava Batra 21a) presents the following dispute: ואמר רבא האי מקרי ינוקי דגריס ואיכא אחרינא דגריס טפי מיניה לא מסלקינן ליה דלמא אתי לאיתרשולי רב דימי מנהרדעא אמר כ"ש דגריס טפי קנאת סופרים תרבה חכמה Raba also said: If we have a teacher who gets on with the children and there is another who can get on better, we do not replace the first by ...


6

What I heard from Rabbi Yitzchak Breitowitz is as follows: If I provide a charity with $100 worth of services (let's assume that the standard going rate, had they paid for these services, is $100), I can take $90 off my maaser kesafim (tithing of funds). Had I done the work for-fee, I would have made $100, of which $10 would have gone towards tzedaka and $...


6

I wrote a piece on another blog about 3 years ago, that I think is still valid as a general rule with regard to wearing a Kippah at job interviews or at work. And I still believe that if an employer won't tolerate your wearing a Kippah you may not want to work there, but everyone needs to make his own decision. However, in your particular case, it sounds ...


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